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LIGHT-YEARS AHEAD

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 22, 2014

BRYCE ON SYSTEMS

- Using a “Common Core” analogy to explain why our “PRIDE” Methodology is still far ahead.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

It is a strange feeling when you realize you are noticeably ahead of the industry on something. At first it is rewarding, followed by a sense of frustration when you face competition from inferior products, particularly if they are based on pseudo-scientific technology. This leads me to make the boastful claim…

“What we introduced in 1971 as our original “PRIDE” Methodology for System Design, is still light years ahead of the industry.”

It’s not bragging when it is a fact. Our original product back then was based on simple, commonsense principles based on engineering and manufacturing. Since then, we introduced many other concepts and software to support it, such as automated systems design, software used to deduce a system design based on information requirements. I know of no other product or company who was able to emulate our products. This is primarily due to the fact we consider system design as a science as opposed to an art form. By clearly defining our terminology, and proving our concepts, we were able to do such things as automated system design, not to mention priority modeling, organization analysis, impact analysis, and a lot more.

The difference between “PRIDE” and our competitors is analogous to how mathematics is to be implemented under the new “Common Core” curriculum. To illustrate, let’s consider the concept of subtraction:

“Old Fashioned” Way -

32
-12

20

However, the proponents of Common Core now recommend a new convoluted approach:

The “New” Way
32-12=___

12 + 3 = 15
15 + 5 = 20
20 + 10 = 30
30 + 2 = 32
__
20 <-Answer

 

Instead of encouraging simplicity and practicality, the proponents of Common Core want to twist the logic using a more esoteric approach. The same is true in system design. Instead of a standard and simple approach, the industry appears to be content reinventing the wheel. Now we hear about such things as “Agile” or “Extreme”, and “Scrum masters.” Although such concepts were invented specifically for programming, there are those who are trying to apply it to systems.

In 1971, we introduced the following concepts to the world:

1. A system is a product that can be engineered and manufactured like any other product. We applied the concept of a 4-level bill of materials to represent the system hierarchy. From there, the system was designed top-down, and tested and implemented bottom-up, a common engineering/manufacturing technique. This became the rationale for the structure of our methodology which allowed parallel and concurrent development, a radical departure from the classic 5-step “waterfall” approach.

It also provided for the concept of “stepwise refinement,” meaning specifications were defined from the general to the specific in a progressive order, much like what is found in blueprinting.

This concept of thinking of a system as a product is a departure from the mainstream where most developers think of it as nothing more than a collection of programs.

2. Information = Data + Processing. This concept meant there were two basic components to information. If the data was wrong and the processing was correct, the information would be wrong. Conversely, if the data was correct and the processing was wrong, the information would also be wrong. This led to the premise that if the information requirements are incorrect, everything that ensues, in terms of data and processing, will be incorrect. It also led to the idea of sharing and re-using data and system components.

Again, this is still a foreign concept to most people today who do not understand the properties of information and how to use it for design purposes.

3. The only way systems communicate is through data. This implies the need to standardize data for the purpose of eliminating redundancy and promoting information consistency.

Despite the sophisticated data base technology, which has evolved over the years, data redundancy still plagues most companies.

For more on these concepts, see: “Information Systems Theory 101″

These simple concepts led to the embodiment of the “PRIDE” methodology which we introduced in 1971, over 40 years ago. As simple as these concepts were, people resisted them as it was contrary to the thinking of the day, and still is. In particular, programmers had difficulty grasping these simple concepts. In reality, they would be the beneficiaries of the programming specifications resulting from this process. Nonetheless, they would often say, “This is all well and good, but we do not have time to do it right.” Translation: “We have plenty of time to do it wrong.”

Whereas we still think in terms of the “Old Fashioned” way (“PRIDE”), the industry now thinks in terms of the new “Common Core” way. I have no explanation for this other than it must sell a lot of books and seminars. Whereas others offer magic, we offer commonsense.

Yes, “PRIDE” is light years ahead of the industry today, and probably will still be well after my demise.

For more information on the “PRIDE” Methodologies for IRM, see:
http://www.amazon.com/PRIDE-Methodologies-IRM-Tim-Bryce/dp/097861822X/

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  A JOB DESCRIPTION FOR BUSINESS ANALYSIS – What are the duties and responsibilities of the BA?

LAST TIME:  WHO SHOULD WATCH “AMERICA,” THE MOVIE?  – Certainly not just conservatives.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

WHO SHOULD WATCH “AMERICA,” THE MOVIE?

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 20, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- Certainly not just conservatives.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I recently attended a viewing of the movie “America,” featuring Dinesh D’Souza who co-produced “2016: Obama’s America,” a film describing the president’s way of thinking by examining his personal background and the people he met and worked with along the way. The controversial film was released in 2012 just prior to the presidential election. D’Souza is an Indian-born American who has become a political commentator, filmmaker, and author. He also served a stint as an adviser in the Reagan White House. Needless to say, he is a well known promoter of conservative principles and causes.

In his latest offering, D’Souza hypothesizes what would have happened if George Washington had been killed in battle, and the Colonies had lost the Revolutionary War. He doesn’t actually answer this question directly as the British would have surely reenforced their control over the country and cultivated its resources. Instead, he uses this as a clever way of asking a rhetorical question, “What if America didn’t exist?”

To answer this, D’Souza begins with opposing interpretations of America, one based on traditional history and another based on a counter cultural view that is gaining popularity in academia and being taught to our youth. This interpretation is primarily based on Howard Zinn’s book, “A People’s History of the United States,” which is used in college to portray an opposing view of America. Zinn, who passed away in 2010, was a political science professor at Boston University and social activist. In his book, Zinn portrays American history through the eyes of common people, such as the native American tribes, African slaves, and the Mexicans of the Southwest.

According to D’Souza, Zinn’s interpretation of America is one of “theft” by the conquering Europeans; theft of land, resources, labor, and more. This is a radically opposing interpretation of history as has been traditionally taught in school. To support Zinn’s thesis, D’Souza interviews a variety of critics of American exceptionalism who explain their views of why the country is socially and morally corrupt.

After allowing the critics to specify their “indictments” against America, D’Souza patiently answers each criticism and presents an opposing viewpoint. Whereas the anti-Americans cite historical incidents in their arguments, D’Souza does likewise by using such examples as the rapport between Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, Madam C.J. Walker, the first female self-made millionaire in America, and Alexis de Tocqueville, the noted French author of “Democracy in America,” an illuminating analysis of America based on his travels in 1831-1832.

D’Souza concludes the America portrayed by Zinn and others is aimed at undermining the spirit of the country and create a sense of shame. Not just shame of historical events, but also by the fact the country was founded on Christian principles. In contrast, D’Souza argues Americans actually have nothing to be ashamed of, least of all Christianity. He contends the founding fathers designed America to “enable” its citizens with an entrepreneurial spirit thereby encouraging them to boldly go where no one has gone before.

The movie argues this “shame” concept is part of a long range interconnected plot to cast doubt, destroy harmony and promote social upheaval, thereby undermining the American culture which would inevitably lead to radical reforms. To this end, D’Souza describes the teachings of social radical Saul Alinsky and his more notable students, including Hillary Clinton and President Obama.

The intent of the movie is to stimulate discussion as to which interpretation America should embrace. From this perspective, the movie is suited for anyone interested in political theory and American history. Conservatives will enjoy it, and Liberals will undoubtedly criticize it, but it is still worth a watch for them to consider the two distinctly separate viewpoints. From my perspective, it should be required viewing for high school and college students.

More than anything, the “America” movie is a remarkable story of subliminal brainwashing in our country. This is but one, very important, story of the distortion of the American dream, all of which is aimed at social engineering and dismantling the country. Other notions include the sense of “entitlement” and class division though the “have’s” and “have not’s.”

Not everyone is fooled though. Towards the end of the movie, D’Souza inserts a video clip from a speech made by Irish musician Bono at Georgetown University in 2012 where he concludes, “Anyway, it’s not a right-left issue, it’s a right-wrong issue, and America has constantly been on the side of what’s right. Because, when it comes down to it, this is about keeping faith with the idea of America. Because America is an idea, isn’t it?… That’s how we see you around the world, as one of the greatest ideas in human history… The idea, the American idea, is an idea. The idea is that you and me are created equal… This country was the first to claw its way out of darkness and put that on paper. And God love you for it.”

D’Souza asks the viewers of the movie to do nothing more than consider both sides of an argument, not just one, and beware of charlatans who are more interested in the demise of the United States as opposed to promoting its virtues.

Nobody believes our country is perfect, least of all me, but the D’Souza movie asks should we give up in shame, and relinquish our leadership role in the world community, or should we proudly strive to improve ourselves? I am reminded of an old Bryce’s Law, “Systems are built by evolution, not revolution.” Nobody has built the perfect system the first time, and nobody ever will. We can either quit and start all over again or strive for perfection. As for me, I vote for the latter, not the former.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  LIGHT-YEARS AHEAD – Using a “Common Core” analogy to explain why our “PRIDE” Methodology is still far ahead.

LAST TIME:  OUR LAME DUCK PRESIDENT  – The sad thing is, he doesn’t realize he has already become one.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Entertainment, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 8 Comments »

OUR LAME DUCK PRESIDENT

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 18, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS

- The sad thing is, he doesn’t realize he has already become one.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

The expression “Lame Duck” was first used in American politics in the 1860’s during the final days of President Buchanan’s administration, who was succeeded by Abraham Lincoln. Basically, it suggests the politician no longer has any influence as he is preparing to leave office.

Today, President Obama’s popularity numbers are down as the country heads into the midterm elections in November. His influence has deteriorated to the point where very few Democratic politicians want to be seen with him on the campaign trail. Democratic senate candidates such as Mary Landrieu (LA), Mark Begich (AK), Natalie Tennant (WV), and Allison Grimes (KY) are all keeping the president at arm’s length. Mr. Obama’s toxicity likely means the Senate will be surrendered to the GOP who will then control both houses of Congress. Even if this happens, the president will still have veto power which the GOP will likely be unable to override. This of course means we will have two more years of gridlock in Washington, DC. It also officially marks the beginning of the president’s “Lame Duck” status.

Since the beginning of his administration, Mr. Obama has never shown a genuine willingness to “give and take” with the Republicans. This was compounded by the Republicans when they took the House of Representatives in 2010 thereby prohibiting “slam-dunk” legislation offered by the president. The result, massive gridlock.

The parallel to the administration of John Quincy Adams is uncanny. From the beginning of his administration, Mr. Adams lost all credibility with the Congress who operated at odds with him. Not only has Mr. Obama lost the respect and trust of the Republicans, but many people from his own party, and the world stage where it is now well known that America “leads from behind.” Frankly, nobody takes him seriously anymore, and his proposals are rejected out of hand.

The only problem with having a lame duck president now is we desperately need leadership in our executive branch. Between the problems in the Middle East, Russia and the Ukraine, immigration, and the variety of scandals, Mr. Obama is not acting like a Commander-in-Chief. I can accept his many fund-raising activities, golf outings, and vacations, as long as he dealt with the problems at hand. He is not, and, more disturbingly, he gives the appearance he really doesn’t care.

There are talks of impeachment and slapping a lawsuit on the president, but I do not see this occurring unless Mr. Obama does something obnoxiously wrong (a lot of people claim he already has). I for one, remember the dark days of Watergate, as well as Mr. Clinton’s impeachment hearings and lawsuits. It was all rather ugly. I would hate to see us wallow in such turmoil when there is so many other things requiring our attention. Then again, if we remain in gridlock following the election in November, I’m afraid we will be forced to go this route.

This could all change if Mr. Obama was genuinely willing to do a little “give and take” as Presidents Reagan, Bush, and Clinton did. However, it is my understanding Mr. Obama does not seek the counsel of others, particularly past presidents. His resolve to not bend on issues is neither realistic or pragmatic at this stage of the game. We cannot afford to be led by someone with an inflated ego during these dangerous times. The stakes are simply too high. If Mr. Obama falls from grace, as I suspect he will, it will be his stubbornness that will have ultimately did him in. Pride is one thing, failing your country during a crisis is another.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  WHO SHOULD WATCH “AMERICA,” THE MOVIE? – Certainly not just conservatives.

LAST TIME:  WHAT “COPS” TEACHES US  – “Bad boys, bad boys, whatcha gonna do when they come for you…”

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

WHAT “COPS” TEACHES US

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 15, 2014

BRYCE ON LAW ENFORCEMENT

- “Bad boys, bad boys, whatcha gonna do when they come for you…”

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

The “COPS” television program recently began its 27th season. Originally on FOX television, it has since moved over to SPIKE TV. Over the years I sampled some of the episodes, but it wasn’t until SPIKE started playing its “COPS” marathons that I really got hooked on it. I have probably seen hundreds of episodes and I never seem to tire of them.

I’m not sure why it fascinates me, other than the suspects captured represent the dregs of society. I am also surprised how professionally the police officers handle themselves in the face of these bone heads. If it were me, I would probably taser them first and ask questions later; “Zip,” “Zap,” “Zip,” “Zap,”… Even when the criminals are tasered, they somehow continue to resist by chanting, “What I do? What I do?”

The suspects have an excuse for everything and accept no responsibility. Even when they are captured red handed, especially with drugs, they adamantly contend, “That ain’t mine.”

“But I found it on you,” the officer argues back.

“Nope, that ain’t mine.”

Most of the suspects do not carry any form of identification. The cars they drive (or stole) are somehow “borrowed” from a friend or relative who doesn’t exist. You have to wonder how the police officers keep a straight face when they hear the excuses. It’s hilarious. I particularly like it when the police officer says, “What do you think, I’m stupid? I wasn’t born yesterday.” Nope, “That ain’t mine.”

I find it amusing even after the police have read the suspects their Miranda rights that they continue to talk and volunteer information to the police. The officers play this well. For example, after reading the suspects their rights and asking if they understand them, the officer’s next question is, “Okay, what were you doing in there?” And the suspects begin to babble away freely.

The drugs of choice on the show are primarily methamphetamine, crack, cocaine, heroin, ecstasy, and marijuana is everywhere. I suppose they are all unrelated, one doesn’t lead to another, right?

Having watched the show so many times, I contend the people in possession of drugs is anyone with tattoos and piercings, no shirts, pants hanging half-way down their butt, with a baseball cap on backwards or are driving a POS. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure this out. No wonder the police pull over so many people for “suspicious behavior.” The suspects might as well slap a sign on their car stating, “Drugs on board. Come and get me.” They should be tasered just for how they look. None seem to have a job, and they’re all out on parole. Instead of cleaning up their act though, they would rather carry a gun or deal drugs. No wonder we have so many career criminals.

I’ve also come to the conclusion that my wife and I are the last ones not to have tattoos, take drugs, are under the influence, or who haven’t stolen a car. God I feel old. It’s scary when you consider there are more of “them” as opposed to “us.”

Critics contend the “COPS” program trivializes police work and focuses on the poor. Hardly, it simply shows what they have to deal with on a routine basis (which is not good). Yes, there are moments when the officers have to get physical with some suspects, but my hat is off to them in terms of maintaining their composure and remaining civil and objective even when faced with these knuckleheads. If it were me, all you would hear is “Zip,” “Zap,” “Zip,” “Zap,”…

After reading this, some might accuse me of lacking compassion. Not true, but I no longer have patience for these products of immoral parenting.

Next time you need a good laugh at some dunderheads, or want to watch people performing their job professionally, tune in “COPS” or their sister show, “JAIL” where they show how suspects are booked and incarcerated. Both shows portray law enforcement personnel in a positive light.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  OUR LAME DUCK PRESIDENT – The sad thing is, he doesn’t realize he has already become one.

LAST TIME:  BECOMING AN EDUCATED VOTER  – How to become conversant in politics and government.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Crime, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 5 Comments »

BECOMING AN EDUCATED VOTER

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 13, 2014

BRYCE ON GOVERNMENT

- How to become conversant in politics and government.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

In 1835, noted historian and political commentator Alexis de Tocqueville, a Frenchman, published his famous book, “Democracy in America,” which was an analysis of our young country as compared to those in Europe. This was based on his travels through America in 1831 and 1832. The book, which is frequently referenced even to this day, contains his observations on the young country, everything from its geographical layout, to its culture, and particularly its new political system as a democratically elected republic as opposed to a monarchy.

Tocqueville was particularly taken by the American public education system. He was amazed to see children as young as second grade be completely literate, something normally reserved for the aristocracy in Europe. He was also taken by how knowledgeable children were in the workings of the government as defined by the U.S. Constitution. He wrote, “It cannot be doubted that, in the United States, the instruction of the people powerfully contributes to the support of a democratic republic;”

When you compare the America of the early 19th century to today, you will find students, even college graduates, who have no sense of history, no sense of the mechanics of our government at any level, and no sense of current events. Somehow we dropped the ball along the way. We now have a couple of generations of Americans who are content to limp along as apathetic sheeple. The second graders of the 1830’s are mental giants by comparison. Not surprising, the politicians of today appeal to the voters through emotion rather than logic. It has become too easy to deceive and misdirect the under informed public.

However, for those who want to get back on track, to learn about the government and current events, there are plenty of resources available.

1. Discuss – learn to discuss such subjects with your family, friends and colleagues, but be careful, political discussion can lead to arguments and disrupt harmony. If you can find such people though interested in participating in discussions, it can make for some interesting mental gymnastics.

In schools, it would be nice to see government and history courses reintroduced, and, No, not just from the 20th century forward. How about the 18th or 17th centuries instead?

Understand your rights as a citizen and the the mechanics of government by becoming familiar with our governing docs.

Two books come to mind which can help:

“The 5000 Year Leap” by W. Cleon Skousen, is an excellent primer to describe why our government is organized the way it is. As far as I’m concerned, this should be on the reading list for every high school student.

For those who wish to be a little more ambitious, let me suggest Tocqueville’s “Democracy in America”, which provides interesting insight as to the differences between the United States and the rest of the world. The book is rather thick, but stimulating nevertheless.

Learn to read and watch the news. More importantly, challenge the accuracy of the news and beware of newscasters trying to spin it.

2. Write – Want to do more? How about writing your Congressmen? Whether you voted for them or not, these people are charged to represent you. Do not hesitate to ask questions or discuss your views on certain subjects. Remember, they work for you, not the other way around. You can also write the President of your concerns. Also learn to contact your local and state officials.

While you’re at it, post your views in your local newspapers in the “Letters to the Editor” section.

You may also wish to contact the various political parties to pose a question or comment, such as the Democratic Party, the Republican Party, or the Libertarian Party.

Linking to such political and news organizations via social media outlets, such as Twitter and Facebook, is also a good way of staying abreast of news stories, and opinions.

3. Activism – finally, volunteer your time in various political and nonprofit organizations, thereby allowing you to rub elbows with people of similar interests and help push forward those items you feel are important. As we approach the mid-term elections, and you are interested in party politics, you may want to hold a sign or walk a neighborhood in support or your favorite politician or cause. Just remember to maintain your composure, especially when doors are closed in your face.

As Tocqueville suggests, citizens have an implicit civic responsibility to become educated in the workings of government and to maintain a sense of history. Becoming a sheeple is not conducive for improving government.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  WHAT “COPS” TEACHES US – “Bad boys, bad boys, whatcha gonna do when they come for you…”

LAST TIME:  UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE  – No, it is not an educational institution, nor is it really difficult to understand.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Government, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 5 Comments »

UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 11, 2014

BRYCE ON GOVERNMENT

- No, it is not an educational institution, nor is it really difficult to understand.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

One of the biggest myths in American government is that the President and Vice President are directly elected by the people. Nothing could be further from the truth. Get it out of your head now. In fact, the Constitution mentions nothing of such a popular vote. Instead, the President and Vice President are INDIRECTLY elected by the people, and for good reason. Allow me to explain…

The vote for President and VP is actually a vote for the electors of the state who will later cast the true votes. This is usually done in accordance with the wishes of the voters of each state. However, each state has their own set of rules for selecting electors and how they will vote. Their only restraint, from a federal perspective, is they can only appoint as many electors as there are members of Congress representing their state. For example, Florida has two US Senators and 27 members of the House of Representatives, for a total of 29 electors, none of which may be members of Congress. Since each state uses a “winner-take-all” approach, most electors are members of the winning party.

The “Electoral College” is not an educational institution, but all of the electors of all of the states in the union along with the District of Columbia, for a total of 538 electors and a minimum of 270 votes to elect a president. After each state ratifies its electoral votes, it is sent to the nation’s capitol for counting in a joint session of Congress on January 4th. The official count is later filed in the National Archives.

The big question though is, “Why do we vote this way?” Many people believe a popular vote should suffice. Fortunately, our founding fathers thought otherwise. At the time of the writing of the Constitution, America was primarily a rural country. However, cities like Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Richmond, and Charleston, had substantial populations. Conceivably, politicians could have won the popular vote simply by winning these urban areas. This would have meant the interests of the rural areas would have been ignored, or whole states completely. To overcome this problem, the framers of the Constitution devised the Electoral College to maintain parity between all of the states, including both rural and urban areas. In this way, the college protects the rights and interests of all states, not just those with large populations.

To illustrate, in the 2000 presidential election, Al Gore won the large metropolitan states, but George Bush won more of the smaller rural states. Based on the number of electoral votes, Bush won the election by a razor-thin number of votes, six. This meant that the interests of ALL of the states were considered, not just the “swing states.”

Following the 2000 election, then Senator-elect Hillary Clinton, feeling that Al Gore had been cheated of the presidency, called for the elimination of the Electoral College. According to Hillary, “We are a very different country than we were 200 years ago. I believe strongly that in a democracy, we should respect the will of the people and to me, that means it’s time to do away with the Electoral College and move to the popular election of our president.” (Nov 10, 2000)

Obviously, Mrs. Clinton fails to understand we reside in a democratically elected republic, not a democracy. Admittedly, most Americans misunderstand the concept of the Electoral College, thereby making it fodder for debate. Nevertheless, the electoral college remains a fair and equitable approach for representing the interests of ALL of the states in the nation, not just those with large metropolitan areas. Without the electoral college, the large metropolitan areas would decide the direction of the country, not smaller towns and villages. In other words, cities such as New York, Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas, San Francisco and Los Angeles would dictate the interests of the country, and not places like Des Moines, Scranton, Chillicothe, Morgantown and Macon.

It is not rational to discard or abandon something simply because we do not understand it.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  BECOMING AN EDUCATED VOTER – How to become conversant in politics and government.

LAST TIME:  60+ YEARS OF JAMES BOND (007)  – The characters have evolved and adapted to the times, making it just as relevant today, as when it first debuted.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

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60+ YEARS OF JAMES BOND (007)

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 8, 2014

BRYCE ON ENTERTAINMENT

- The characters have evolved and adapted to the times, making it just as relevant today, as when it first debuted.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)

To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

My fascination with James Bond, code named 007 of British Intelligence, began 50 years ago with the movie “Goldfinger.” Although author Ian Fleming introduced the character and story line in 1953 in a 12 volume set of books, it was “Goldfinger” that made the franchise. “Dr. No” and “From Russia with Love” preceded “Goldfinger,” but it was the third movie in the series which caught the public’s imagination. Maybe it was the Aston Martin DB5 with its bag of tricks that caught our attention, or the girl murdered in gold paint, the henchman “Oddjob” with his steel rimmed bowler, or Pussy Galore and her flying circus. Actually, it was the whole package we found very avant-garde and provocative, thereby making “Goldfinger” a smash hit. So much so, the producers rushed “Dr. No” and “From Russia with Love” back into theaters as reruns to capitalize on the Bond hysteria.

James Bond appealed to both men and women. Sean Connery was the perfect candidate to launch the character. Ian Fleming had wanted Roger Moore, but it was Connery who got the nod. For men, Connery had a coolness about him, he had a way with the ladies, knew his way around a casino, got to play with clever tools and weapons (“toys”), and was very resourceful when he had to be, even in how he fought. For women, Connery was great looking, exuded confidence, and as I said, had a way about him which caused women to gravitate towards him, even to this day.

The Bond character invented by Fleming was based on several agents he knew during his tenure in British Intelligence during WW2. However, there really was a James Bond, but he was nothing like Fleming’s character. It is explained in the book, “A Man Called Intrepid.”

There has always been a debate about which actor played the best Bond. For my money, it was Sean Connery. Sure he could deliver a clever line, but it was his coolness under pressure that made him credible in my eyes. His fight scene on the train with actor Robert Shaw in “From Russia with Love” showed his resourcefulness. Bond may have been trained in martial arts, but he broke the rules in defeating his opponent. This was repeated in “Goldfinger” when he fought Oddjob.

Of the six actors who played Bond (not counting the early “Casino Royale” starring David Niven), here is how I rank them:

1-Sean Connery – appealed to both sexes. Established the character and made him believable.
2-Daniel Craig – I wasn’t sold on Craig at first, but I think Fleming would have been proud of his portrayal in “Casino Royale.”
3-Timothy Dalton – a tie. Both Dalton and Brosnan were competent and didn’t overplay the role.
3-Pierce Brosnan
4-Roger Moore – was Ian Fleming’s choice, not mine. Too pretty to be Bond.
5-George Lazenby – succeeding Connery was a hard act to follow, but where did they dig this guy up?

Bond was surrounded by some interesting supporting characters. First, Bond reported to “M” as head of “MI6,” the Secret Intelligent Service. Actor Bernard Lee was the first to play the role capably, as did Judy Dench. Miss Moneypenny was the personal secretary to M and often flirted with Bond. Lois Maxwell owned the character for years. The character of “Q” (for Quartermaster) was concerned with issuing Bond his “toys” for his various assignments. There was always a playful rivalry between the two. Desmond Llewelyn played the character for over 30 years. Someone decided to use Monty Python’s John Cleese in the role, but that flopped (thank God).

As to Bond’s “toys,” I had two favorites; first, the Aston Martin DB5 with ejector seat, twin machine guns, spinning axle blades, oil and nail ejectors, rear window bullet deflector, and smoke screen. I cannot think of too many men who wouldn’t want to take this for a spin. My second favorite toy was “Little Nellie,” the Wallis WA-116 Agile mini-helicopter made famous in the 1967 film, “You Only Live Twice.” Sheer genius. Bond also had a personal fondness for the Walther PPK as his handgun of choice. And let us not forget Bond’s Vodka Martini, “shaken, not stirred.”

As to the best Bond movie, my vote goes to “Goldfinger.” Prior to this, Bond was fighting the evil SPECTRE empire (SPecial Executive for Counter-intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge and Extortion). This was all phoney-baloney for my taste. Instead Auric Goldfinger (played by Gert Fröbe) devises a very sophisticated scheme to enhance the value of his gold, while creating an economic panic for the Communists to capitalize on. Even though it meant capturing Fort Knox, Goldfinger’s scheme was truly diabolical as opposed to the plots by the other Bond villains.

James Bond spawned a wave of espionage movies and television shows, such as “Matt Helm,” “Our Man Flint,” “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,” “I Spy,” “The Wild, Wild West,” “Get Smart,” and many more. Bond outlived them all and still influences our perception of the world of the secret service.

Fleming died at age 56 in 1964, the same year “Goldfinger” debuted. Although he enjoyed some success, he never realized how his character turned into a cultural institution. After his twelve books had been made into movies, other authors stepped up to fill the void Fleming left behind. By then, it was a formula.

Bond has been described as predictable and iconic. Yet, we still come back for more. Actually, it is the formula that makes Bond work: a rugged and confident operative who is sent to solve a cockamamie plot to conquer the world, and enjoy the perks of life along the way.

Due to age, the actors have had to be replaced more than once, the toys have changed, as had the type of music used in the opening credits, but it will be interesting to see how long the James Bond formula for movie magic will endure. Who knows, maybe 100 years, which is something I do not believe Fleming would have imagined.

The masterminds behind the Bond movies were, of course, Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli who formed Eon Productions (Everything Or Nothing). Through their careful planning, Bond has evolved and remained relevant. Both partners passed away some time ago, but Eon remains under the tight control of the family, most notably Barbara Broccoli.

I have debated this subject on more than one occasion. Some people think Roger Moore was the best Bond; young people prefer Daniel Craig. Some like the newer movies, others prefer the classics from the 1960’s. Actually it really doesn’t matter. We all find something of personal interest in the Bond movies we can relate to, be it a toy, a character, or the plot.

And, Yes, I thought the song “Goldfinger” by Shirley Bassey was the best.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE – No, it is not an educational institution, nor is it really difficult to understand.

LAST TIME:  10 MOST WANTED LIST  – A list for improving America.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Entertainment | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

10 MOST WANTED LIST

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 6, 2014

BRYCE ON SOCIETY

- A list for improving America.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

The “Ten Most Wanted” list was a brainchild of former FBI Director, J. Edgar Hoover, as a means to solicit the public’s assistance in capturing the hardened criminals of the day. Over the years, it has proven to be an effective means for assisting in the apprehension of such desperatos. I still check the list from time to time to see who is on it. I have also noticed many magazine articles today are developing a list of top tips, tricks, or celebrities doing this or that.

Recently, I started to consider another type of “10 Most Wanted” list, something also requiring the public’s assistance, but a list of those items to make this country great again. Some items are aimed at our government, others at our culture. Here then is my…

“10 Most Wanted List for improving America”

10. Balance the Budget – the notion our country cannot operate within its own means is mind-boggling. A balanced budget would greatly facilitate cutting the deficit through spending reductions and make us less dependent on outsiders. Some believe our government is too big and complex to implement such a budget. If so, perhaps it is time to reduce our size and complexity.

9. Create a responsible press – it has been a long time since we have referred to the mainstream media as “fair and balanced.” Correct me if I am wrong, but I thought the purpose of the “fourth estate” was to track government, regardless of party, and protect the interests of the people, not those in charge.

8. Immigration – What we are currently witnessing is nothing less than an invasion by outsiders. The floodgates need to be closed at our borders, even if this means using the National Guard. It is simple math, regardless of our compassion, we cannot afford to take care of everyone. Heck, we have trouble taking care of our own people.

7. Energy Independence – foreign energy has cost America greatly, both in terms of lives and expenses. We have the resources and technology to become independent, but not the will. This item alone would put the country back to work and return us to a leadership role in the world.

6. Taxes – a fair and equitable form of income tax is long overdue. A reduction of our business taxes would also stimulate business and make us more competitive, not to mention returning jobs back home.

5. Improved economy – a smaller and less intrusive government would greatly improve our GDP, and reduce the welfare state by putting more people back to work.

4. The truth – some call it “transparency,” I call it the truth. Yes, I would like to know what honestly happened at the IRS, the VA, at Benghazi, Fast & Furious, the Associated Press, etc. I would like to see this investigated quickly and properly, take corrective action, and move along. I am not one for wallowing in messes. Let’s clean it up and restore the credibility and trust in our government.

3. Society – I would like to see a society where the individual is encouraged to develop an entrepreneurial attitude, take risks, and be amply rewarded for taking them. I would like to see less government barriers, and more breaks to help in this regards.

2. Peace – although my generation missed WW2, I have only known us to be at peace for a handful of years. It would be nice to know a world at peace, but there are too many forces at work who will not allow us to have it. If we are to remain the policeman of the world, I would like to see the world community pay their fair share.

1. Morality – some simple morality could go a long way to improving our quality of life, such as honesty, integrity, accountability, responsibility, courtesy, respect, citizenship and a little patriotism. A little pride in ourselves and our profession (e.g., craftsmanship), would certainly be a welcome change.

Obviously there are many other things I would like to see implemented, but these represent my “Top 10.” Some people would say I am being naive about these items, that none of them are possible. Maybe so, but I would like to see us try. Even the FBI doesn’t catch their Top 10 all of the time, but they never give up. Neither should we.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  60+ YEARS OF JAMES BOND (007) – The characters have evolved and adapted to the times, making it just as relevant today, as when it first debuted.

LAST TIME:  IS IT TIME FOR CENSORSHIP?  – It’s not the NRA; it’s Hollywood.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics, Social Issues, Society | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

IS IT TIME FOR CENSORSHIP?

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 4, 2014

BRYCE ON SOCIETY

- It’s not the NRA; it’s Hollywood.

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Once again, it is time to go out on a limb. I recently listened to a radio interview with one of the young wackos accused of shooting up a school. Frankly, he sounded rather calm, cool and collected as he described how he planned his assault. In addition to guns, he had pipe bombs and Molotov cocktails prepared for backup. When asked how he learned to make such devices, he replied it was from the movies and television. His candid comments did not surprise me. We have long suspected the media has an adverse effect on our youth, and it does indeed appear that life imitates art, not the other way around. By glamorizing violence, not just guns, Hollywood has changed the social mores of our culture.

As a kid, I played a lot of “Cowboys and Indians” and “Cops and Robbers,” and, Yes, toy guns were included in our playtime, even if it was nothing more than our thumb and index finger. I also had my share of cap guns. Somehow though, we understood the difference between toys and the real thing. The thought of mistaking a real gun for a cap gun was simply unimaginable. You knew better. Then again, we also played a lot of “hide and seek,” baseball, tag, swimming, etc. In other words, the gun games did not consume our time.

The violence of today though is more pervasive, maybe because the entertainment industry is more pervasive. Instead of just three or four channels on television, now there are hundreds. The Internet allows us to look up just about anything regardless of its legality. And as of this writing, seven of the current top ten movies all have explicit violence. When I look at movie trailers, such as “Transformers: Age of Extinction,” the computer generated graphics suggest anything is possible, not to mention a total indifference to human life. When you consider our youth are watching such movies regularly, not to mention playing similar computer games, and watching television programs promoting violence, is it any wonder that children are becoming indifferent to life?

We have always understood the power of the motion picture industry. From 1930 to 1968, the Hays Code was used to keep movie violence and sex in check. According to the Code, the following items were not to appear in the movies:

1. Pointed profanity – by either title or lip – this includes the words “God,” “Lord,” “Jesus,” “Christ” (unless they be used reverently in connection with proper religious ceremonies), “hell,” “damn,” “Gawd,” and every other profane and vulgar expression however it may be spelled;
2. Any licentious or suggestive nudity – in fact or in silhouette; and any lecherous or licentious notice thereof by other characters in the picture;
3. The illegal traffic in drugs;
4. Any inference of sex perversion;
5. White slavery;
6. Miscegenation (sex relationships between the white and black races);
7. Sex hygiene and venereal diseases;
8. Scenes of actual childbirth – in fact or in silhouette;
9. Children’s sex organs;
10. Ridicule of the clergy;
11. Willful offense to any nation, race or creed;

These, of course, have all been violated and most are now commonplace on television. Also notice they were more concerned with sex than with violence back then. This all changed in late 1968 with the advent of the MPAA film rating system (G – X). Rating systems are fine, but they are useless if nobody enforces them. Next time you are at the theater, see how many young people are checked by the box office for their identity.

Is it time to tighten up censorship standards? If the people who commit random public shootings are any indication, quite possibly. We would all like to believe we are mature enough to watch whatever we want, but this is evidently not so and it is time to exercise some control over who sees what. For example, the Transformer movie has a PG-13 rating. From the violence I saw, it should carry an R rating at the very least. Then again, nobody will be checking identities.

Violent movies appear to create a fantasy land for some viewers who cannot distinguish fiction from reality. A program of stepped up censorship will inevitably affect motion pictures, television, computer games, and the Internet. It will undoubtedly be unpopular, and people will scream their first amendment rights are being violated. However, the harsh reality is we have to learn to live together in the real world, not in fantasy land.

Remember, the objective of censorship is to define what is morally right and wrong. If people were taught this properly, there would be no need for censorship.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  10 MOST WANTED LIST – A list for improving America.

LAST TIME:  THE WHITE LINE  – What does this parable tell us about ourselves?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Media, Society | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

THE WHITE LINE

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 1, 2014

BRYCE ON SOCIETY

- What does this parable tell us about ourselves?

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Herman owned a large swath of property out in the country, sitting on a few hundred acres of farmland. The property had been in the family for several years and Herman profited greatly from it. Now, as he was getting older, his sons had picked up the management of the farm and Herman could slow down a bit. Late in the afternoon, he would often find himself sitting on his front porch drinking an iced tea. It was quiet and peaceful, maybe more than he cared for. The farm was wedged between two rural towns and the road stretched around Herman’s farm causing motorists to travel several miles out of the way.

This didn’t seem right to Herman. The people of the county had always been good to him and he wanted to somehow devise a way to show his appreciation and help others. He then got it in his head to build a road through his property and let people drive through it, thereby cutting down the distance between towns from fifteen miles to five.

Herman took it upon himself to build the road. He had an old bulldozer which was still in good shape, and he carved out a straight two-lane road and covered it with tar and gravel. He wanted to keep the road simple as he expected people would use good judgement, but for safety purposes, he painted a white line down the middle. Before opening the road he posted a simple sign on both ends saying, “Please practice courtesy on the road and drive safely – Your neighbor, Herman.” He didn’t post any signs to denote a speed limit, and there was no need for stop signs as it was simply an express lane through his property.

The local newspaper heralded the new road and praised Herman for his generosity. Local government officials were concerned though and wanted to take charge, but Herman steadfastly refused as he knew government had a tendency to complicate matters.

When the road opened, people began to drive on it almost immediately. Herman enjoyed the attention and would sit in a chair next to the side of the road and wave at the passing motorists. This became a daily ritual. It appeared Herman’s plan was working fine. People were maintaining a reasonable speed and practiced a little courtesy on the road. Herman kept studying the traffic flow and was amazed how well people followed the white line.

Herman started to think about how a simple white line seemed to control driving patterns. He wondered what would happen if he moved the white line, just a little. He selected a section of road to be used as an experiment. There he repainted the white line by moving it to one side by twelve inches. This meant one side was slightly squeezed and the other wider. In another section he squiggled the line to give it a wavy appearance.

The next day, Herman sat in his chair and watched the drivers on the road. Interestingly, drivers who encountered the “thin” section of road slowed down and observed the line. Conversely, drivers on the “wide” side picked up speed. Remarkably, people would begin to swerve their car on the section marked by the wavy line. Herman thought this was particularly amusing as the road was straight.

Next, Herman removed a section of the white line and replaced it with a line of small circles, triangles and squares. He observed people slowed down when approaching this section, as they didn’t quite understand the meaning of the symbols, but respected each side of the road nevertheless.

The next day, Herman removed all of the anomalies and put the white line down the middle of the road again. This appeared to relieve the drivers and harmony returned to the highway.

From this exercise, Herman concluded people want uniformity and discipline in their lives. They are ready to accept simple rules for the purpose of cooperation. Although they could work around variances, they seemed to prefer some predictability through standardization. Such discipline meant people could think about other things as opposed to worrying about changes in the rules of the road.

Under this arrangement, Herman discovered most drivers operated their vehicles in a cooperative manner. There was no bumper-to-bumper slow downs, people would wave others to pass them at opportune moments, and there was no cursing or one finger salutes. It was just a nice comfortable ride which everyone enjoyed.

One day though, a young motorist discovered the road and drove pell-mell across it. Not only did he drive fast, but he dodged and weaved between cars, honk his horn and yell at drivers as he passed. After witnessing this, Herman became concerned and waved the motorist over to the side of the road. He discovered the young man’s name was “Joe” and Herman judged him to be in his early twenties.

After Herman introduced himself, he asked the young man to slow down a bit and be a little more courteous on the road. He reminded him that this was his road and he allowed others to use it. Joe just laughed loudly in Herman’s face, gunned the engine, and sped away, leaving tire tracks in the road.

Joe ignored Herman’s request and continued to be a pest on the road. Whenever Herman tried to wave him over to the side of the road, Joe would just speed by him and laugh. Some of the motorists began to complain to Herman about Joe’s antics and asked him to do something about it.

Despite Herman’s numerous attempts to stop Joe, it was to no avail. He even considered adding speed bumps in the road, but that defeated Herman’s objective of creating a comfortable ride. Nor was Herman interested in establishing a traffic cop to prevent Joe from using the road. He just wanted simple harmony on the road, but such was not to be. Finally, Herman couldn’t tolerate Joe or the criticisms anymore. He realized his noble experiment had failed. Consequently, he closed the road to everyone.

The lesson here should be obvious, despite the simplest rules or laws, there is always someone who wants to violate them. They may think they are above the law, that it doesn’t pertain to them, or they simply take pleasure in disrupting the lives of others and status quo. Bottom-line, Herman and the townspeople learned the hard way that it takes only a few to disrupt the lives of the many.

It is interesting what we learn from painting a simple white line. It influences how we will act and socialize, thereby denoting our perception of others, such as respect, cooperation, and basic common courtesy. A white painted line tells us a lot about the type of people we are, not to mention life in general.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  IS IT TIME FOR CENSORSHIP? – It’s not the NRA; it’s Hollywood.

LAST TIME:  40TH ANNIVERSARY OF NIXON’S RESIGNATION  – Did Watergate teach us anything?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Morality, Social Issues, Society | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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