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REMEMBERING THE DOOLITTLE RAID

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 18, 2014

BRYCE ON HISTORY

- 72 years ago, American flyers dropped bombs on Japan as retribution for Pearl Harbor.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)

To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

April 18th represents the anniversary of many key events in history; in 1906 it marked the destructive San Francisco earthquake and fire, Yankee Stadium opened in 1923 (“The House that Ruth Built”), in 1943 Japanese Admiral Yamamoto was shot down by American flyers over Bougainville, and in 1983 a suicide bomber destroyed the American embassy in Beirut, killing 63 people. To me though, April 18th primarily means one thing, the 1942 Doolittle Raid on Japan.

72 years ago today, Lieutenant Colonel James “Jimmy” Doolittle of the U.S. Army Air Forces (USAAF, the precursor to the U.S. Air Force), led an attack on industrial targets in Japan as retribution for the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, just over four months earlier. Considering the state of our military at the time, it is amazing America was able to pull together this response in such a short period of time. Make no mistake though, this was done more for rallying the spirit of America as opposed to making a strategic knockout punch.

My fascination with the raid began as a young man, when I purchased the book, “Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo,” by Captain Ted W. Lawson (1943). This is the first book I purchased at my grammar school book fair. Like a lot of youths of the period, the early 1960′s, I wrote a book report on it. In 1944, the book was followed by a movie of the same name, starring Spencer Tracy and Van Johnson.

From the book, I developed a fascination with the B-25 “Mitchell” representing the sixteen aircraft used in the raid. It remains my favorite medium bomber from that era. Interestingly, it was named after General Billy Mitchell, a hero of mine who was an early pioneer of “air power.” As an aside, it was Mitchell who predicted the attack on Hawaii a full 17 years before it happened. Mitchell also foresaw the need for medium and heavy bombers.

I will not try to explain the story of the raid herein as it has already been well told in both print and film. Suffice it to say it was an imaginative and courageous effort to strike back at the Japanese war machine. The raiders were escorted to Japan aboard the USS Hornet, which they launched from when they got within range of Japan, a daring feat as bombers had never before flown off an aircraft carrier. The raiders carried out their bombing run on various targets in and around Tokyo, before making their escape to China (one group made it to the USSR where they were imprisoned for a year). Two groups were captured by the Japanese, with three men being tried for military crimes and executed, the others were imprisoned in a Japanese POW camp for over three years. A few perished as they tried to land in China, but most made their escape thanks to the Chinese. Because of this, the Japanese killed approximately 250,000 Chinese for assisting the Americans.

Of the 80 men participating in the raid, only four survive to date, one of which is approaching 99 years of age (Richard “Dick” Cole). Over the years, the raiders held many reunions. Following the war, the citizens of Tucson, Arizona made a presentation of 80 sterling goblets to the group so the raiders could toast each other, both living and passed. A bottle of cognac accompanies the goblets for the last two remaining raiders to open and enjoy. The raiders no longer hold reunions as they have become old and frail, and the goblets are now maintained at the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs.

As an aside, there is now an effort underway to award the Congressional Gold Medal to the raiders before the last few pass away. For information, see “The Doolittle Tokyo Raiders.” The group needs your support.

Following Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt was looking for a way to lift the morale of the American people. He also wanted to send a message to the Japanese people that they were not as invulnerable as their government would have them believe. Navy Captain Francis Low, the Assistant Chief of Staff for anti-submarine warfare, was credited with the idea for launching bombers off of aircraft carriers. The plan was developed and implemented by Colonel Doolittle, a well known and respected aviator prior to the war.

The mission was bold, imaginative, inspirational, and achieved its goals. The raid caused nominal material destruction on Japan, nothing like the extensive daylight and evening bombings of Europe. However, it achieved the psychological objectives Roosevelt was hoping for, such as lifting the spirits of Americans while planting the seeds of doubt in the Japanese.

I write about the Doolittle Raid for two reasons: as a history lesson for our youth, and to remind us that we could use such ingenuity and courage today.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  HOW DO WE BUILD GREAT MANAGERS? – Companies are “penny wise, pound foolish” in training managers.

LAST TIME:  CONSERVATIVE STEREOTYPES  – Some sleight of hand to vilify conservatives.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in History | Tagged: , , , , | 8 Comments »

CONSERVATIVE STEREOTYPES

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 16, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- Some sleight of hand to vilify conservatives.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Following the release of one of my more politically inclined columns, I was accused by a reader of being an ultra conservative. The reader based his comments on established stereotypes of conservatives which I personally find distasteful. Such images have become rather old and tiresome, but were still effective in the last presidential election. These stereotypes were concocted by the Media over time and inevitably raise their ugly heads during election time. What concerns me though is these images are simply fallacious and aimed at misleading people away from the true issues at hand. Let me give you some prime examples of conservative stereotypes:

CONSERVATIVES ARE PRO-BUSINESS, EVEN AT THE EXPENSE OF SQUASHING ANYTHING THAT GETS IN THEIR WAY, INCLUDING THE LITTLE GUY.
I think it is no secret that conservatives believe in the free enterprise system, the land of opportunity, and an honest day’s wage for an honest day’s work, but I do not believe they are as ruthless as they are portrayed. They are unapologetic capitalists who want less government control, not more. Conservatives tend to see government as the servant of the people, not the other way around. This drives people crazy who oppose this way of thinking, particularly socialists and communists. It’s no small wonder that capitalists are portrayed as “fat-cats” who profit off the worker.

The reality is you will find just as many liberals in the board room as you will find conservatives. Further, anyone who has faced the realities and risks of starting up his/her own company, particularly a small business, is somewhat inclined to appreciate capitalist principles.

CONSERVATIVES DO NOT SHARE AND WANT TO CREATE A MASTER/SLAVE CLASS SOCIETY.
This is just plain bunk. First, greed knows no political ideologue. Second, we’re back to the capitalist argument whereby conservatives appreciate hard work and reward accordingly. Look, it’s simple, you cannot do everything yourself; you have to delegate, empower, and support your people, which includes compensating them accordingly. It’s just plain smart business. Third, conservatives give generously of themselves for a wide variety of causes. Although they balk at turning their wallets completely over to the government, conservatives gladly lend a helping hand to those who truly need it. Liberals certainly do not hold a monopoly on charitable causes.

CONSERVATIVES ARE ANTI-ENVIRONMENT.
It is generally believed that if you are a conservative, you have a fundamental disregard for the planet; that you want to rape the Earth and eradicate its resources. My question is, “Why?” This would imply that conservatives are like some visitors from outer space here to plunder the earth’s resources and leave a dead shell. I’m afraid I haven’t seen the conservative flying saucer yet, and I think we are all stuck on this planet together. In fact, conservatives have found such things as conservation, recycling, and land reclamation are not just good ideas, it’s smart business.

CONSERVATIVES ARE ULTRA RELIGIOUS.
Show me a fanatical Bible thumper and I’ll show you a conservative; Right? Wrong. I can’t begin to tell you how many liberals I have met through organized religion. We often hear of the “Religious Right” which primarily consists of Christian groups, but I don’t recall where it is written that a belief in Jesus Christ is a prerequisite for becoming a conservative. In fact, I’ve met conservatives from just about every religious faith imaginable. I will grant that conservatives tend to derive their core values from their religious beliefs, whatever they may be, but they are certainly not religious fanatics.

There is an interesting dichotomy here: whereas conservatives are accused of unethical behavior in business and the environment, they are also portrayed as religious zealots. I guess the assumption here is that organized religion doesn’t promote ethical behavior.

CONSERVATIVES ARE UNEDUCATED, UNIMAGINATIVE, AND ONLY FOLLOW PARTY LINES.
There is a general belief conservatives are incapable of intelligent discourse, are crude and lack creativity, and thereby must be told what to do. Gee, it kind of sounds like the goons in the Nazi Party under Adolph Hitler doesn’t it?

The notion conservatives are old-fashioned fuddy-duddies who resist change is erroneous. I know a lot of liberals who have been unbending in their ideas since the 1960′s.

Since conservatives tend to have a business perspective they are somewhat inclined to be freethinkers, meaning if it makes sense to them, they’ll buy it, regardless of who sells it. They will also make it plain if they do not agree with you, and perhaps this is what bothers their opposition. In fact, I find conservatives to be more open to debate; for example, consider the popularity of conservative talk radio programs (you don’t see too many liberal programs do you?)

CONSERVATIVES DO NOT HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR.
For a long time, conservatives have had to endure all kinds of jokes as communicated through political bumper stickers, cartoons, and late night comedians. In the process I think they have developed some rather thick skin and do, in fact, appreciate a good joke, although I admit their humor is not as destructive as others. But what is good for the goose should be good for the gander. Try poking fun at a liberal and you are accused of blasphemy. Now that’s funny.

CONSERVATIVES ARE RACISTS.
I’m not even going to dignify this with a rebuttal. Pure bunk.

CONSERVATIVES ARE ANTI-WOMEN
(See “Conservatives are racists”).

CONCLUSION

The concept of conservative stereotypes is nothing more than brainwashing for the purpose of social engineering by the media. Young people are taught early on that being a conservative is not “cool”…

“Did you know he is a conservative?”

“Really? He’s one of them? Wow! That’s lame.”

Behind the facade of the conservative stereotypes is a deeply-rooted resentment to capitalism, which the conservatives embrace. Anti-capitalists want to replace the system and evenly spread the wealth regardless of how much effort a person exerts to earn it. To conservatives, capitalism is the stimulus that encourages people to become entrepreneurs; to move forward and take risks, to boldly go where no one has gone before, to evolve, and hopefully succeed.

Like I said earlier, I have been accused of being an “ultra” conservative. As an aside, a friend recently pointed out to me, how come we do not apply this adjective to liberals (an “ultra” liberal)? I guess it is another attempt to stereotype conservatives as extremists (and liberals are not?).

It has been my experience that conservatives take their fiduciary responsibilities seriously, they are not afraid to be held accountable for their actions, they want to lead a worthy and meaningful life, and possess an ethical makeup derived from their religious beliefs. If this is what an “ultra” conservative is, then I plead, “Guilty. Most guilty.”

“Show me a young Conservative and I’ll show you someone with no heart.
Show me an old Liberal and I’ll show you someone with no brains.”

- Winston Churchill

Originally published: 3/2/2009

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  REMEMBERING THE DOOLITTLE RAID – 72 years ago, American flyers dropped bombs on Japan as retribution for Pearl Harbor.

LAST TIME:  STREAMING TV: THE NEXT GENERATION  – Like it or not, Streaming TV is here to stay.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

STREAMING TV: THE NEXT GENERATION

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 14, 2014

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

- Like it or not, Streaming TV is here to stay.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Prior to the advent of cable-TV, we were all at the mercy of the programming of the Big 3 networks, ABC, CBS, and NBC. The viewer quickly became familiar with their scheduling. It was simple and you knew when everything was on. For example, Friday nights were boxing and wrestling, Saturday nights were movies, Sunday nights were Ed Sullivan, Bonanza, and Disney, etc. It was rather easy to figure out. Cable-TV came along in the 1970′s and added several channels, such as HBO, Cinemax, Showtime, The Movie Channel, etc. These channels quickly reproduced and multiplied into dozens of additional channels. Many other networks were introduced and propagated accordingly. So much so, the simple “TV Guide” was essentially replaced by monstrous programming schedules shown on the screen. At the same time, we went through a plethora of video players, such as Beta, VHS, DVD’s, and Blu-ray, providing us with additional content for us to chose from.

Streaming technology is the latest twist and it’s arrival inevitable. People want instant access to their favorite shows and movies, so they can watch them any time and any place, without having to purchase the latest media hardware. Now we are being inundated with choices and frankly, a lot of people are intimidated by the technology, particularly older people who are not imbued with smart phones and the Internet. Actually, the technology is not as imposing as it may seem. It just requires a little patience to learn it.

I got involved with the Roku Streaming Player not long ago. It requires Wi-Fi support, and an HDMI port, which is now standard on High Definition Televisions (HDTV). A remote control is included to navigate the many channels available, such as Netflix, Amazon, Hulu Plus, HBO GO, Pandora, Acorn (for lovers of British TV), and many others. Each has considerable content for you to wade through.

I also tried Google’s ChromeCast which also requires an HDMI port and Wi-Fi support. Unlike Roku, it requires computer input as opposed to a remote control unit. ChromeCast also includes such channels as Netflix, YouTube, HBO GO, Hulu Plus, Pandora, etc. From my observation, it doesn’t have as much content as Roku yet, but is has more than enough to entertain you and keep you busy.

Other streaming players are doubtless in the offing. All that seems to be needed is an HDMI port, Wi-Fi support, and access to the various networks which, I must point out, requires subscriptions for a fee.

These devices bring to the table a huge repository of programming, be it movies, television, sporting events (both past and present), and you can watch it at your convenience, not a set time. You can either select from different categories, such as Drama, Comedy, Action, etc. or search for a particular title yourself. For classic movie or television buffs, be forewarned, I had trouble finding anything of substance from the 1960′s or earlier.

Now, with such streaming devices, there are so many choices, it takes a long time to find something to watch. Many shows are either of no interest to me due to a variety of reasons, or I’ve seen them before. The search for a suitable program can become laborious and frustrating, particularly when you keep striking out with the search routines provided by the networks, and herein is the Achilles’ Heal of these services. The content is so massive, you will inevitably find yourself wasting considerable time trying to find something to watch. If you happen to know the title of the program, great. If not, forget it. It would be nice if the search engines would allow you to search by keyword, actor, director, studio, or year made. Better yet, establish “Junk” parameters for browsing the various categories. For example, I am not a fan of actor Adam Sandler, therefore I wish I could block the listing of his films, thereby expediting my browsing. Perhaps I want to search by a specific year or range of years, which would certainly speed things up. This has more to do with the networks as opposed to devices like Roku and ChromeCast. Whatever network finds a better way of searching or browsing through their content, will likely dominate the field.

Streaming TV is here to stay. Forget about your tape decks and DVD players; they have gone the way of “rabbit ears,” UHF antennas, and television sign-offs at 1:00pm. You will have to pay a little more for your television pleasure, and it will seem a lot more complicated, but this is the future of television, like it not. For those of you who can remember the early days of television, you will undoubtedly miss the simplicity of three network programming, and how inexpensive television used to be (free). Such is the price of progress.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  CONSERVATIVE STEREOTYPES – Some sleight of hand to vilify conservatives.

LAST TIME:  RENTAL PROPERTIES  – It’s like a boat; the best two days are when you buy one, and when you sell it.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Technology | Tagged: , , , , , | 7 Comments »

RENTAL PROPERTIES

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 11, 2014

BRYCE ON INVESTMENTS

- It’s like a boat; the best two days are when you buy one, and when you sell it.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

In these troubled economic times we’re always looking for a way to make a little extra cash. To this end, many people like to purchase buildings, condos or apartments and then rent them out. This type of investment is appealing for several reasons:

* It represents an asset you can possibly sell at a future date, hopefully for a profit.
* It’s also a handy tax write-off, particularly the interest on a mortgage.
* And it is a seemingly steady cash flow that can hopefully pay off the investment over time.

From a purely economic viewpoint, renting sounds like a great idea that can possibly give you a better return on investment than what a lot of the financial institutions are offering. If we lived in a perfect world, everything would be rosy and you would have a cash machine chugging away night and day, but unfortunately such is not the case. In reality, there are a lot of headaches associated with rental property. The first thing you have to realize is that the rental property does not run itself. You need people to market it, maintain it, and to live in it. This translates into real estate agents, homeowner associations, maintenance vendors, and renters. In other words, your troubles are only beginning.

Homeowner or condo associations typically watch your every move and are eager to cite you for the slightest violation of the rules. They are also not bashful when it comes to presenting you with bills for dues or some other innocuous improvement to the common areas of the property (which, of course, you were never consulted on).

Building repairs is an ongoing problem as something will inevitably go wrong at the worst possible time, such as when you are miles away on vacation somewhere. Air conditioners, refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers, etc. all have an uncanny knack for breaking down, even if you have a maintenance contract with someone. Then there is the problem of repairing the roof or parking lot every few years, representing a tidy outlay of money.

But perhaps the biggest problem is the renter, the tenant who leases the property. Typically, the relationship between landlord and tenant is either very good or very bad, rarely is it in-between. The person who pays his/her rent on time, is not a deadbeat, and takes reasonable care of the property is becoming few and far between. Most assume no responsibility for the property, live like slobs, and expect the landlord to be on-call 24/7 even for a problem the tenant created. True, there are also slum lords who neglect their responsibilities, but renters can be equally irresponsible as well. Then there is the problem of evicting a deadbeat tenant which involves a long and nasty legal process. Hopefully, the tenant will not seriously damage the property or remove appliances during the eviction process.

With all of this in mind, I am seeing more and more people shy away from investing in rental properties. In a way, I guess a rental property is a lot like a boat whereby the best two days are when you buy it and when you sell it. When you compare the headaches associated with being a landlord to other types of investments, maybe that low interest Certificate of Deposit doesn’t look too bad after all.

Originally Published: 04/17/2009

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  STREAMING TV: THE NEXT GENERATION – Like it or not, Streaming TV is here to stay.

LAST TIME:  HOW LIBERALS AND CONSERVATIVES PERCEIVE THE PEOPLE  – Our perceptions dictate not only how we will manage workers, but how we want to govern the people.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

HOW LIBERALS AND CONSERVATIVES PERCEIVE THE PEOPLE

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 9, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- Our perceptions dictate not only how we will manage workers, but how we want to govern the people.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I have described the differences between liberals and conservatives on more than one occasion. More recently, I examined their personalities, but herein I want to discuss their perspectives of the American people.

In the business world, one of the elements used to determine our style of management is how we perceive our workers, such as their strengths and weaknesses, their ability to assume responsibility, and their intelligence level. If managers perceive workers as lazy and unintelligent, they will likely chose a “Theory X” form of management, representing autocratic rule and considerable micromanagement. The byproduct of this “top-down” form of management promotes a slave mentality in workers. However, if they perceive workers as intelligent and responsible, they are more likely to implement a “Theory Y or Z” management philosophy, e.g., empower the workers, and turn them loose with minimal supervision. This “bottom-up” approach provides more freedom for workers, and encourages teamwork and personal initiative. This distinction is true in the political world as well.

Liberals tend to look upon the people as unintelligent and lazy, requiring someone to chaperone and think for them. In this way, they want to govern in the manner of a parent to its children, e.g., the parent knows what is best, the parent makes all the decisions, the parent watches the child’s every move, the parent dictates how the child must think. This is “Theory X” behavior in its robust form.

There is an element of truth that certain people behave like cattle and need to be herded accordingly. These are people who shirk responsibility and are content to be nothing more than wards of the state. The vast majority of the American people are intelligent, assume responsibility for their actions and want to think for themselves. These are people who embrace the concept of capitalism as opposed to socialism.

Conservatives believe in the rights of the individual, that each person must accept a certain amount of risk in their lives whereby they might succeed or fail. All they want is a chance, and not be encumbered by too much management or bureaucracy. This again is analogous to “Theory Y or Z” whereby the people are empowered and turned loose with minimal supervision.

It all comes down to simple human perspective. From it, our political ideology is formed just as our style of management is formed from observing our workers. Those who comfortably behave like sheep will gladly accept the liberal agenda, while responsible workers who are freethinking will accept the conservative agenda.

So, should people be able to roam on their own, or do they have to be herded? Your answer will dictate your political ideology.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  RENTAL PROPERTIES – It’s like a boat; the best two days are when you buy one, and when you sell it.

LAST TIME:  BUILDING TEAM MORALE THROUGH LEADERSHIP  – How a classic World War II movie teaches the basic lessons of leadership.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 9 Comments »

BUILDING TEAM MORALE THROUGH LEADERSHIP

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 7, 2014

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

- How a classic World War II movie teaches the basic lessons of leadership.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

In the movie, “Twelve O’Clock High,” actor Gregory Peck plays the role of a World War II Brigadier General charged with taking command of an American B-17 bombing group stationed in Britain, and suffering from a bad case of “hard luck.” To make matters worse, the men of the group hold a fondness for Peck’s predecessor, yet were prone to making mistakes and missing targets. As a result, the group experiences heavy losses and morale worsens. As Peck takes command he makes it clear to his group he doesn’t accept the concept of “hard luck,” that the men should stop feeling sorry for themselves, and they need to build their confidence.

Remarkably, this movie represents a text book description of leadership. So much so, for many years it was considered mandatory viewing in the Officer Candidate Schools in the military as part of their curriculum on leadership. It is also something managers should observe in business, even today.

Due to the nature of the war at that moment (1942), Peck has no time to coddle his young flyers and realizes they have to mature quickly. If his bombing group folds, others could potentially do likewise which could impact the outcome of the war. So, he explains this to the group and why it is necessary for them to take on a professional attitude. Recognizing the discipline and work involved, the young soldiers resist Peck at first, but eventually succumbs after realizing Peck’s refusal to compromise.

Peck finds it necessary to replace elements of his management team, specifically his #2 man, the Air Exec. Interestingly, Peck selects a man who, at first, shows contempt for Peck, but recognizing the flyer’s impeccable credentials, he promotes him, a decision he doesn’t regret as he realizes the job was more important than his personal feelings.

Next, Peck halts all bombing runs so he can hold practice missions to determine the skills of his crews, and identify their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, Peck weeds out the weaklings of the group and puts them in a separate dead-beat team labeled the “Leper Colony,” where they are forced to turn things around.

From the outset, in order to change the psychological dynamics of the group, Peck recognizes he must instill a sense of pride and confidence in his men; that they are not “hard luck” misfits, but professional soldiers who can get the job done with an esprit de corps.

Aside from being an interesting tale about World War II, “Twelve O’Clock High” is a worthwhile management read teaching several lessons:

1. A manager should try to earn the respect of his workers, not their love. Any manager who tries to win a popularity contest is courting disaster. In the movie, the demise of Peck’s predecessor could be traced back to his close attachment to his men. Instead of looking at problems objectively, his mind was clouded by too much empathy for his men. Managers must walk a fine line between jocularity and discipline. Too much familiarity breeds contempt for the manager, and too much discipline can make life unbearable for workers. In Peck’s case, his men initially exhibit slovenly behavior. To curb it, he deliberately intimidates his men to teach them such behavior was unacceptable and discipline would be enforced.

2. A manager should design his department in such a way as it can function without him. Basically, a manager’s task is to do himself out of a job. By doing so, he is displacing the management responsibility on a group of people as opposed to just one. This is a clever way to communicate to workers this is the will of the group, not just one person. If it becomes dependent on just one person, the whole group will fail if the manager fails.

3. Open the lines of communications. The manager must effectively communicate the necessity of a task to his workers, along with its urgency. Only then will they put forth the proper amount of effort it deserves. In the film, Peck gives his men the shock treatment by telling them they are in a “shooting war” and there is no time to coddle them, plus he believes in their abilities. Beyond this, Peck develops a rapport with a young Lieutenant who acts as a spokesman for the flyers. He does this in order to get a pulse of what his young men are thinking.

4. There is no such thing as “hard luck.” The morale of the bomb group plummets under Peck’s predecessor. As much as they liked their Colonel, they felt sorry for themselves, and lacked confidence in their ability to do anything correctly. Such an attitude can be very demoralizing and contagious thereby causing workers to make more mistakes than necessary. A change of attitude is warranted, which leads to the next point…

5. Managers need to build self esteem in their workers, thereby fueling their confidence and building pride in workmanship. The message, “There is dignity in all forms of work,” must come across loud and clear. Sometimes it is beneficial for management to pay special attention to his workers who should respond positively to such attention. Somehow the manager needs to communicate how important or challenging the work is. This means investing such things as time, money, clothes, changing the surroundings, or improving the technology to perform the work. Such token gestures are noticed by workers who appreciate the recognition of management and respond accordingly. With rare exception, workers rise to the occasion when faced with new and exciting challenges, as opposed to tedious and repetitive tasks.

6. Managers must encourage workers to strive for perfection, but realize they may never achieve it. A program of continued practice helps to identify minor flaws in workmanship which can be corrected. In the movie, Peck orders several practice bombing runs to correct weaknesses in targeting and flying in formation. Such practices also raise the awareness of workers to think about their work product and the processes involved with producing it.

7. It is easier to lead workers if they trust you. Quite simply, workers are more likely to follow you if they have confidence in your abilities and decision making skills. This means managers must demonstrate they know what they are doing. Talk is cheap, action is more visible to workers. As such, managers need to go the extra mile further to earn the confidence of their workers. Immoral behavior is not tolerated. If workers suspect the manager is a liar, cheat, or does not support them, they will quickly turn on him.

8. Develop a skills inventory. In the picture, Peck reviews the dossiers of all of the members of the group, studying their strengths and weaknesses. From this, he makes decisions as to assigning people to their area of expertise. In the corporate world, skill inventories are used to track the talents and experiences of workers, along with their level of proficiency. Such a tool is invaluable for selecting people to suitable assignments, not to mention identifying the need for additional training.

9. Identify your weakest workers and encourage them to perform better. Peck assigns a B-17 as the “Leper Colony” where all of the dead-beats of the group are placed. Such recognition encourages them to try harder. In this day of political correctness though, it is unlikely Peck’s tactics would be used. However, it is necessary to somehow put a spotlight on workers who are not performing to their fullest potential. Today, Employee Evaluations are used to document worker strengths and weaknesses, which is normally reviewed between the manager and worker in a one-on-one basis.

10. Get some wins under your belt to build confidence. In the movie, Peck’s group bombs a target that others couldn’t. For their efforts, they were awarded accommodations for distinguished service. This helps build their confidence. This also explains why sports teams have preseason schedules to not only judge the ability of players, but to instill confidence. The same is true in business where it is wise to start small before tackling major assignments. Mentors and coaches should be nearby to offer advice.

11. As manager, articulate your objectives, their urgency, your plan of attack, then lead your workers into battle. Today, it shouldn’t be so much about micromanagement which can stifle worker creativity and initiative. Instead, the manager should establish the right working conditions (corporate culture), provide them with the best training, tools and techniques available, empower them, and turn them loose.

It’s amazing what workers can do with a little leadership, such as conquering the skies over Nazi Germany.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  HOW LIBERALS AND CONSERVATIVES PERCEIVE THE PEOPLE – Our perceptions dictate not only how we will manage workers, but how we want to govern the people.

LAST TIME:  SOCIETY PAGES  – Bottom-line, who are we trying to impress by the society pages?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Business, Management | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

SOCIETY PAGES

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 4, 2014

BRYCE ON SOCIETY

- Bottom-line, who are we trying to impress by the society pages?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

The society pages in the newspapers and magazines are one of my favorite sections, and I actually think they are funnier than the comic strips. I particularly like it when they report on a big ball or some innocuous charity gala of some kind. There is normally a lot of pictures taken at such events where you see people trying to act and pose like movie stars, but actually look a lot worse for wear. I don’t know why people find it important to have their names and faces in the society pages, probably to feed some starving egos, but this nonsense has been going on for a long time now.

In the photos, I’ve noticed the women generally look better than the men, but that’s not too hard to do in this age of the grunge look. The women are well coiffed the best they can, but underneath the umpteen layers of makeup are still some pretty nasty looking three-baggers. It’s really scary when you consider this is the best they are ever going to look. It gives me the willies imagining what they look like first thing in the morning.

Then there are the simple announcements in the paper telling us such things as, “Josephine just returned home from a trip to the south of Timbuktu.” I don’t know what all of the hubbub is about, after all, only the rich and famous go to northern Timbuktu, the rest are considered riffraff from the other side of the tracks.

Wedding anniversary announcements are nice and represent significant milestones in our lives, but there ought to be a law that only silver, golden, or diamond anniversaries be reported, not paper, wood, tin, or any other such nonsense.

Wedding announcements are good for trumpeting news about nuptials, but there should only be a basic line item describing the event, kind of like birth announcements. I’m really not interested in who the caterer was or who attended an event I wasn’t invited to. Actually, I would be more interested in the juicy details of a good divorce, but we tend to sweep such news under the carpet. However, I can visualize something like, “Smith-Jones Divorced on grounds of mental cruelty and sexual incompatibility. Neighbors claimed she didn’t like his friends and he couldn’t stand her parents. He was a dropout from salon school and she received a dishonorable discharge from the Marines. Their four children will be placed in Foster homes until the parents return from the Betty Ford Clinic.”

At least with a divorce, we would really have something to talk about.

Bottom-line, who are we trying to impress by the society pages? Surely, we are not being so childish as to try and make others jealous are we? Actually, I believe the society pages were created only to feed our vanity and try to jockey for position in society. Just remember, no matter how good you think you’ve got it, there is undoubtedly someone out there who can do you one better. As for me, I couldn’t care less.

Originally published: 4/14/2009

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  BUILDING TEAM MORALE THROUGH LEADERSHIP – How a classic World War II movie teaches the basic lessons of leadership.

LAST TIME:  WHY THE FASCINATION WITH HILLARY CLINTON?  – What precisely has she accomplished as First Lady, Senator, and Secretary of State?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Social Issues, Society | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

WHY THE FASCINATION WITH HILLARY CLINTON?

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 2, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- What precisely has she accomplished as First Lady, Senator, and Secretary of State?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Without a doubt, the 2016 Democratic candidate for President of the United States will be Hillary Rodham Clinton. At age 66, she may have made token rumblings she will not run, but the temptation to become the first female president will be too irresistible for her to resist. In his book, “This Town,” author Mark Leibovich describes how the press fawns over the Clintons and treats them like royalty. The media will once again go to bat for the Clintons as opposed to “Uncle Joe” Biden. Today, most people have forgotten her husband was impeached for sexual misconduct during his term as president. The Democrats have forgiven him, blamed the Republicans, and now treat him like as a rock star. Go figure.

After narrowly losing to President Obama in 2008, the presidency is now within Hillary’s grasp, but you have to wonder if she is up to the task. Certainly her husband will become the Commander-in-the-Shadows, and will try to run things behind the scenes, but the big question is whether Hillary can stand on her own two feet. As a public office holder, she has served in various capacities, e.g., First Lady, Senator from New York, and Secretary of State, but you have to wonder what exactly she has accomplished during this time.

There is no question, she is well educated, graduating with distinction from Wellesley College, and earning a law degree from Yale Law School. Her senior thesis at Wellesley was a critique of the tactics of Saul Alinksky, the well-known radical community organizer. It is during her years at Wellesley where she switched political philosophies and became a Democrat, and campaigned for George McGovern in 1972.

Professionally, she was the first female partner at the Rose Law Firm where her earning power sustained the Clintons for several years.

She served two stints as “First Lady”, starting in Arkansas when her husband was governor, and of course in the White House from 1993 – 2001. During the White House years, her big initiative was the Clinton health care plan which failed to pass Congress, representing a major defeat. During this time, she was plagued by several investigations, such as the Whitewater controversy, Madison Guaranty, Travelgate, Filegate, and the apparent suicide of White House counsel Vince Foster. All of this, coupled with the president’s Monica Lewinsky scandal, which led to his impeachment, left a dark cloud over the Clinton administration.

After leaving the White House, Mrs. Clinton replaced Daniel Patrick Moynihan as Senator from New York. She began her tenure by building relationships and serving on a variety of committees. Following 9/11 she voted to support military action in both Afghanistan and Iraq. She was also instrumental in obtaining funding for redevelopment of the World Trade Center in her home state. Domestically, she voted against President Bush’s tax cut packages, which passed in spite of her objections.

During her second term she voted against the 2007 troop surge in Iraq, which was passed, and favored a war-spending bill that tried to set a deadline to withdraw troops from Iraq, which failed.

In 2007 she campaigned for president and narrowly lost the Democratic candidacy to Barack Obama. Following this, she was appointed Secretary of State under Obama where she served during the president’s first term. In the early days, she contacted several world leaders to inform them changes to foreign policy were in the offing, “We have a lot of damage to repair.” This was tied to the perceived Obama “apology tour.”

It was on her watch, in 2011, when the “Arab Spring” began which ignited political tensions and upset the balance of power in the Middle East. It also led to the Libyan Civil War where America was accused of “leading from behind” in deposing the Gaddafi dictatorship. Her career in the State department essentially came to an end following the 2012 9/11 attack on the American diplomatic mission in Benghazi where four Americans were killed, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.

In the Benghazi aftermath, during the U.S. House Oversight Committee hearing on May 8, 2013, Mrs. Clinton was evasive and combative in her testimony, leading to the regretful comment, “What difference – at this point, what difference does it make?” This smacked of arrogance and defiance of Congress and will certainly haunt her on the campaign trail.

Mrs. Clinton may have had a colorful career in politics, but the question remains, “What exactly did she accomplish?” The Clinton Health Care program failed on her watch. She made no significant contribution as Senator, and her career in the State Department will forever be mired in Benghazi. I think the voters are looking for something a little more substantial than her book, “It Takes a Village,” which she wrote as First Lady using a ghostwriter. After twenty years of public service, you would think there would be some major contribution she could point to with pride. Sadly, there is nothing. Her contributions can be described as negligible at best.

So, why the fascination with Hillary? Feminists will, of course, push for Hillary to become the first female president. The Democrats have alleged the GOP is conducting a “War on Women.” This was likely crafted with Hillary in mind and, as such, it is intentionally fallacious.

There is an alternate reason though, the Democrats want to slip Bill Clinton into the White House through the back door. As much as the feminists love Hillary, the Democrats want to put a match set into the White House. So, Yes, Bill Clinton’s legacy during his first term still matters, warts and all. However, one cannot help but wonder if the country can withstand any more Clinton controversies.

About a year ago, I heard comedian Jackie Mason make the comparison of Mrs. Clinton to an airline pilot’s wife. He asked, if the pilot becomes indisposed and cannot fly the plane, does it make sense to ask his wife to captain the plane in his place? In the case of Mrs. Clinton, she may know the ropes, but she hasn’t proven herself behind the wheel. She certainly hasn’t delivered anything of substance which would lead us to believe she is qualified to be president. Then again, we elected a community organizer to the White House and we saw what happened to the country.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  SOCIETY PAGES – Bottom-line, who are we trying to impress by the society pages?

LAST TIME:  APRIL FOOL’S DAY: OUR 43RD ANNIVERSARY  – The fact “PRIDE” has survived for 43 years is a testament to its integrity.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 21 Comments »

APRIL FOOL’S DAY: OUR 43RD ANNIVERSARY

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 1, 2014

BRYCE ON “PRIDE”

- The fact “PRIDE” has survived for 43 years is a testament to its integrity.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Today, April 1st, 2014, represents the 43rd anniversary of the founding of our company, M&JB Investment Company (originally M. Bryce & Associates). I’m not sure why my father chose April 1st for our founding, but he was fond of saying it would be our practical joke on the industry. In the early days, our company’s forte was the “PRIDE” Methodology for Systems Design. This was a step by step approach for building enterprise-wide systems, not just the programming portions. Frankly, it was way ahead of its time as it was based on a simple premise, “A system is a product that can be engineered and manufactured like any other product,” a concept most programmers had difficulty grasping, and still do.

Fortunately we were able to sell it around the world in just about every field of endeavor imaginable. Although we have tweaked the text over time, it is still the same fundamental product we sold back in 1971. Frankly, it remains the best product of its kind as it is logically sound and has stood the test of time. I have never seen anyone fail who has used it faithfully. When you’re done shooting yourself in the foot with Agile programming and need to build something of substance, come and talk to us.

“PRIDE” can now be found on the Internet in paperback form, see “PRIDE” Methodologies for IRM (Information Resource Management).

“PRIDE” was also proven unique in the courtroom in a landmark lawsuit regarding trade secrets. It set many precedents and is often quoted in similar cases.

Over time though, the industry moved away from total systems and focused on just programming (“apps”) which explains why there have been so many botched system projects in recent times; e.g., the Obamacare Web System which cost taxpayers a staggering $634 million to build. Whenever you take a programming approach to building systems, you are doomed to failure. As my father used to say, “If we built bridges the same way we build systems in this country, this would be a nation run by ferryboats.” All I can add today is, “Toot, toot!”

The company was founded in 1971, but in 1985 we moved to Palm Harbor, Florida where we remain to this day.

So happy anniversary “PRIDE”, the only scientific approach for designing, developing, and managing an organization’s information resources. Since 1971, it remains, “Software for the finest computer – the Mind.”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  WHY THE FASCINATION WITH HILLARY CLINTON? – What precisely has she accomplished as First Lady, Senator, and Secretary of State?

LAST TIME:  GREETING A STRANGER  – Try it. You might even enjoy the reaction you receive.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Anniversary, Business, OUR 43RD ANNIVERSARY | 4 Comments »

GREETING A STRANGER

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 31, 2014

BRYCE ON SOCIETY

- Try it. You might even enjoy the reaction you receive.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

In my travels around town, I’ve noticed a lot of sour expressions on people’s faces. Maybe it’s just the snowbirds from up north. There just seems to be a lot of unhappy people walking around these days wearing a sourpuss. In a local restaurant I frequent for lunch, people come in with blank looks on their faces, and exit with the same expression. One would think consuming a good meal would change a person’s disposition, but not so from what I have observed. Then again, maybe it was the meat loaf or stuffed peppers affecting them. More likely, I suspect it is based on our technology addiction or the state of our country that is altering our interpersonal skills.

Whether I am at the post office or a restaurant, it is not unusual for me to greet a stranger and wish them a good day. The reaction by most people though is one of bewilderment or intimidation. Instead of exchanging pleasantries, they look at me like I have three eyes. I can almost hear them saying to themselves, “What did he mean by that?” or “What does he want?” Frankly, nothing. I just want to say hello.

I learned this years ago when I was a young man sitting in the waiting room of my doctor’s office. When I entered, the room was already full of patients representing a variety of ages. There were old magazines to read, and a trashy soap opera on TV which nobody was watching, yet nobody had the courage to change the channel. It was all rather gloomy. Then, all of a sudden, the front door swung open and the mailman walked in briskly, “Good morning everybody! Beautiful day out there, isn’t it?”

He delivered the mail, turned and exited. After the door shut behind him, people seemed to snap out of their sullen trance, smiled, and began to talk with each other. I was taken by how such a simple gesture quickly produced a positive reaction, and have not forgotten the incident. Consequently, this is why I try to warmly welcome some one to our office, be it a delivery man, a customer, or whomever. In turn, people appreciate the attention and respond in kind.

A couple of weeks ago I happened to visit the local WalMart to pick up a prescription. Yes, the Walmartions were out in force that day, but I tried not to let them get me down. On this particular afternoon, as I exited, I saw a young WalMart employee sitting in the smoking area enjoying a small cigar. I judged him to be 18-19 years old. As a fellow cigar smoker, I approached him and kiddingly asked, “Is this the first class smoking section?” The young man looked up puzzled; my question had obviously caught him off guard.

I then asked him, “What kind of cigar are you smoking?” and he began to loosen up. It was a cheap cigar, something he could smoke quickly while on break. This led to a brief discussion on types of cigars and I confided in him my experience smoking my first cigar, a White Owl classic, which I smoked as a teenager behind my friend’s house in Chicago. He laughed and asked me what I smoked now. I then offered him a cigar which he gladly accepted. The whole exchange between the two of us lasted no more than three minutes. Whereas he seemed sullen when I first met him, his spirits were obviously higher as we departed. We never knew each other’s names.

I find it interesting how people tend to shun such repartee and build a force field around themselves. Perhaps worse is the reaction people have when someone greets them, probably because we are suspicious of their motives and do not trust them. Maybe so, but what is the harm of once and awhile saying, “Good morning everybody! Beautiful day out there, isn’t it?” Try it, You might be pleasantly surprised by the reaction you receive.

Maybe there wouldn’t be as many public shootings if we just learned to say “Hello” now and then.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  APRIL FOOL’S DAY: OUR 43RD ANNIVERSARY – The fact “PRIDE” has survived for 43 years is a testament to its integrity.

LAST TIME:  TIM BRYCE: RABBLE-ROUSER?  – Or someone who is passionately curious?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

 
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