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Tim Bryce on business, management, politics, and this crazy ever changing world of ours.

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WHO HAS GOT YOUR BACK?

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 29, 2014

BRYCE ON BUSINESS

- A lesson of loyalty in the workplace, and in life.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)

To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

In the office, we like to believe our fellow co-workers will back us up when push comes to shove. Actually, we’re being quite naive when this occurs. To illustrate, there was a systems manager in Chicago who had grown weary of the petty politics practiced by his boss, the I.T. Director. Projects were late, none of the systems were integrated, end-users were unhappy, and they found themselves in a constant fire-fighting mode (maintenance) as opposed to conquering new challenges. Instead of implementing discipline and organization, the Director played political games pitting his workers against each other, and morale deteriorated. The systems manager’s staff was unhappy and frequently vented their frustrations to him. Conditions got so bad, the manager told his staff he was going to march into the Director’s office, register a formal complaint and threaten that he and his department were prepared to resign. Everyone thought this was a bold and imaginative move which they endorsed.

The Director listened patiently. When the manager was finished, the Director asked for his resignation which the manager produced on the spot. The manager then collected his belongings, told his staff what had just occurred, and said he would be in the bar down the street if anyone would like to join him afterwards. To his surprise, nobody joined him.

Despite what the manager’s staff had told him, that they would resign en masse, they balked. The manager had drawn his confidence from his staff and was sure they would follow him out the door. He was surprised when not one person followed. It was a difficult lesson to learn.

Who has got your back? As the manager discovered the hard way, nobody. There will be times in your life when you are angry over an issue or someone. Your contemporaries may encourage you to act, but the truth is, you are on your own. Think twice. If you threaten to resign or stage a coup d’etat, understand two things: someone will inevitably call your bluff, and; realize you are doing this on your own. Your friends and co-workers may not feel as passionately as you do and may fear for the safety of their careers. In other words, you are advised to speak for yourself and do not rely on the support of others. It will not materialize.

The truth is, co-workers may do favors for you, but do not expect them to watch your back when push comes to shove. In such occasions, it is every man for himself.

The lesson learned by the manager is simple: Speak from your own convictions, not someone else’s.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  THERE IS A REASON FOR EVERYTHING – Understanding the concept of “cause” and “effect.”

LAST TIME:  NONSENSE SONGS  – It is interesting what we remember.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Business, Life, Management | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

NONSENSE SONGS

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 26, 2014

BRYCE ON MUSIC

- It is interesting what we remember.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Ever drive along in a car and suddenly an old tune comes to your lips, perhaps something from your childhood? Recently, I found myself blurting out, “Boop boop dit-tem dat-tem what-tem Chu!” Frankly, I couldn’t remember the name of the song, which I found rather irritating. This caused me to look it up through an Internet search engine. Remarkably, it was:

“Three Little Fishes” (click for Lyrics)
This was introduced by Kay Kysor and featured Ish Kabibble. The words and music were by Saxie Dowell and the song was a US No. 1 hit in 1939. Here’s a sample of the lyrics:

Down in the meadow in a little bitty pool
Swam three little fishies and a mama fishie too
“Swim” said the mama fishie, “Swim if you can”
And they swam and they swam all over the dam
Boop boop dit-tem dat-tem what-tem Chu!
Boop boop dit-tem dat-tem what-tem Chu!
Boop boop dit-tem dat-tem what-tem Chu!
And they swam and they swam all over the dam

I cannot explain why I recollect this song as it certainly wasn’t from my generation. Perhaps I remember it as a song from childhood. Whatever the reason, I found it remarkable I could recall it. Actually, there are a lot of old-time songs cluttering our minds. They’re not particularly complicated, in fact they are rather simple with a catchy tune. We may not remember all of the words for these nonsense songs, as I call them, but we readily recognize the chorus. Let me give you a couple of other examples.

“Polly Wolly Doodle” – (click for Lyrics)

Oh, I went down South
For to see my Sal
Sing Polly wolly doodle all the day
My Sal, she is
A spunky gal
Sing Polly wolly doodle all the day

Fare thee well,
Fare thee well,
Fare thee well my fairy fay
For I’m going to Lou’siana
For to see my Susy-anna
Singing Polly wolly doodle all the day

(Copyright http://elyrics.net; click for Lyrics)

The song was first published in a Harvard student songbook in 1880. It was used in several movies, including Shirley Temple’s “The Littlest Rebel,” as well as “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” This was another song I remember from childhood.

“I’ve Been Working on the Railroad” (click for Lyrics)
This is an old American folk song first published in 1894.

I’ve been working on the railroad
All the live-long day.
I’ve been working on the railroad
Just to pass the time away.
Can’t you hear the whistle blowing,
Rise up so early in the morn;
Can’t you hear the captain shouting,
“Dinah, blow your horn!”
Dinah, won’t you blow,
Dinah, won’t you blow,
Dinah, won’t you blow your horn?
Dinah, won’t you blow,
Dinah, won’t you blow,
Dinah, won’t you blow your horn?

I don’t know how I came to learn the lyrics for the song, but I did. Maybe it was in kindergarten or on a children’s television show.

“Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay” (click for Lyrics)
The song originated in the 1880’s. Although everyone knows the chorus, “Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay,” I do not know a soul who knows the rest. Even the chorus was bastardized to make a childish joke.

“Buffalo Gals” (click for Lyrics)
This was published back in 1844 by a gentleman named John Hodges. The song was a favorite in western movies, particularly on pianos in saloons. It was also used in Frank Kapra’s iconic movie, “It’s a Wonderful Life,” where George (Jimmy Stewart) and Mary (Donna Reed) sing it as a duet. It was also used as the theme song for the movie. The chorus should be familiar to a lot of people:

Buffalo gals, won’t you come out tonight?
Come out tonight, Come out tonight?
Buffalo gals, won’t you come out tonight,
And dance by the light of the moon.

“Skip to my Lou” (click for Lyrics)
This song dates back at least to the early 19th century, maybe earlier. The song was used in early square dancing and may have originated in Scotland (“Lou” is Scottish for “Love”). “Skip” meant trade partners on the dance floor. The chorus was quite simple:

Skip, skip, skip to my Lou, (3x)
Skip to my Lou, my darlin’.

“Jimmy Crack Corn”
Originated in the 1840’s, probably in the South. Like the rest of the songs herein, we knew the chorus well, but not the rest of the piece.

Jim crack corn I don’t care,
Jim crack corn I don’t care,
Jim crack corn I don’t care,

When I looked this one up, I was surprised to see it was quite racist by today’s standards. So much so, I hesitate to include them herein (you can look it up yourself).

I find the durability of these songs interesting, even though we know them primarily by their chorus lines.

“Daisy Bell” (click for Lyrics)
A classic from the “Gay 90’s” was “Daisy Bell” as composed in 1892 by Harry Dacre. It was made particularly popular in the modern era movie, “2001: A Space Odyssey,” whereby the spaceship’s computer, the HAL 9000, attempts a mutiny and must be shutdown. As it fails, it reverts back to an old song it was taught by its instructor, “Daisy Bell.” The chorus is still familiar to a lot of people:

Daisy, Daisy,
Give me your answer do!
I’m half crazy,
All for the love of you!
It won’t be a stylish marriage,
I can’t afford a carriage
But you’ll look sweet upon the seat
Of a bicycle made for two.

“Witch Doctor” (click for Lyrics)
Produced by David Seville and the Chipmunks in 1958, it became a kid classic over night, primarily due to its chorus of, “Oo ee oo ah ah ting tang walla walla bing bang.” The song did so well, it went on to become number one on the Billboard Hot 100.

“High Hopes” (click for Lyrics)
This became a popular Frank Sinatra song written by Jimmy Van Heusen and lyrics by Sammy Cahn in 1959 for the film, “A Hole in the Head.”

Next time your found, with your chin on the ground
There a lot to be learned, so look around

Just what makes that little old ant
Think he’ll move that rubber tree plant
Anyone knows an ant, can’t
Move a rubber tree plant

But he’s got high hopes, he’s got high hopes
He’s got high apple pie, in the sky hopes

So any time your gettin’ low
‘Stead of lettin’ go
Just remember that ant
Oops there goes another rubber tree plant

The song became incredibly popular not just with grownups, but with children as well.

None of these tunes were particularly complicated, just simple songs to brighten our day. These were not children’s rhymes but legitimate adult songs that were playful in nature. Their strength was in their catchy wordplay. More than anything, they were designed for simple fun, and not to make a statement of any kind. As such, they tend to stay with you longer than you think. The fact I was humming, “Boop boop dit-tem dat-tem what-tem Chu!” over fifty years after I learned it should denote its durability.

It’s interesting how we clutter our minds. Besides, they were all the “Bee’s Knees!”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  WHO HAS GOT YOUR BACK? – A lesson of loyalty in the workplace, and in life.

LAST TIME:  THE MEANING OF TRAITOR  – Another history lesson for our youth; Benedict Arnold and today’s terrorists.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Life, Music | Tagged: , , , , | 5 Comments »

THE MEANING OF TRAITOR

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 24, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- Another history lesson for our youth; Benedict Arnold and today’s terrorists.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

234 years ago today (Sep 24th), Benedict Arnold deserted the American Army and joined the British during the Revolutionary War. By doing so, he became the national icon for the word “traitor.” I mention this because 18th century American history is rarely taught anymore in High Schools, and Arnold’s name has slowly been fading into obscurity. Ask your children or grandchildren about Arnold and you will likely get blank stares.

Arnold’s story is rather interesting. Born in Connecticut, he became a successful businessman and developed a lucrative trade between New England and the West Indies. In 1775 he was appointed Captain in Connecticut’s militia. With the outbreak of war in Massachusetts, his company marched to Boston and helped defend the city from the British siege. Arnold was ambitious and participated nobly in several raids. He is perhaps best known for the capture of Fort Ticonderoga. In the Autumn of 1775 he and his troops embarked on a difficult mission through the wilderness (present-day Maine) to assault Quebec City. He lost almost half of his men due to inclement weather. Due to the layout of the city, its defenses, and Arnold’s diminished manpower, he failed to take the city and shattered his left leg in the process, which would bother him for the remainder of his life. For his efforts though, he was commissioned a brigadier general.

He was assigned other responsibilities, including the defense of Rhode Island. Despite his successes, he was passed over for promotion while others took credit for some of his accomplishments. He was accused and investigated for financial corruption, and eventually cleared of the charges. Nonetheless, he was embarrassed and tried to resign his commission, but Washington rejected it.

Arnold re-injured his left leg at the Battle of Ridgefield (CT). After recovering from it, he rejoined General Washington’s troops at Valley Forge. There, as a sign of loyalty to the fledgling country, Arnold joined other soldiers in the first recorded Oath of Allegiance:

I “Benedict Arnold Major General”, do acknowledge the UNITED STATES of AMERICA to be Free, Independent and Sovereign States, and declare the the people thereof owe no allegiance or obedience to George the Third, King of Great-Britain; and I renounce, refute and abjure any allegiance or obedience to him; and I do “swear” that I will, to the utmost of my power, support, maintain and defend the said United States against the said King George the Third, his heirs and successors, and his or their abettors, assistants and adherents, and will serve the said United States in the office of “Major General” which I now hold, with fidelity, according to the best of my skill and understanding.
– Sworn before me this 30th, May 1778 at the Artillery and Tank Valley Forge
Hinay B.E. Alslels

At this point, Arnold was held in high esteem by his troops, and trusted by Washington who put him in charge of the defenses at West Point and the Hudson River, the main waterway going into New York. However, Arnold became disenchanted with the Colonial cause. He disliked the alliance with France and the Congress’ rejection of Great Britain’s 1778 proposal to grant self-governance with the colonies. Frustrated and discouraged, he opened secret negotiations with the British to switch sides. The plan was to diminish the defenses in the area and allow the British to capture West Point, a very strategic location overlooking the Hudson.

The plot was foiled when American forces captured Major John André, the British spy chief, who was caught carrying papers revealing the plot. Learning of André’s capture, Arnold fled down the Hudson River to the British sloop-of-war “Vulture.” Alerted to the plot, Washington had sent soldiers to apprehend Arnold, but he narrowly escaped. For his part, André was hanged.

Now on the British side, Arnold was given a commission as a brigadier general in the Army. He would go on to lead British forces against his former countrymen on raids in Virginia and his home state of Connecticut.

After the war, Arnold would return to the merchant business operating out of Saint John, New Brunswick. He would eventually move to London in 1791 where he died just ten years later at the age of 60. Arnold’s body was buried in London, but was accidentally moved a century later to an unmarked mass grave.

Following the war, Arnold’s name quickly became synonymous with “traitor.” Benjamin Franklin typified the country’s sentiments when he wrote, “Judas sold only one man, Arnold three millions.”

In Arnold, we see a man who was bold, ambitious, and a talented leader. Despite taking the Military Oath of Allegiance though, he reneged on his obligations in search of self interests. Regardless, his name will always be linked to betrayal.

Now, 234 years later, we are embroiled in another conflict, this time in the Middle East with ISIS, a militant Muslim extremist group. Its soldiers are recruited from around the world, including Americans who are leaving to fight in Syria and Iraq, and are willing to wage war against American soldiers and their allies. Make no mistake, these people are just as traitorous as Arnold, and should be treated as such in return. No, they shouldn’t be welcomed back to our country with open arms. They shouldn’t be allowed back in the country at all. Consider this, had Washington’s troops captured Arnold, he would have likely joined André on the hangman’s gallows. Traitors have no place in these United States.

Such is our history lesson for today.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  NONSENSE SONGS – It is interesting what we remember.

LAST TIME:  THERE IS MEANING IN YOUR HANDSHAKE  – It is not a frivolous gesture, but represents something significant; your word.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in History, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 11 Comments »

THERE IS MEANING IN YOUR HANDSHAKE

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 22, 2014

BRYCE ON LIFE

- It is not a frivolous gesture, but represents something significant; your word.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

If you haven’t noticed, the handshake has been slowly going the way of the Dodo bird. If you watch sporting events, particularly at the youth level, you are more likely to see fist “bumps” or the slapping of hands as opposed to a genuine handshake. These variations of the handshake likely came from pop culture.

The handshake originated from Medieval times when combatants would greet each other with open hands, thereby indicating they were not holding any weapons and could be trusted. Over the years it has evolved into a single hand as opposed to both. With this background in mind, I always believed in giving a firm handshake and look the other person square in the eye. I am not a fan of limp-wrested handshakes, nor do I like a vice-grip shake denoting a contest of some kind. “Glad-handers” are those who work the room saying hello to everyone but not making eye contact; politicians are notorious for this.

When my son came of age, I taught him how to shake hands and greet someone. I believe he still offers a good handshake. These are things fathers need to pass on to their sons, and daughters as well.

The handshake used to mean something meaningful, specifically, your word. For years, a handshake was as good as a contract. Evidently, not so anymore. I have a friend who recently wanted to sell his Les Paul guitar. He went down to the local music store and negotiated a deal with the proprietor to sell it for him. Once they came to an arrangement, they shook on it. This surprised the proprietor who asked my friend, “Don’t you want a contract?”

My friend responded, “Do we understand each other about the terms?”

“Yes,” the owner replied.

“Is your word your bond?” my friend asked.

“Yes.”

“Then we have a deal don’t we?”

The proprietor was taken aback and commented to my friend how this seemed unusual to him. Refreshing, but unusual. He claimed most of the young musicians frequenting his shop wanted some form of contract, and didn’t comprehend the concept of a handshake. I’m not sure why this is, I can only suspect the influence of lawyers. However, if you do not trust the person you are going to do business with, then it will not matter whether it is a written contract or a handshake. In my friend’s case, which wasn’t exactly a major business transaction, it worked out to be a mutually agreeable arrangement.

Back in the mid-1970’s, when we first started doing business in Japan, a delegation from Tokyo approached us to serve as our representatives. We found the Japanese to be tough negotiators, but after we came to consensus, a handshake was all that was necessary to seal the deal. We, of course, signed an agreement later spelling out the terms, but this was nothing more than a formality. Over the many years we did business in Japan, not once did we ever refer back to the paper agreement, just the handshake.

The declining value of the handshake represents another indication of the erosion of our morality. It means we no longer trust each other and are suspicious of the other person’s intentions. Some people will shake, slap, or bump anyone. Not me. If I do not trust you, I certainly will not shake your hand, just as the Medieval combatants wouldn’t. To me, I place a lot of value in the handshake. I would hate to believe that people today think of it as nothing more than a frivolous gesture or as a means to transmit germs.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  THE MEANING OF TRAITOR – Another history lesson for our youth; Benedict Arnold and today’s terrorists.

LAST TIME:  COUNTING OUR BLESSINGS  – Do not despair, try writing a list of the positive things in life instead.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 8 Comments »

COUNTING OUR BLESSINGS

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 19, 2014

BRYCE ON LIFE

- Do not despair, try writing a list of the positive things in life instead.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I was having a cigar with a good friend recently where we were lamenting about the state of affairs in our government, business, and the country in general. It’s easy to be negative when events do not turn out as you expect them. However, I made the observation people tend to overlook the blessings in their lives, those events, however large or trifle, somehow had a profound effect on our lives. I then started to enumerate mine:

FAMILY – I was fortunate to know both sets of my grandparents, and one set of great-grandparents. I listened and learned from them. My parents were go-getters in business and in life generally; they were a hard act to follow. I was incredibly fortunate to find a wonderful woman who has put up with me for over 30 years. I quickly discovered when you take a wife, you also take her family and I’ve enjoyed getting to know her side. More importantly, I was present for the birth of my children, which was a life altering experience for me. To watch them grow up to become fine people, and graduate from school, that is hard to top. Both my wife and I made an effort to become an important part of their lives. It may have been hard work, but it was certainly rewarding.

ENTERTAINMENT – I was lucky to see the Beatles on Ed Sullivan in 1964 and watch their “Mania” turn into a phenomenon. Although I saw many rockers over the years, in 1968, I had the rare privilege of seeing Jimi Hendrix in Cincinnati and Rock and Roll was never the same for me. I also enjoyed different tastes in music and was lucky to have seen Frank Sinatra in person near the end of his career. I visited Las Vegas before it grew into a family environment and saw some great acts, including Don Rickles and the Smothers Brothers in their prime.

SPORTS – As a youth I watched hockey, basketball, football, baseball, and the Olympics. In football, two players left an indelible impression on me, Joe Namath of the Jets (offense), and Dick Butkus of the Bears (defense), both revolutionized the game. I also have fond memories of our High School football team, not just winning games but the camaraderie involved with teamwork. To this day, I occasionally have dreams of “suiting up” for a game. As to baseball, I was a Yankee fan as a kid (early 1960’s), but more importantly, I was privileged to witness the rise of the Big Red Machine in Cincinnati, culminating in World Series championships in 1975 and 1976. They had four MVPs on the team, a multitude of Golden Gloves and Silver Bats, many All-Stars, and four Hall of Famers (including Rose). I do not believe the world will ever see another team like this again, which is why my interest in baseball is waning. I was also privileged to coach Little League over the years, both boys and girls, and watch my kids grow into fine adults. One last thing, I was lucky to see the great racehorse, Secretariat, in the Kentucky Derby.

FISHING – I fished a lot in the streams of Connecticut as a kid, and did my share of salt water fishing, but it all pales in comparison to fly-fishing in a fresh water stream. I have had the rare opportunity to fly-fish in various parts of the country. North Carolina is where I currently fish, but I have a special place in my heart for Montana.

SPACE – I grew up watching NASA’s Mercury program and knew the names of all of the astronauts. This was followed by the Gemini and Apollo programs, culminating with landing on the moon by the crew of Apollo 11 in July 1969. The world was transfixed on the landing, including our household where we watched it on a black and white television set.

SIMPLE JOYS – Simple things have always taken precedence with me over opulent toys and technology. I’ve always been one to enjoy good conversation, a good hand-rolled Maduro cigar, and single malt whiskey which I discovered in 1978 in the Hotel Melbourne in Australia. Thanks Paul.

BUSINESS – Due to the nature of our business, I have been fortunate to meet with some of the true pioneers of systems and computing, including Les Matthies (the “Dean of Systems”), Tom Richley (the developer of the TOTAL DBMS), Michael Jackson (structured programming), and Robert W. Bemer (the inventor of ASCII code). Since our company worked with everything from mainframes to PC’s, people ask me what was my favorite computer. Some might be surprised to learn it was the DEC VAX/VMS mini which was way ahead of its time.

Beyond this, I was fortunate to have met a lot of people around the world through our consulting practice. Everyone from the executives in the boardroom to the people working in the trenches. I have met my fair share of charlatans, crooks, and just plain despicable people, but I’ve also met a lot of good stand-up people who wanted to make a difference. Although I’ve visited a lot of places, I have a fondness for Japan. Besides, they play great baseball there.

Our “PRIDE” product line revolutionized the systems world and opened the door to hundreds of competitors. I was fortunate to have been actively involved in the development of our Enterprise Engineering Methodology, Computer Aided Planning tool, and Automated Systems Engineering tool. Such inventions, along with my other consulting activities, gave me a rewarding sense of accomplishment.

POLITICS – Our High School class met Richard Nixon in 1971 in Washington, DC where he provided a tour of the White House for us. One year later I would be campaigning for him on my college campus. It was 1972 when the voting age was lowered to 18, and my class was proud of this designation. Since then, I haven’t missed an election.

MASONS – I was pleased to be raised a Master Mason several years ago, following in the footsteps of my father and grandfather. Although the fraternity is fraught with petty politics, as most organizations are, I have been pleased to meet some upstanding men of character along the way.

FRIENDS – When I was growing up, we moved around a lot. Along the way, I learned to cultivate a set of friends. Thanks to social media, I am still in touch with many of them even though they live far away. Most seem to enjoy a good cigar as I do. Even though I haven’t seen them in quite some time, I know I can lift up the phone and call them, and it would be like old times. Having a good friend you can trust and level with is priceless.

Some people measure their existence by the accolades and awards they receive or the expensive toys they wear or drive. I think it is a lot simpler than this. Instead, we should relish the special events we witness and the people in our lives. To be able to see the Big Red Machine or Neil Armstrong standing on the lunar surface is priceless, as is the birth of your children. These are epochal events affecting our character, priorities, and perspective on life. They do not come along often which is why we should savor them when they do.

Next time you get disillusioned with life, try writing a list of your blessings. As Clarence said, “You see George, you really had a wonderful life.”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  THERE IS MEANING IN YOUR HANDSHAKE – It is not a frivolous gesture, but represents something significant; your word.

LAST TIME:  WHAT ARE YOUR RIGHTS (OR IS IT WRONGS?)  – The misconceptions Americans have related to our personal rights.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 5 Comments »

WHAT ARE YOUR RIGHTS (OR IS IT WRONGS?)

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 17, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- The misconceptions Americans have related to our personal rights.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

The Declaration of Independence was the first of our governing documents indicating the types of “rights” Americans possess, and where they come from:

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Here, the founding fathers suggest such rights are heaven sent, that they represent the fundamental rights God intended man to have.

The US Constitution goes a step further with its accompanying Bill of Rights, where our founding fathers spelled out our rights as citizens. It initially included ten amendments specifying our rights, such as freedom of speech and religion, the right to bear arms, to be free of unreasonable search, a right to a speedy and public trial, a trial by an impartial jury, a right to confront witnesses, and more. There is now a total of 27 such amendments, with the exception of the 18th prohibiting the manufacturing of alcohol (which was repealed in 1933 by the 21st Amendment).

Interestingly, many Americans believe they have more rights, which they do not. Because of naivety, and laws enacted to support welfare, Americans believe they are entitled to such things as:

* The right to a job – Many young people today believe they are entitled to a job following completion of their education. Just because you possess a college degree does not entitle you to a job.

* The right to a promotion or raise – regardless of the time you work for a company, you are not entitled to a promotion. Normally, this depends on the work ethic you have exhibited as an employee, and available financial resources.

* The right to a second chance. In business, if you make a mistake, rarely are you allowed a “do-over.” It is therefore necessary for you to try and do a professional job as much as possible. Although some bosses may be lenient, particularly if you are a “newbie” in the company, one mistake may cost you your job. Also remember, “three strikes and you are out.”

* The right to higher education – the harsh reality is higher education is a privilege, not a right. Whereas primary and secondary education is paid for by the tax payer, higher education runs more like a business and, as such, must be paid for by the individual, not the public. In most states, you must attend school until you are 16 years of age. After that, it is optional. For those with no interest in school or disrupt the harmony of the school for others, I suggest they be discharged immediately as they are not only wasting their time, but that of the teachers and administrators, not to mention the other students. Forcing them to attend school is detrimental to education.

* The right to free stuff. The welfare system was originally designed as a safety net to help people should they fail in business or become impaired. Unfortunately, many people abuse the system as opposed to going back to work. They know all of the quirks in our system, whereby they enjoy all of the perks government is willing to provide, such as housing, food, transportation, health care, cell phones, daycare services, and more. Such people no longer are grateful for such generosity, but feel they are entitled to it. The truth is, the government provides a helping hand, but the person must endeavor not to become a ward of the state. They must become a responsible member of society, lead a meaningful and productive life, and enjoy the benefits of freedom, not slavery.

* The right to do whatever we want. We have defined a multitude of laws and regulationS for everything from minor infractions to major indiscretions. Nonetheless, there are people who believe such rules do not apply to them. As such, they feel free to rob, steal, cheat, slander, murder, intimidate, commit bodily harm, etc. These are certainly not “freedom fighters” but rather common criminals which can be found throughout our social strata.

* The right to become citizens. If you are willing to come to this country legally, follow its rules, speak the language, and willing to take the test and Naturalization Oath of Allegiance, then, Yes, you have the right to become a citizen. All others, No.

* The right to vote. If you are 18 years of age or older, have registered to vote, and can prove your identity at your voting precinct, Yes, you have the right to vote. Actually, I would like to see this expanded that the voter has passed a certification test of some kind, such as the test taken by immigrants wanting to become citizens.

We also have the right to like or dislike people, places and things; believe or reject what people say, and; enjoy or reject simple pleasures, such as the movies, music, art, food, etc.

The truth is, in America we only have a handful of rights, most are fabricated by our popular culture and the media. Entitlements are certainly not rights. Our most precious and fundamental rights are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness as endowed by our Creator. To deny the existence of the Creator, is to deny these fundamental rights.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  COUNTING OUR BLESSINGS – Do not despair, try writing a list of the positive things in life instead.

LAST TIME:  POLITICAL STREET SIGNS  – Eyesores or useful tools for candidates?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 8 Comments »

POLITICAL STREET SIGNS

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 15, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- Eyesores or useful tools for candidates?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

As we get closer to election day in November, political street signs are popping up everywhere. The signs began to appear early in the summer as a prelude to primary season. Now there is a morass of signs extending from one end of the county to the other. Although there are congressional races in the offing, most signs are related to municipal and county races, such as county commissioners, school boards, mayoral, and judges.

Since most people do not take the time to study the issues, these street signs are incredibly important to cultivate the image of the candidates. The color of the signs and fonts are just as important as the message printed on them. In my area, there doesn’t appear to be any signs in black and white. Most have a color theme, either a patriotic red, white and blue, or a simple two color sign to cut down on printing expenses. I have seen green and white to represent Eco-friendly themes, but they are somewhat difficult to read. Orange and blue is another popular combination, but somehow it reminds me of the Denver Broncos.

The two hottest colors, that which attracts the eye, are yellow and red, yet these are avoided for some reason. Maybe they do not want to be too loud.

Democrats like blue signs and Republicans lean to red. The American flag is a common icon to reflect the patriotism of the candidate. For judges, it is common to see icons such as a gavel or a scale of justice. Law enforcement candidates tend to use handcuffs, fire department candidates use fire helmets, and school board candidates use a simple school logo. I wonder what icon they would use for dog catcher?

Personally, I like to see pictures of the candidates on the signs but this is typically avoided as name recognition is of paramount importance. After all, you only see names on a ballot, not photos of the candidates.

Because a street sign is typically limited in terms of space, it has to say just three things:

1. The candidate’s name, particularly the last name.
2. The office he/she is running for.
3. The party he/she represents.

Optional: a catchy slogan or motto is useful for conveying a message, or possibly an important endorsement, e.g., “FOP supports Chief So-and-so.” Or perhaps a web address is shown.

Where the political signs lose their effectiveness is when they are either bunched together in a single location or one right after another on a street median. At this point, drivers see nothing but a blur and the signs are indistinguishable.

Signs frequently get vandalized, even in the best of neighborhoods. In some developments, including my own, such signs are banned from display in order to maintain harmony. Inevitably, some nut job will put out a sign in spite of the deed restrictions, thereby causing the neighbors to complain and retaliate by displaying signs of competing candidates. Aside from this, when signs are deliberately vandalized or stolen, this is a crime, plain and simple. I may intensely dislike a candidate or issue, but I respect his/her first amendment right to display it. However, when the election is over, regardless of who won or lost, please take down the eyesores. I do not want to see them at Thanksgiving or Christmas.

A few years ago I was visiting some friends in Ohio just prior to the elections there. As I was driving around I came upon a sign saying “Dinkelacker for Judge.” With all due respect to the judge, I burst out laughing when I read the name for the first time. Since his first name was omitted from the sign, I pondered what it might be; could it be Dicky Dinkelacker? Donny Dinkelacker? Or maybe it was a woman, Denise Dinkelacker? Debbie Dinkelacker? I went on and on with the combinations which seemed endless. To this day, I still do not know his first name, but why should I? His last name has been indelibly impressed on my mind. The fact I remember it is indicative of how important a last name can be. I know I won’t be forgetting it anytime soon.

It is a shame we have to stoop to using street signs. In a perfect world the voters would meet and listen to the candidates and study the issues before forming an opinion, but as we all know, this seldom happens, which is why we have to rely on street signs that create eyesores, and names like Dinkelacker.

How about Denzel Dinkelacker? Or Darnell Dinkelacker? Daphne? Dizzy? Doreen? Dilbert?

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  WHAT ARE YOUR RIGHTS (OR IS IT WRONGS?) – The misconceptions Americans have related to our personal rights.

LAST TIME:  ARE WE BECOMING A GODLESS COUNTRY?  – What the “separation of church and state” really means.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

ARE WE BECOMING A GODLESS COUNTRY?

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 12, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS & RELIGION

- What the “separation of church and state” really means.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

For some reason, Americans believe there is a legal requirement to separate church and state in the US Constitution. It is now commonly believed organized religion has no business in the workings of the state. The reality is, there is no such stipulation whatsoever in the Constitution. There is only a couple of references to religion in our governing documents. The first is in Article 6 of the Constitution whereby “…no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.” The second reference is in Amendment One of the Bill of Rights whereby, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;…” I cannot speak for the governing documents of the various states and territories, but as far as the Constitution is concerned, that is all there is pertaining to religion.

So where does this presumption of separation come from? Two places: other countries who embrace such a concept, but more importantly in a letter written by Thomas Jefferson in 1802 to Baptists regarding the 1st amendment. Jefferson was president at the time and well known as author of the Declaration of Independence (but not the Constitution; that was Madison). In the letter, Jefferson wrote:

“Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between Man & his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legitimate powers of government reach actions only, & not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should “make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof”, thus building a wall of separation between Church & State.”

By this letter to the Baptists, Jefferson meant that the United States would not establish a national church. This letter greatly influenced Supreme Court decisions. Keep in mind, Jefferson is speaking on another matter altogether and he is writing as president, not as a justice of the Supreme Court who should rightfully interpret the separation issue. However, for some strange reason, the letter was used to define the separation issue. In Everson vs. Board of Education in 1947, the Supreme Court used a portion of the letter (eight words only) and interpreted it to mean, “The First Amendment has erected ‘a wall of separation between church and state.’ That wall must be kept high and impregnable.” How they came to this conclusion mystifies Constitutional scholars to this day. It is interesting the Supreme Court based its conclusion on an interpretation of a letter, not the Constitution itself.

Based on this Supreme Court decision, atheists and attorneys have used this as a means to drive God out of our country. Today, we hear of football teams prohibited from saying a nondenominational prayer before or after a game, Christmas trees have been banned from schools, students are being suspended for saying “bless you” after hearing someone sneeze, there are movements to remove anything pertaining to God out of government buildings, and there is even an attack on our national motto, “In God we Trust.”

The latest attack on God is found in the US Navy where atheists started a movement to remove Gideon Bibles from Navy lodges. These Bibles were provided for the comfort of sailors staying at the lodges. The removal of the Bibles created a furor when it was reported in the press. So much so, the Navy ordered the Gideon Bibles returned back into the lodge rooms.

Make no mistake, Christianity is under attack here, not Judaism, Islam, or even witchcraft, and it appears to be a concerted effort. Some contend it is intended to undermine the country as Christianity played an important role in the founding of America. Whatever the reason, we must beware of such attacks and be prepared to repel them,

If by some chance, our opponents are successful in eradicating God in the federal government, I am one of those who believe all federal employees should work on Christmas Day, particularly postal workers.

Is there really a separation of church and state in the Constitution? No, but it will be necessary to bring a lawsuit to the Supreme Court to overturn their 1947 misinterpretation.

I pray we do not become a Godless country. Without God, the country will fall.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Even Sky Masterson read the Gideon Bible, as did Rocky Raccoon.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  POLITICAL STREET SIGNS – Eyesores or useful tools for candidates?

LAST TIME:  THE HARSH REALITY OF THE WAR ON TERROR  – It’s not going away any time soon.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics, Religion | Tagged: , , , , | 17 Comments »

THE HARSH REALITY OF THE WAR ON TERROR

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 10, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- It’s not going away any time soon.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

President Obama would have us believe the War on Terror (WOT) is over and that America won. Nothing could be further from the truth. The WOT is admittedly an unconventional war, as there wasn’t any formal declaration, but we have been engaged in it since 9-11, making it 13 years old and the longest war in our history. And the ugly truth is, we will not be getting out of it any time soon.

The WOT is obviously not a typical war in the sense of battle lines, tactical military strategy, and sophisticated equipment. Instead, it is a terrorist campaign where we play defense while our opponents play offense. More importantly, it is necessary to acknowledge we are engaged in a religious war with the Muslims. The fact we are Americans is less important than we are perceived as infidels, the non-believers, and the perceived enemies of Islam. This means it will never end as long as there are Muslim fanatics.

Some will say, “What about the good Muslims, those who do not believe in Jihad?” Those who do not condemn the terrorist actions are encouraging the terrorists through their inaction. It would be an interesting experiment to ask Muslims in enclaves like Dearborn, Michigan to sign a petition condemning Muslim terrorism.

Let us also consider how Muslims have immigrated, some would say infiltrated, not just the United States, but the United Kingdom, Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, and the Netherlands, where they have become vocal about changing local laws to adapt to Sharia Law. This has become of great concern to those of us who are happy with our existing laws. Slowly though, Muslims are joining local governments to exert such influence. It has also been said there are Muslims in the Federal Government as well, including the White House. This has become rather unnerving to citizens.

Muslim extremists will not be happy until the western world has capitulated to Islam, regardless how long it might take. This means the WOT will continue unabated and a flash point is inevitable, such as targeting another American icon (e.g., Statue of Liberty, Hoover Dam, Mount Rushmore, etc.) or perhaps something more diabolical such as destroying our electrical grid, capturing or killing our government, or igniting a nuclear device on our shores. Whatever it is, we will again find ourselves having to make some hard decisions as to how to respond.

Should this happen, do not be surprised if Muslims in this country are rounded up and interred in camps as we did with the Japanese-Americans in World War II or perhaps deported to the Middle East. The anger by the American people after such a cataclysmic event will be such that all Muslims will live in fear of our response.

The WOT will not stop until the Muslim extremists either call for a cessation of violence or they are eradicated completely. That is the harsh reality we must all live with.

(Also, see “The War on Terror” (Apr 19, 2010))

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  ARE WE BECOMING A GODLESS COUNTRY? – What the “separation of church and state” really means.

LAST TIME:  THE DISAPPEARING MIDDLE CLASS  – And how energy independence can alleviate the problem.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 12 Comments »

THE DISAPPEARING MIDDLE CLASS

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 8, 2014

BRYCE ON THE ECONOMY

- And how energy independence can alleviate the problem.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)

To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I recently read a couple of articles regarding the shrinking American middle class. It seems the rich get richer and the poor are doing much better thanks to escalated welfare spending, but the middle class is struggling.

The middle class is an important part of our country both economically and politically. They represent the engine which fuels the economy. They purchase the consumer products, the homes, food, automobiles, and pay the lion’s share of the taxes. The upper class also pays taxes, but not to the degree of the middle class. The poor, of course, contribute nothing.

According to “Forbes,” 60% of middle class American households have experienced a decrease in income. As the Middle Class diminishes, the poor will inevitably feel the squeeze. Politically, it is not the rich or the poor who run the country, it is the Middle Class. The rich are active politically, but it is the Middle Class, representing the land owners and consumers who ultimately dictate the course of the country politically. The poor doesn’t really figure in the formula as they are the most apathetic of voters.

As Aristotle noted centuries ago, “The most perfect political community must be amongst those who are in the middle rank, and those states are best instituted wherein these are a larger and more respectable part, if possible, than both the other; or, if that cannot be, at least than either of them separate.”

As the upper and lower classes expand beyond the size of the middle, anarchy will likely ensue. This has been demonstrated in numerous countries around the world. It also means the Middle Class must be allowed to flourish. To do so, we need an increase in full-time jobs, not part-time. Currently, the Obama administration is pushing for an increase in the minimum wage. Can we not achieve the same goal by lowering costs as opposed to raising the minimum wage? According to the government, inflation is at a paltry 2%. Hardly worth worrying about, right? Interestingly, the price of gasoline is not included in their equation. This is strange as delivery costs affect everything. In reality, we have a much higher inflation rate than the government is willing to admit. I would therefore argue:

DON’T RAISE THE MINIMUM WAGE, LOWER THE PRICE OF OIL!

Our priorities are wrong, instead of raising capital, let’s cut spending instead. Unfortunately, this is not a popular concept with the current administration. However, if we dedicated ourselves to energy independence, we would lower the cost of living, thereby putting more money in everyone’s pocket. In addition, we wouldn’t threaten the closure of businesses, but encourage expansion, and lastly, we would be creating legitimate full-time jobs, not just flipping burgers.

Let’s not kid ourselves, spiraling inflation is the real culprit here, based on the rising cost of energy. It’s the ugly little secret the government doesn’t want you to know. However, if we pronounced a national objective of energy independence, we would be stoking the engine of the middle class, not to mention freeing ourselves from entanglements in the Middle East. We obviously have ample resources and technology to achieve the goal, but we seem to lack the will to do so, e.g., the Keystone XL pipeline, the New England pipeline, and the massive gas field in Pennsylvania.

This is all very real and all very plausible, but we either lack the vision to tackle this goal or there is a premeditated attempt to dismantel the country. Let’s be clear about one thing, if the middle class continues to decline, it puts us on a clear path to destruction. Don’t let anybody tell you otherwise.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  THE HARSH REALITY OF THE WAR ON TERROR – It’s not going away any time soon.

LAST TIME:  RETIREMENTLAND  – Do we ever truly retire?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Economics, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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