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BOM PROJECT ESTIMATING

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 30, 2015

BRYCE ON PROJECT MANAGEMENT

- If Bill of Materials is good enough for engineering and architecture, why not systems and programming?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Estimating is one of the most controversial subjects in project management. There are some people who have turned the subject into a cryptic science involving esoteric techniques.

Estimating is simply the process used to determine the amount of effort and cost required to implement a project, in part or in full. It is important to acknowledge that estimating is fundamentally an effort at projecting the future. Like all projections, the more facts and information available, the better the estimate. There is a natural human tendency to avoid making estimates because estimates represent commitments, and people tend to shy away from commitments, particularly when they are not sure of the facts. Nevertheless, little progress would be made if we never attempted to plan for the future.

Most estimating errors are errors of omission, not commission. It is what we forget to estimate that often leads to problems. Methodologies, with their defined structure, materially assists with eliminating some of the unknowns when estimating. They provide frameworks and structures acting as checklists for estimating. Methodologies isolate the activities to be performed into small enough increments, thereby minimizing the margin of error.

An estimate improves in accuracy in direct relation to the level of detail considered. A methodology defines the sequence of events by which parts are assembled. For example, a construction methodology identifies all of the resources of a product, such as lumber, steel, glass, etc. and how they are assembled. An Information Systems related methodology, such as “PRIDE”-ISEM, specifies the sequence by which data elements, records, files, inputs, outputs, processes, etc. are assembled. This provides the ability to use a “bill of materials” (BOM) technique to count all of the resources in the product and develop an estimate for the project, in part or in full, based on the standards developed for completing and/or installing a resource. This is why “PRIDE” methodologies put an emphasis on “rough designs” in the early phases of work.

To better understand the BOM concept, consider all products are composed of a variety of parts, be it electronics, automobiles, airplanes, ships, bridges, skyscrapers, homes, etc. Using BOM, the various components are identified and related to the other parts they will be attached. To illustrate, here is a lawn mower showing all of the parts, identified by number and name, along with their relationships:

Such illustrations can typically be found in most product warranty guides. Obviously, BOM is an old concept used by engineers and architects for many years, but they can also be applied to information systems involving sub-systems (business processes), procedures (both administrative and computer), programs, files, inputs, outputs, records, and data elements. It can also be used in programming components, such as modules. To think of systems in this manner is somewhat of a revolutionary concept.

From such designs, the Project Manager is asked to consider:

* The number and types of NEW components to be created.
* The number and type of existing components requiring MODIFICATION.
* The number and type of existing components that can be RE-USED as is (no modification required).

To illustrate, in a “PRIDE”-ISEM Project (Phase 1), a complete “rough design” of the envisioned system is produced in Activity F. In Activity G, the Project Manager takes the rough design and makes the following type of assessment:

COMPONENTS NEW MODIFY RE-USE
SYSTEM 1
SUB-SYSTEMS 14
ADMIN PROC 23
COMP PROC 13
PROGRAMS 28
MODULES 33 10 112
INPUTS 17 5
OUTPUTS 37 13
FILES 56 5 43
RECORDS 250 50 306
DATA ELEMENTS 60 257

This analysis is essentially no different than other products consisting of different components, such as circuit boards, chips, nails, screws, lumber, girders, glass, gaskets, pistons, etc.

In systems, the rough design is used as the road map for the project (in the above example, there will have to be 14 Phases 3-7 because there are 14 sub-systems and 13 Phase 4-II & 6 for the 13 computer procedures, and at least 28 Phase 5’s for the programs). It is also the basis for the project estimate. Such estimating is greatly facilitated through the use of an IRM Repository which controls the components and, as such, acts like a Bill of Materials Processor (BOMP).

The BOM concept permits the establishment and application of estimating guidelines. To illustrate; how much direct time does it take to weld a six inch pipe? Define a data element? Design a sub-system? Such standards should be based on whole work (Direct Time) as opposed to including interferences (Indirect Time). Indirect time is a part of the work environment and can vary from company to company, group to group, even person to person. Estimating, therefore, must be accomplished using Direct hours only.

Having standards in place, we can then consider variations based on the skills of the worker. For example, how long it takes a novice worker to weld a product will certainly be longer than an expert. The same is true in systems analysis and programming. This is where a Skills Inventory comes in handy to select the appropriate worker for a project assignment.

By making system designers build a rough design of the product early in a project, the bill of materials can be populated accordingly and greatly improve estimating accuracy. As the project progresses, and changes are identified in the product structure, revisions in estimates can be easily made.

This is all made possible by using an engineering/manufacturing approach in the design and development of products, including systems.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  44 YEARS OF “PRIDE” – and the lessons we have learned.

LAST TIME:  YOU’RE FROM WHERE?  – America is a country separated by a common language.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Project Management | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

YOU’RE FROM WHERE?

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 27, 2015

BRYCE ON LIFE

- America is a country separated by a common language.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

As I was growing up my father moved the family around quite a bit due to the nature of his work (he was a pioneer in the systems and computer industry). My grade school years were predominantly spent in the Northeast (Delaware, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and New York), except for a stint in California where we were told on more than one occasion we spoke with a distinct East Coast accent. I didn’t think much of it at first, but I started to keep track of the peculiarities of our language. When we moved to Chicago, again we were told of our East Coast affliction, but when we moved to Cincinnati, the “Gateway to the South,” we were told that we now had a hard Midwest accent. Eventually we moved our business down to Florida which is actually an amalgamation of many accents as people from just about everywhere move here. I suppose I now possess a “Heinz 57 Varieties” of American dialects.

Accents can be both charming and confusing at the same time. Aside from this, there are other expressions we use which distinguishes people from one geographical location to another. For example, the dialect of people from Boston is distinct and well known, but there is one word the computer people there use that I have not seen elsewhere; instead of the word “data” (pronounced “day-tah”) they will say “dater” (“day-ter”) which is a bit baffling and very unique to the area.

In Cincinnati (pronounced “sin-sin-at-ee”) natives are more inclined to say “Cincinnata” (“sin-sin-at-ah”), but the real distinguishable idiosyncrasy of people from the “Queen City” is their constant use of the word “please.” Instead of just using it to request something, it is commonly used when someone doesn’t understand something in a conversation; instead of “I beg your pardon” or “Could you repeat that?” or simply “Huh?” Cincinnatians will say “Please?” I have found this to be very unique to Cincinnati. No other city in Ohio, including nearby Dayton, uses “please” in this manner, making it a very distinct characteristic of Cincinnatians.

I don’t remember any particular expression in Chicago other than they commonly use the expression “Chicagoland” to refer to the general metropolitan area. I know of no other city that does this. You’ll hear “Chicagoland” primarily used in television and radio commercials, as well as print advertisements. As an outsider moving to Chicago, I thought it sounded rather pompous, making Chicago seem like it was a separate country or at least the Ponderosa.

Australia has a distinct accent and the natives are quick to point out the dissimilarities between an Australian accent, and those from the UK and South Africa. Most Americans cannot hear the differences at first, but if you listen carefully there are distinct differences. One word that caught my attention down-under is the use of the word “rubber”; whereas Americans tend to refer to this as a prophylactic, Australians use it to refer to an eraser, such as on a pencil. Note to male Australians visiting corporate offices in the United States: do not ask an American female for a rubber, you might be accused of sexual harassment.

I’ve been to Canada many times and there are several expressions unique to our neighbors in the north, primarily Ontario. “Eh?” is perhaps the most commonly used word in their vernacular and is shorthand for “Don’t you agree?” or “I beg your pardon?” Aside from this, words like “out” and “about” sound more like “ewt” and “a-boot.” If you are a project manager, it is not uncommon to say “shed-ule” and “pro-jecht” as opposed to “Schedule” and “project.”

Here in the South, natives will talk with long drawls, kind of like Huckleberry Hound, but just about everyone says “Y’all” (“You all”) including displaced Yankees who have migrated here (as well as yours truly). “Y’all” is so popular, I’m convinced it’s contagious.

I have only scratched the surface here of local idiosyncrasies. I’m sure you know many more. As I said, some of these expressions can be both charming and confusing. George Bernard Shaw said, “England and America are two countries separated by a common language.” I would take it further, “America is a country separated by a common language.” Between our regional dialects, expressions, and slang, it is no small wonder that English is the hardest language to learn, particularly for our own people.

Originally published: February 5, 2010

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  BOM PROJECT ESTIMATING – If Bill of Materials is good enough for engineering and architecture, why not systems and programming?

LAST TIME:  AT THE BREAKING POINT  – Ramblings regarding the ideological divide in this country.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

SPECIAL: GOP STEREOTYPE SEASON

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 26, 2015

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- The season is officially open.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)

To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Now that Senator Ted Cruz has thrown his hat into the presidential ring, many others will likely follow suit shortly. This can only mean one thing; the GOP Stereotype season has officially opened. The main street media will now begin to characterize Republican contenders as either mean or crazy, or both. Let us not forget how they portrayed Senator Dan Quayle as a dim-bulb when he was announced as President George H.W. Bush’s running mate, even though it was Quayle who pushed for the development of the Patriot missile which was successfully used in the Middle East. Many people genuinely believe Governor Sarah Palin said she could “see Russia from her back yard,” when, in reality it was SNL comedienne Tina Fey who made the comment. In fact, Palin was actually an effective governor. And let us not forget how out of touch Governor Mitt Romney was portrayed with the working man and the poor. Somehow his successful run as Governor of Massachusetts and his work in the Utah Olympics was completely overlooked. Interestingly, the press somehow overlooked the time Democratic Senator Al Gore got lost in the woods shortly after being elected Vice President. Hardly anyone remembers the incident.

Recently I sat down with some friends to talk politics. When I asked them what they thought about Donald Trump, they shook their heads and said, “Oh, that hair,” in a Pavlovian Dog type of response.

“Beside the hair,” I asked, “What have you got against him?”

They balked.

“Is he a good business man?” I continued.

“No question,” they replied.

“Does he know economics and world politics?”

“Of course,” they replied.

“Then what have you got against this man?” I asked, “Surely it is not just his hair.”

No reply and they thought about it. The point had been made.

As we enter the Presidential Primary season, we must all be mindful of how the media will spin the character of the candidates, and it behooves all of us to take people to task when the candidates are fallaciously branded, regardless if they are our personal candidate or not. Let us reveal just who truly are the mean and crazy ones.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

AT THE BREAKING POINT

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 25, 2015

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- Ramblings regarding the ideological divide in this country.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Liberal friends simply do not understand my comments and resent it when I take a stand against their agenda. I am often accused of being insensitive or unreasonable. As an aside, have you ever noticed you are “unreasonable” when you do not agree with the other person’s position? It’s like saying, “Agree with me or I’ll call you a name.” Conversely, my conservative blood boils when I listen to the liberal diatribe. I look at them as if they have lost all sense of reality and common sense.

Keep in mind, I have many friends who are Liberals, and aside from this foible, I enjoy their company. I suspect they feel likewise with me. The truth is though, a line in the sand has been drawn and neither side wants to cooperate. My politics have cost me some friends, but I would rather cut them off than listen to their blather, and I suspect they feel likewise about me. It is like we are living in two interpretations of America. Consider the recent speech by Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu to a joint meeting of Congress; One speech, two entirely different interpretations. The point is, it is not that we just have gridlock in government but we also suffer with it in our society, putting us very much at edge as to what should be considered right and wrong.

We have gone from mere friendly jousting, to testy debates, to visceral attacks, followed by a break in relations. Courtesy and civility are quickly lost. For example, liberals will often try to bait me with antagonistic comments. I learned a long time ago not to lower myself to their level and simply delete their comments as opposed to responding to them. Face it, whatever I say will be rebuffed with insolence. The liberals go bananas when I delete their comments, but I remind them this is my column and they are welcome to write their own as opposed to poisoning mine.

Today, we are being asked to choose political sides in just about every institution we are involved in, be it companies or nonprofits. Consequently, we gravitate to those groups who share our interest and the chasm widens further. Frankly, we do not respect our opponents and the noise level rises with the passing of each day.

As conservative talk radio host Joy Tiz explains it, the way you fight the liberals is with facts. Yet, for every fact Conservatives produce, Liberals will have a conflicting one. Again, inconsistencies in the truth. Even when a hard fact is presented to the other side, they reject it. For example, when I point out the Gross Domestic Product is a paltry 2.2% (as reported by the U.S. Department of Commerce who monitors such figures), my opponents will argue this is simply not true, or attempts to misdirect the dialog to some other observation, e.g., “It’s Bush’s fault” or how “unreasonable” I am being.

It has been my observation conservative attacks are less visceral than liberals, but I’m sure the left would argue otherwise. Whereas liberals relish a comedic stab at conservatives, they cannot seem to accept it when the tables are turned. Even SNL producer Lorne Michaels admitted this recently. Whereas conservatives tend to take bitter satire with a grain of salt, the slightest malignment of liberals is treated like heresy.

This is not the first time I’ve discussed this subject, but the discourse seems to get more vicious with the passing of each year. It is similar to the relationship Fox News has with the main street media who would like nothing better than to see Fox obliterated. Yet, Fox continues to win the ratings wars. Maybe the reason Fox succeeds is because there are still more conservatives than liberals in this country, at least according to Gallup. Liberals are baffled by this which fuels their energies to “take down” anything remotely related to conservatism. They try to intellectualize their arguments and make the other party feel stupid, but the reality is, the other side is not buying it as it goes against common sense.

If you dare to criticize President Obama, the typical response is, “Where was all this venom when George Bush was in office? He did more to ruin the country than any president before or after him.” Somehow the left suffers from selective memory. I cannot think of a president more maligned by the left than George W. Bush, and this includes Richard Nixon.

In an interview years ago, John Wayne made the observation his generation of actors didn’t discuss politics when working on a picture. Everyone knew each other’s politics, which varied wildly, but to maintain harmony on the set, politics was considered a taboo subject. The studio brass also encouraged their stable of actors and actresses to remain quiet on politics outside of the studio as it would hurt them at the box office and their popularity with the public. This is no longer the case in Hollywood where people vent their opinions openly on camera or in front of the paparazzi. So much so, Hollywood is also split along ideological lines, with conservatives in the minority and losing work due to the liberals who control the studios and produce movies. Today, if you do not have the right politics, your career is threatened. Ask Dennis Miller, Janine Turner, Victoria Jackson, or Clint Eastwood whose “American Sniper” movie lost at the Oscars because it offended liberal sensibilities.

Perhaps the biggest difference between then and now is the media’s spin on the news today, and social media where we post any joke or news item that tickles our fancy. When it is spread over the Internet to the hundreds or thousands of “friends” we have, it inevitably triggers some form of response, be it for or against, and the battle lines draw tighter.

At a high school class reunion a couple of years ago, I was asked to give a eulogy for the classmates who passed away. Some people objected and worried I would turn it into a political platform. As someone who has led several Masonic funerals over the years, I take this matter rather seriously, and delivered the class eulogy with poise and aplomb (at least my classmates told me so). My message and delivery surprised those who were afraid I would turn it into a political donnybrook. They were simply mystified I could deliver such a speech.

The point is, the battle lines have been formed and I see it only getting worse. I believe, everything will somehow end up in court based on nothing more than our discourse (as if our courts have nothing better to do than interpret First Amendment rights).

The confrontation between left and right is getting so strong, it reminds me of the rifts developed during the American Civil War, pitting father against son, brother against brother, and neighbor against neighbor. So, the question becomes, has America become dysfunctional over politics? Maybe not yet, but we are getting dangerously close. Perhaps next year’s election results will tell the story. After suffering through eight years of government stagnation, if something doesn’t change, we may very well see a another episode of father against son, brother against brother, and neighbor against neighbor. I see no alternative. Do you?

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  YOU’RE FROM WHERE? – America is a country separated by a common language.

LAST TIME:  PROJECT MANAGEMENT INTEGRATION  – Success resides in taking an integrated approach, not piecemeal.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

PROJECT MANAGEMENT INTEGRATION

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 23, 2015

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

- Success resides in taking an integrated approach, not piecemeal.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

About ten years ago I wrote a paper titled, “Why Project Management Fails.” In it, I contended one of the reasons for failure was because of a “lack of consideration for the magnitude and complexities of project management and attack it in piecemeal.” Frankly, nothing has changed over the last ten years to lead me to believe this has changed.

There are five basic activities in Project Management: Planning, Estimating, Scheduling, Reporting, and Control. These activities work best when they are applied in an integrated manner, not separately. Let me illustrate:

* Project Planning involves such things as defining Work Breakdown Structures (WBS) and precedent relationships (methodology). This becomes the bedrock of all other project activities. However, planning also includes the application of human resources to project assignments. To do so, a Project Manager needs to consider what human resources are available, their skills and proficiencies (Skills Inventory), and their work schedules (Resource Allocation).

* Project estimating is an expression of the amount of time necessary to complete a project task. It is also used to calculate costs and project schedules. Ultimately, estimates represent personal commitments by workers to project assignments. Of course, we cannot calculate an estimate without the WBS as defined in project planning.

* Project scheduling is a projection of start and end dates of project tasks, and is calculated from worker estimates, their work schedule, and work environment (an effectiveness rate which considers interferences). This also requires the WBS and precedent relationships as defined in Project Planning.

* Project reporting – workers must routinely report their progress by reporting the amount of time spent on project assignments during a given period (usually weekly), along with the amount of time remaining on each task. Over runs and under runs against estimates cause a chain reaction in project schedules. Again, this requires the WBS and precedent relationships as defined in Project Planning. For example, if a project task is completed early, the ensuing tasks can start early. Conversely, if a project task is completed late, the ensuing tasks will be delayed. Project reporting also analyzes the amount of time expended, its cost, which is normally billed to a user area. Time reporting includes Direct Time (work on project assignments), Indirect Time (interferences), and Unavailable Time (e.g., vacations, holidays, time off). The reporting of Indirect Time and Unavailable Time is useful for calculating realistic schedules and managing the worker’s work environment. Capturing time in this manner has the added benefit of developing standards for estimates.

* Project control – without the other activities, project control is impossible. It studies estimates versus actuals, schedules versus actuals, the amount of time and costs expended versus time and costs remaining. Tolerance rates are used to detect when estimates and schedules have slipped to the point it is necessary to take corrective action (e.g., replace people) and recalculate estimates and schedules.

Each project activity is important in its own way, yet synergy results when all five activities work in concert using an integrated approach. When executed autonomously, inconsistencies and discrepancies ensue. For example…

- Developing a project plan that estimators and schedulers will ignore serves no purpose.

- Developing a project estimate that cannot be used to drive project schedules is a futile gesture.

- Developing a project schedule that fails to recognize Indirect and Unavailable Times (nor is tied to resource allocation) is useless.

- Reporting time without applying it to project estimates and schedules does not permit project control.

- Project control is impossible without a road map (methodology), estimate or schedule.

To succeed, it is necessary to remember Project Management is a philosophy of management, not an elaborate set of tools and techniques. I will not deny there are some fine software tools out there, but unless they can be seamlessly integrated into all of your project management activities, it will be counterproductive.

The lesson is simple: do not attack Project management in piecemeal, take a comprehensive approach. You will have a better chance for success and produce superior results.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  AT THE BREAKING POINT – Ramblings regarding the ideological divide in this country.

LAST TIME:  WORLD WAR III?  – Has it already started?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Management, Project Management | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

WORLD WAR III?

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 20, 2015

BRYCE ON WAR

- Has it already started?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Something the media and the White House dares not mention is the concept of World War III as it is considered political poison. For that matter, the president cannot even mention Islamic Terrorism, let alone the concept of a new world war, yet there are some compelling arguments the war has already begun and, as usual, the United States is going to have to play catch up.

As I mentioned last year in “Birth of a Nation,” the ISIS movement is gaining in strength. Whereas is was originally confined to Syria and Iraq, it has now spread to Algeria, Yemen, Libya, Indonesia and other places. There have also been terrorist attacks in France, Denmark, Canada, and the United States. Problems are brewing in Europe where Muslims have immigrated and are now politically skirmishing with the native citizens there. This is all reminiscent of Germany at the start of World War II where they “liberated” the Sudetenland, Austria, and Poland. As Naziism spread, it engulfed most of Europe and considerable portions of Northern Africa, the Middle East, and the Soviet Union. Today, ISIS is slowly gaining in stature and spreading throughout the Muslim world. The big prizes though will be Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Europe.

Hitler’s fanatical goon squads and SS troops were essentially no different than today’s ISIS terrorists. The major differences between them is three-fold; Whereas Naziism was a brand of political ideolog mixing socialism with dictatorship, ISIS is driven by the Islamic religion, complete with Sharia Law. Both were supremacists and claimed their approach would eliminate the social woes of the world.

Second, atrocities were the hallmark of both the Nazis and ISIS. The Nazi concentration camps were used to exterminate the “undesirables” of Europe. Likewise, ISIS is butchering everyone who doesn’t agree with their point of view, be it by decapitation, fire, or a bullet to the brain. There is no sense of humanity in any of this. It is also remarkable that antisemitic sentiments are rising once again, just as in Europe before the Nazis marched in.

The third difference between the two is leadership. Whereas Hitler became the demigod for the Third Reich, ISIS hasn’t yet found its true leader yet (thankfully). There is much talk about establishing an Islamic “caliphate” which is a form of government led by a “caliph,” the political and religious successor to the prophet Muhammad. While the ISIS goon squads remain active, they are awaiting their own demigod to unite them into battle. There are, of course, leaders in the ISIS movement, but nobody has come forward yet as “The Chosen One” or “Mahdi” (the “guided one”).

There is the possibility that Iran may become the uniting factor, a country with a stable government, resources, and potentially a nuclear arsenal. It is hard to imagine an Islamic caliphate armed in this manner. Their disregard for humanity would lead us to conclude they wouldn’t hesitate to use such weapons, starting with their favorite adversary, Israel. Fortunately, Israel is well armed, including their own nuclear arsenal and would doubtless fight back.

Instead of allowing the Middle East to fester and get worse, now is the time to nip this tinderbox in the bud, before another Hitler comes to power. Estimates of the size of the ISIS military ranges from as few as 20,000 people to 200,000. Their forces may be small and unsophisticated, but they are growing in size and capturing more land every day. To combat their threat, President Obama is primarily offering air power, but this does not seem to be an effective deterrent. After our involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan, the president is hesitant to send infantry forces. Instead, he is counting on Middle Eastern countries to put boots on the ground.

There is more than one million troops total in the Middle East. On paper, it sounds like an impressive number of troops to be deployed, but aside from Iraq, which has been ineffective thus far, the rest are not battle proven. What they need is someone like the United States, with its military prowess in terms of leadership and technology, to unite the forces, form a strategy, and direct operations. Yet, the president appears unwilling to make such a commitment. Here again we see another example of how the administration leads from behind, and our last analogy.

During the second world war, Britain was led by Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain who wanted to make peace with Hitler despite his acquisition of adjoining countries. Like Obama, Chamberlain knew the British people were tired of war and desperately tried to keep his country out of another one. Receiving a meaningless document from Hitler, Chamberlain naively claimed “Peace in our time,” which, of course, was not to be. This delayed Britain in rearming itself and cost them dearly in putting the country on a war footing. Fortunately, Chamberlain resigned which paved the way for Winston Churchill, someone more adept at fighting a war. Chamberlain’s naive actions and in-actions are frighteningly similar to those of the president.

Mr. Obama and the media may not like hearing it, but it appears we are entering a viscous third world war, whether we want it or not. From a military perspective, it would be smarter to conquer the problem now as opposed to allowing ISIS to grow in terms of members, resources, and captured territory. If they get the caliph they are looking for, their movement will only grow with resolve. Now is not the time to declare “Peace in our time,” but to notify the American people what is going on and what must be done to stop them. The public would be more supportive in such a campaign if they truly knew what was going on and the need to stop it now. If not, we’ll have to wait for another Churchill.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  PROJECT MANAGEMENT INTEGRATION – Success resides in taking an integrated approach, not piecemeal.

LAST TIME:  THE FRUSTRATION FACTOR  – How we become more impatient as we enter our sixties.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

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THE FRUSTRATION FACTOR

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 18, 2015

BRYCE ON LIFE

- How we become more impatient as we enter our sixties.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

My daughter came home for a visit recently. During the course of our conversations, she made the observation, “Dad, you’re not as patient as you used to be.” This caught me off guard, and in reflection, she was right. Whereas I was more tolerant years ago, now I am more black and white. At first, I dismissed the subject until I happened to consider the state of some of my friends locally who are also displaying the same characteristics, and we’re all in our early sixties…

I have a doctor friend who has been practicing internal medicine for a number of years. He has always been a kind and professional doctor who genuinely cares about the patients he treats. In the last few years though he has been overwhelmed by government bureaucracy which is preventing him from practicing medicine. New government regulations pertaining to the maintenance of patient records, Medicare/Medicaid, and now the Affordable Care Act is frustrating and causing him to dislike the profession he used to love, thereby making it a tremendous burden. It has gotten so bad, he is considering taking an early retirement, as are many other doctors like him who are fed up by obnoxious government regulations.

I have another friend who is a restauranteur and is also burning out due to government regulations. In addition, he has problems with personnel, particularly between cooks where a rift is brewing. Even though my friend has tried to iron out the differences, a change is likely in the offing forcing one of them to leave. This will cause my friend to hire yet another person and teach him the proper way of cooking according to his standards. Feeling harassed and frustrated, my friend constantly laments it is time to “pack it in.”

Another friend, a salesman, has been with his company for over thirty years. He has been the top salesman for many years and until recently sincerely enjoyed his job and company. His trademark for success was a professional attitude, customer service, and a line of top rated products at reasonable costs. However, the company began to change its corporate culture a couple of years ago and a line of new young managers were put into authority. Suddenly, things like professionalism and customer service were considered passe and replaced by a “bean counter” approach to management. He too is ready to move on to new pastures.

As for me, I have been a management consultant in the area of information systems for nearly forty years. I am proud of our company’s accomplishments, but the Information Technology field has changed. It is no longer a matter of doing what is right, but what is expedient. They also tend to think small, not big. As someone who is hired to tell people what is wrong with their business, and offer a solution, I grow weary watching people commit the same mistakes over and over again. I see this in both commercial enterprises as well as nonprofit organizations which are run by some well meaning people who haven’t a clue as to how to run a business. I am often asked why I keep beating my head against a wall.

More than anything, the frustration factor is caused by repetition. Think about it, over the course of our professional lives we have knocked on many doors, met and talked to hundreds of people, made a few thousand pots of coffee, traveled thousands of miles, wrote a ton of letters and e-mails, and always got up at the crack of dawn even when are bodies yearned for more sleep.

We have experienced great joys in our lifetimes, such as anniversaries, watching the birth of our children and how they grew into adulthood, with graduations and weddings along the way. We’ve been pleased to win a new contract, make a sale, or solve a problem that nobody else could. However, we’ve also experienced tragedies as well, such as a firing or demotion, losing a sale, accidents, and the death of family and friends. Due to repetition, holidays have lost their novelty and are viewed as burdens as opposed to joy.

Experience teaches us what works and what doesn’t. Our strong sense of history makes it frustrating to watch others commit the same mistakes you made. Consequently, we do not like what we see in business, in politics, and society in general. From this, we are all too willing to speak out, and offer our opinion, good or bad, and whether or not it was solicited.

Some would argue we resist change as we get older. I would argue, we readily accept changes that obviously help us, but resist what appears to be change for the sake of change. In business, many such changes are implemented based on naivete or ignorance of the past, and this is what my age group stubbornly resists. We also have trouble digesting unnecessarily complicated changes. For example, producing a system of medicine whereby the doctor spends more time completing patient records as opposed to practicing medicine, restaurants which are forced to reorganize kitchens over a minor health infraction, or using an order processing system that extends delivery as opposed to shortening it.

Over time, frustration builds up. Even though you bit your tongue for many years in order to maintain harmony, you can no longer help yourself in complaining about a situation, large or small. You feel entitled to complain based on your years of experience. There is only one problem though, you tend to turn people off and label yourself a dinosaur when you begin by saying something like, “Back in the day…”

Many of the changes we are getting are due to someone else’s complaint or registered grievance. Yet, when you complain, you are considered the problem in the way of change.

You also find you have to vent your frustrations, be it with a person or an inanimate object. The sad thing is, the inanimate object always wins the argument.

Such frustration is causing people of my age group to scream, “Enough is enough!”, which explains why a lot of people are ready to pack it in. However, in our eyes, we see ourselves as the child who exclaims, “The emperor has no clothes!” We deliver advice in the hopes people will not commit a mistake, or to point out techniques and tools that have been proven effective, and are frustrated when it falls on deaf ears. Our choice is simple, register a bitch or back off which is something we dislike immensely.

Yet, I suspect this phenomenon is not unique, that it has been going on since time immemorial. Being in our early sixties, we still have a dance or two left in us. It is not that we are physically tired, all my friends are still capable of performing their jobs. Instead, we grow mentally exhausted watching the world commit the same mistakes. Maybe this is nothing more than the passing of the torch.

So, yes, my peers are tired of the BS and are willing to tell people so. This leads me back to my daughter’s original observation; Yes, I am not as patient as I used to be, and for good reason!

“When I was a boy of 14, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be 21, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years.” – Mark Twain

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  WORLD WAR III? – Has it already started?

LAST TIME:  REPUBLICAN IDEOLOGY  – Expressing the GOP agenda through the quotes of the presidential hopefuls.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »

IS OUR FLAG STILL THERE?

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 17, 2015

BRYCE ON THE AMERICAN FLAG

- Old Glory under attack.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

There have been several incidents recently which would lead us to believe the American flag is under attack.

At UC, Irvine, the Student Government voted to eliminate all flags, including the Stars and Stripes, from outside of their building. This was done to make the offices more “culturally inclusive” for all students. Following this, 60 professors signed a letter supporting the flag ban claiming “US nationalism often contributes to racism and xenophobia.” The decision to ban the flags was later overturned.

Last week, a group of judges told the Portsmouth County, VA, Sheriff to remove an American flag display from the court house. The flag was a special gift from the Portsmouth Fire Department.

A Texas school painted over an American flag-like mural on a school under construction in a new development. The reason? Red, white and blue were not approved colors in the subdivision where the school is being built.

In the recent photo showing President Obama leading the 50th anniversary march of Selma, not one American flag could be seen in the photo. This is in sharp contrast to the photos of the original 1965 march where the flag was highly visible.

Just this past weekend, protesters in Ferguson, MO, ripped an American flag in two and others stomped on it. In Virginia Beach, an American Flag was stolen from a restaurant, as well as from a community in Morgan Hill, CA.

Old Glory hasn’t taken such a beating since 1968 when Yippies protested the Viet Nam War and the Democratic Convention in Chicago. Interestingly, the flag comes under attack in times of cultural crisis. Just as in 1968, the American people are very much divided along ideological lines with one side wanting to radically change the underpinnings of America, while another wishes to maintain the moral values from which the country was founded upon. One side wants to proudly wave the flag, the other is bent on desecrating it.

The question is why? The flag is a symbol of our country, not representative of a hate speech or sign of inequality, discrimination, or political correctness. It was originally designed to represent the unity of the states, and honor the original thirteen colonies.

However, some people now want us to be ashamed of our country through our flag. It is true that America is certainly not perfect, but then again what country is? Have we made mistakes? Certainly. Will we continue to do so? Undoubtedly. But we also have many more things to be proud of as a country, such as our freedoms and liberty, a land of opportunity and the free enterprise system. Soldiers and sailors have followed it into battle numerous times to defend this way of life. And finally, it is also a beacon of hope to the outside world.

No, we should not be ashamed of the American flag. We may be critical of some of our politicians and institutions, something we have only ourselves to blame for not taking them to task or voting. Instead, the flag is something we should take pride in, so that we may continue to disagree as well as work together, in good times as well as bad.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

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REPUBLICAN IDEOLOGY

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 16, 2015

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- Expressing the GOP agenda through the quotes of the presidential hopefuls.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Although the media tends to portray Republicans as old men in their dotage who are out of touch with the world today, you can actually learn a lot about the GOP agenda by simply listening to the speeches they make. Lincoln was the first and perhaps the most eloquent of Republican Presidents who represented his party admirably, but there have been many others. My personal favorite was Calvin Coolidge who made several insightful quotes; among them:

“Collecting more taxes than is absolutely necessary is legalized robbery.”

“To live under the American Constitution is the greatest political privilege that was ever accorded to the human race.”

“Perhaps one of the most important accomplishments of my administration has been minding my own business.”

“The business of America is business.”

Such quotes provide insight into what Republicans believe. To find out what today’s Republicans are thinking you need look no further than those who are considering a run for the presidency in 2016. Here, I have assembled a list of quotations from the likely candidates. The emphasis here is not their differences but rather their similarities; that which makes them Republican. From these quotations you get a sense of what Republicans believe. As you read through the list you will inevitably note some repetition in their words. Such similarities ultimately dictate the Republican ideology of today.

Gov. Jeb Bush (FL)

“Well, I think lower taxes and less regulation would actually promote growth.”

Gov. Chris Christie (NJ)

“Higher taxes is the road to ruin. We must and we will shrink our government, and that means making some tough choices, tightening our belts.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham (SC)

“If you increase taxes now on – at any level, it’s going to make it harder to create jobs. And we’ve lost 2 1/2 million jobs since the stimulus package passed. We’re at 9.6 unemployment. So I don’t think we tax too little, I think we spend too much.”

Gov. Mike Huckabee (AR)

“I think a lot of people in America do not understand that the basis of true liberty can’t happen without an objective moral standard by which we live our lives.”

“The fact is, my friends, most Americans don’t want more government. They want less government.”

“I wish we would all remember that being American is not just about the freedom we have; it is about those who gave it to us.”

Gov. Sarah Palin (AK)

“Folks, this government isn’t too big to fail, it’s too big to succeed.”

Gov. George Pataki (NY)

“When government accepts responsibility for people, then people no longer take responsibility for themselves.”

“This Budget reflects a choice – not an easy choice, but the right choice. And when you think about it, the only choice. The choice to take the responsible, prudent path to fiscal stability, economic growth and opportunity.”

Gov. Rick Perry (TX)

“Our citizens are tired of big government raising their taxes and cooking up new ways to micromanage their lives, our citizens are tired of big government killing jobs with their do-gooder policies. In short the people are Fed Up!”

“As Americans, we don’t see the role of government as guaranteeing outcomes, but allowing free men and women to flourish based on their own vision, their hard work and their personal responsibility.”

“Americans want government that is leaner, more efficient, and less intrusive into their personal lives.”

Gov. Scott Walker (WI)

“What has made America amazing has been the fact that throughout our history, throughout the more than 200 years of our history, there have been men and women of courage who stood up and decided it was more important to look out for the future of their children and their grandchildren than their own political futures.”

“People create jobs, not the government.”

“I believe that smaller government is better government. But I also believe that in the areas where government does play a legitimate role, we should demand that it is done better.”

“One of those promises was to limit the size of government and to have the government serve the people – and not the other way around.”

Sen. Ted Cruz (TX)

“The American free market system is the greatest engine for prosperity and opportunity that the world has ever seen. Freedom works.”

“Government is not the answer (for turning around the country). You are not doing anyone a favor by creating dependency, destroying individual responsibility.”

“We are seeing a great awakening. A national movement of We the People, brought together by what unites us – a shared love of liberty, and an understanding of the unlimited potential of free men and free women.”

Sen. Rand Paul (KY)

“The great and abiding lesson of American history, particularly the cold war, is that the engine of capitalism, the individual, is mightier than any collective.”

“We must always embrace individual liberty and enforce the constitutional rights of all Americans-rich and poor, immigrant and native, black and white.”

“If our freedom is taken, the American dream will wither and die.”

“We don’t need bigger government. We need to shrink the size of government.”

Sen. Marco Rubio (FL)

“Our national motto is ‘In God we Trust,’ reminding us that faith in our Creator is the most important American value of all.”

“This is the only country in the world where today’s employee, is tomorrow’s employer.”

“Americans chose a limited government that exists to protect our rights, not to grant them.”

“Every nation on the Earth that embraces market economics and the free enterprise system is pulling millions of its people out of poverty. The free enterprise system creates prosperity, not denies it.”

Sen. Rick Santorum (PA)

“You can’t have a limited government if the family breaks down.”

“The more moral the people are in their business dealings, the less paperwork you need, the more handshakes you can have, the more the wheels of capitalism work better because there’s trust in the marketplace. Business ethics is not a joke. And, in fact, I think most businesses that I’ve dealt with encourage exactly that type of behavior.”

“I believe in capitalism for everybody, not necessarily high finance but capitalism that works for the working men and women of this country who are out there paddling alone in America right now.”

Rep. Peter King (NY)

“Every soldier, every cop who’s faced with a decision to make, a life or death, does the best he or she can.”

“I mean, I really don’t want the federal government to be determining whether or not a person who feels certain ways about the environment or about animals or about certain religious issues should be considered an extremist. That to me is a type of thought control, mind control, which is very dangerous.”

Ben Carson (MD)

“Through hard work, perseverance and a faith in God, you can live your dreams.”

“The Roman Empire was very, very much like us. They lost their moral core, their sense of values in terms of who they were. And after all of those things converged together, they just went right down the tubes very quickly.”

“We’re not planning for the future. If we continue to spend ourselves into oblivion, we are going to destroy this nation.”

Carly Fiorina (CA)

“The truth is in California you can’t build a new manufacturing facility, and businesses are leaving in droves because of bad government policy.”

“You take unacceptable risk, you have to be prepared to face the consequence.”

Donald Trump (NY)

“Getting things done in this country, if you want to build something, if you want to start a company, it’s getting to be virtually impossible with all of the bureaucracy and all of the approvals.”

“I have made the tough decisions, always with an eye toward the bottom line. Perhaps it’s time America was run like a business.”

What do these candidates tell us about the Republican ideology? They believe…

* In Deity, moral values, and the family unit.

* In a smaller, less intrusive government.

* In the value of the free enterprise system (capitalism).

* In a person assuming responsibility for their actions and not becoming enslaved as wards of the state.

* In providing a person with the freedom to pursue their dreams, take risks, and encourage innovation.

* In emboldening business through less regulation.

* In the U.S. Constitution,

Come to think of it, this is not dissimilar to what Republicans have believed for many years and is essentially no different than the Coolidge quotes expressed at the beginning. No, there are no secrets in the Republican agenda, just misinformation from the media.

BTW, Many thanks to Brainy Quote.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  THE FRUSTRATION FACTOR – How we become more impatient as we enter our sixties.

LAST TIME:  ADAPTING TO THE CORPORATE CULTURE  – There are both logical and physical aspects to be considered.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

ADAPTING TO THE CORPORATE CULTURE

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 13, 2015

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

- There are both logical and physical aspects to be considered.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I recently had a reader ask me what he should do about an office environment where the workers have incompatible Personality Types; e.g., Types A, B, C, and D. His concern was that some people didn’t like to be told what to do and others stubbornly didn’t want to work with others. First, it is difficult, if not impossible, to find a homogeneous environment whereby everyone is rowing on the same oar in a concerted manner, particularly in this day and age of self-absorption. Managers should certainly understand the different personality types, but shouldn’t let this be a deterrent for creating a harmonious working environment. More importantly, the manager needs to understand and take charge of the corporate culture.

As I have written, there are logical and physical dimensions to corporate culture. The physical includes such things as office layout, temperature, ergonomics, and basically anything affecting the human senses of sight, sound, touch, smell, etc. Managers should understand people will adapt to their physical environment. If it is sloppy, they will do likewise. If it is clean, it will remain clean (as long as the manager instills the necessary discipline).

The logical side of corporate culture refers to personal behavior and includes such things as ethics, speech, common courtesy, protocol, etc. Here, some role models are needed as well as a code of conduct or policy manual. Employees shouldn’t have to guess what the proper form of conduct is. Instead, it should be spelled out for them along with some visible examples (such as the boss). If the manager wants teamwork, he’ll make them believe they are team players and coach them accordingly. However, if the boss wants rugged individualism, he’ll allow petty politics to flourish.

I am amazed when I meet managers who do not grasp the significance of the corporate culture and allow others to dictate its behavior, such as their subordinates. One key element separating success from failure for a manager is his or her ability to control the corporate culture. If they allow others to dictate the culture, the manager will always be dancing to someone else’s tune, as opposed to the other way around. Imagine a baseball team run by the players as opposed to the coach. Players would fight over the positions to play, game strategy, what plays to call, even what to wear for a uniform, and in all likelihood you would never again see a “sacrifice bunt.” No, we need managers to instill the necessary discipline, assign duties and responsibilities, and instill a sense of teamwork towards a common goal. In my book, that is called controlling the corporate culture.

Yes, managers need to understand the talents and personalities of their workers in order to utilize them to their maximum potential, but they must first create the proper working environment for the staff to adapt to, not the manager.

For more information on this subject, see my article titled, “Understanding Corporate Culture.”

Originally published: February 1, 2010

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  REPUBLICAN IDEOLOGY – Expressing the GOP agenda through the quotes of the presidential hopefuls. 

LAST TIME:  THE DICHOTOMY OF POLITICAL CORRECTNESS  – If we cannot publicly discuss certain subjects, it seems perfectly reasonable the media shouldn’t either.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Business, Management | 4 Comments »

 
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