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Software for the finest computer – The Mind

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FOR THE LOVE OF LAWYERS

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 13, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– What’s the difference between a lawyer and a catfish?

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Of all of the professions out there, I think being an attorney has to be one of the most awkward. People tend to either love them or hate them, but most seem to regard them as a necessary evil. Lawyers are well aware of this which often causes awkward social situations for them. Consequently, they are somewhat cliquish and socialize amongst themselves. Whenever lawyers and judges get together, they have to be careful what they say as it might be used against them or they might need a political favor sometime down the road. Being “on-guard” 24/7 can cause anyone to become uptight.

Some people hold attorneys in high regard as some sort of lofty intellectuals. As for me, I see them more as the original Systems Analysts who are knowledgeable about the legal system and know how to traverse it. Nothing more, nothing less.

If an attorney is proficient in his or her profession, the next logical progression is to either become a judge or politician (as they are the ones who typically write legislation). I tend to believe such politicians spend an inordinate amount of time worrying about verbiage and chalking up political brownie points than getting anything done, but I digress. The point is, lawyers are naturally inclined to become political. They can’t help it, it’s in their DNA.

Actually, most attorneys aren’t bad people and, believe it or not, possess a good sense of humor. So why do so many people hate them? Actually, I think there are certain types of lawyers that malign the profession, namely “ambulance chasers” (personal injury) and divorce lawyers. I think this is where the adjectives “frivolous” and “ruthless” were derived from, but it is this small group of attorneys that give the profession a black eye and probably caused Shakespeare to call for all of them to be killed.

Whenever I tell a lawyer joke to my attorney friends, they politely chuckle but I can tell it gnaws on them. Nonetheless, they say nothing. As tasteless as the joke may be, they never utter a word in defense of their profession as it might offend someone. Again, they have to be on guard 24/7, but it kind of makes me wonder what kind of jokes lawyers tell when they are amongst themselves, probably Doctor related.

As a note, for a comprehensive listing of attorney jokes, see Lawyer-Jokes.us on the Internet which seems to have all of the classics, such as:

Q: What’s the difference between a lawyer and a catfish?

A: One is a slimy, bottom dwelling, scum sucker. The other is a fish.

First published: September 15, 2008

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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BEING A CAREGIVER

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 8, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– How it affected my life.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

For the last six years I have been a caregiver for my wife and mother, both of whom suffered from COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) which ultimately claimed both their lives. It was a rough road we traveled as I watched the disease slowly beat them down and break their spirits.

When I was about ten years old, my great grandfather passed away, leaving his wife a widow and alone. Fortunately, my grandmother stepped in and brought her in to live with her and my grandfather. The loss of her spouse was unbearable to my great grandmother as they had been together well over fifty years. Heartbroken, she died less than a year later. As a young man though, I learned the lesson of how the family took care of its own. This is what ultimately drove me to take care of both my wife and mother.

For years, I would wake up early to get some work done on my computer before they woke up. I would then run between homes to take care of them. Fortunately, my mother lived nearby in my neighborhood.

I quickly assumed new responsibilities, such as:

* Preparing their medications and vitamins for the day.

* Preparing and cleaning their nebulizer machines for breathing treatments.

* Maintained their oxygen machines which would from time to time require new lines and filters.

* Helping them get to and from the kitchen, either in a walker or wheelchair.

* Preparing meals for them, including snacks.

* Took them to doctor appointments.

* Entertained them, either through games, newspaper puzzles, rides around town, or just talking with them.

* And a long list of home maintenance chores, such as watering plants, making beds, grocery shopping, washing clothes, car maintenance, paying bills, etc.

In between all of this, I would work out of an office at both houses.

For six years I did this faithfully. Once in a blue moon I would get a chance to escape for a couple of days of fishing, but I would have to rely on relatives to substitute for me which was helpful but difficult for their schedules. Even when I was away, I couldn’t really relax as I kept worrying about them.

I am certainly not looking for accolades as I did this out of devotion to them. Day-in and day-out for six years, I felt like I was on a never-ending treadmill. It finally came to an end recently; my wife passed away just over a year ago, and my mother about a month ago.

Now I can reflect on their passing and what I went through. There really wasn’t much we could do medically for them. All I could do was to try and make them comfortable. Throughout all of this, I got the uneasy feeling they were actually training me to be alone, which is what I am now.

It seems somewhat eerie now as I no longer have a timetable to maintain and can catch up on my sleep. I suspect I can finally slip away for a longer vacation, but it seems odd for me to think this way. I still have this nagging feeling I should be doing something for them, but I now have to challenge myself to find a new direction. It all seems strange to me.

All of the oxygen machines have been turned off and returned to the vendor. I no longer hear their constant hum. I have disposed of all of the medications and processed considerable paperwork. It’s quiet now, deafeningly so.

Being a caregiver can be very demanding. I would often go to bed early as I was mentally exhaused. Occasionally, I would have to get up in the middle of the night to take care of an emergency for them, so I learned to sleep lightly. So, Yes, it is easy to burn yourself out if you are not careful. I found having a good friend to listen to you was incredibly important to maintain your faculties.

In spite of all this, I would give up everything just to talk with my wife or mother again. It was a hell of a lot of work, but I would do it all over again in a heartbeat.

Yes, families should take care of their own. If we didn’t, how can we say we honestly loved them?

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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THE THREE PRINCIPLES OF THE PRESS

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 6, 2021

BRYCE ON THE NEWS MEDIA

– What the press knows about Americans.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I recently gave a speech at the North Suncoast Republican Club in Homosassa (Citrus County) regarding the press, a favorite subject of mine as I have first-hand experience in how they operate, up close and personal. As you may remember, in 2016 I traveled with the press in Florida to cover the Trump rallies. Following this, I wrote a column regarding my experiences (click HERE).

In speaking to the Homosassa group, I articulated how the press tries to manipulate the American public. There are three principles the press relies on:

1. PEOPLE DO NOT WANT TO KNOW THE TRUTH

Actually, this is something I learned in business many years ago. Back then, we would be contracted by companies to audit how their system analysts and programmers built information systems. We discovered project teams who took a disciplined and methodical approach quietly and professionally went about their business. Even though their projects came in on time and withing budget, they were eclipsed by project teams who ran by the seat of their pants in a helter-skelter mode of operation. Remarkably, this latter group received accolades from management, not the former. This was a case of the “squeaky wheel getting the most oil,” which was unfair. Executives didn’t like it when we pointed this out. They saw their helter-skelter bunch as firefighters who would come in and rescue software snafus at all hours. When we pointed out their “firefighters” were actually the chief “arsonists,” this did not sit well with the executives.

What this points out is our beliefs are based on our perceptions, not necessarily what is reality. As an old systems man, I can assure you, if the input is wrong, the output will be wrong. It is, therefore, essential to control the input, which the news media has mastered for some time now. If you watch or read the news today, it is less about the truth, and more about political dogma (spin) which people prefer as they do not want to waste their time investigating the news and will trust those networks who most closely reflect their perspective of the world.

So, it is not so much the news media is not telling the truth as it is the people do not honestly want to know it, and the press capitalizes on this fact.

2. PEOPLE HAVE A SHORT ATTENTION SPAN

As you know, I have been critical of Americans’ sense of history. Our young people know little regarding American history, world history, or even trade history, meaning they know little about the past regarding their company and the industry they serve. Consequently, we tend to re-invent things over and over again, not to mention allowing history to repeat itself.

Think about it, when it comes to current events, there are a lot of people who cannot remember what happened yesterday or last week, or on September 11, 2001, or December 7, 1941, or July 4, 1776. Such a mindset makes it easy for the news media to distort the facts.

3. PEOPLE ARE APATHETIC

The press is cognizant of the fact most Americans are apathetic towards politics and tend to roll with the punches rather than fight city hall. I have personally met many people over the years who honestly believe our voting system is corrupt and not worth their time to participate. This is sad.

Further, between their family and business obligations, people consider their time to be precious, so they prefer having people interpret the news for them. This results in a large class of “sheople,” people who are unable to think for themselves and follow the crowd. This type of people prefer to be told what to do as opposed to thinking for themselves.

These three principles are in the back of the mind of today’s news reporters and explains why they do not express any remorse for pulling the wool over the eyes of the American public. To them, it is not about journalistic integrity, it’s about taking an elitist position over the “brain-dead” public. To paraphrase Abraham Lincoln, the press honestly believes, “You can fool all the people all of the time.”

So, what can be done to combat this problem? I provided 10 Tips for doing so last year. Among them, I encourage people to report flagrant errors in news reporting to the FCC. This applies to news as presented on television, radio, the Internet, and by telephone. The more complaints, the more effective you will be.

Better yet, learn to seek the truth, pay attention, get active, and don’t accept their BS. You’ll drive the press crazy!

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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50 YEARS OF “PRIDE”

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 1, 2021

BRYCE ON BUSINESS

– Not bad for a small company that started in Cincinnati.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

My father, Milt Bryce, founded our company on April 1, 1971, in Cincinnati, Ohio, making today our 50th anniversary. He was always fond of saying that April 1st would be remembered as our joke on the computer industry. In reality, we had a great impact on the way people designed information systems and managed projects. Our main product was “PRIDE,” an acronym for “PRofitable Information by DEsign – through phased planning and control.” It was the first commercial methodology of its kind on the market, and helped foster a whole segment within the computer industry. Although it was a manual methodology at first, we added software which did some rather amazing things. By the way, in 1985 we moved the company to Tampa Bay, Florida.

Our first customer was the Marion Power Shovel Company in Marion, Ohio, closely followed by some rather large corporate accounts such as Tenneco, Babcock & Wilcox, and General Electric. From there, we spread oversees to places like Canada, Japan, Australia, Brazil, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, and throughout Europe. This afforded us the ability to travel and see quite a bit of the world. It has been quite a ride.

As for myself, I served the company in a variety of capacities, including marketing, customer service, product development, training, and consulting. This required considerable writing, including manuals, sales brochures, articles, technical papers, training scripts, and much more. From there I started to branch out to other subjects, such as politics, morality, and our changing world.

I learned several things about people through all of this; for example:

1. In the Information Technology (I.T.) world, the problems are all fundamentally the same regardless what country you visit. People still do not know how to define information requirements, design systems, or manage projects. Documentation is considered a waste of time, as they believe the real work resides in programming. Users are unhappy as they rightly believe nobody considers their point-of-view and developers claim the users don’t know what they want. The list can actually go on and on. Interestingly, everyone thinks their problems are unique. They aren’t.

2. People do not want to know the truth, and base their behavior on perceptions, not facts. I also found this to be so throughout the country when it comes to interpreting the news.

3. There is no sense of history in the I.T. industry, probably because schools teach nothing more than coding. Consequently, there is a tendency to reinvent the wheel year after year. This too, I see in other walks in life throughout the country, which explains why Americans do not understand our past. What a pitty.

4. Common sense is not common. People seem to prefer facade over substance. In the I.T. field, if you want to make money, just change the jargon and use cryptic concepts. People like to be mesmerized in this manner. I simply cannot believe the amount of snake oil sold in the I.T. industry, then again, this is probably true elsewhere.

5. People in I.T. are content doing small things, such as an “app.” The idea of designing and installing a massive system is beyond their comprehension, probably because they don’t know how to. This is why systems projects consistently come in late and over budget. As my father was fond of saying, “If we built bridges the same way we build systems in this country, this would be a nation run by ferryboats.”

6. Americans accept shoddy workmanship. I am always amazed when software companies ask their customers to “beta test” their products. To me, this is an admission they do not know how to test their products. Remarkably, people have been conned into believing this is an acceptable form of behavior and accept buggy programs.

7. In most I.T. departments I’ve been in, I have found either the management wants to do things right, and the troops rebel, or; the troops want to do things right, but management refuses to support them. I chuckle when I hear people say, “We do not have time to do things right.” Translation: “We have plenty of time to do things wrong.”

As I said, I have found these axioms to be universal.

Now, 50 years later, “PRIDE” is as relevant today as it was in 1971. Why? Three reasons:

1. We treated systems development as a science as opposed to an art form. We carefully defined our terminology, our concepts, and our techniques in plain English, without the usual gobbledygook of jargon.

2. It is derived from common-sense engineering/manufacturing concepts. It is based on the simple premise, “A system is a product that can be engineered and manufactured like any other product.” This is why we use such concepts as Blueprinting, Bill-of-Materials, Assembly Lines, Production Control, Inventory Control, and more.

3. It works! It has been used in just about every industry imaginable.

Fifty years is a long time, and I want to thank everyone who believed in us.

If you would like to know about the “PRIDE” Methodologies for Information Resource Management (IRM), you can find our book on Amazon (click HERE).

Or visit our web site at:
http://www.phmainstreet.com/mba/

Happy golden anniversary everyone! Who-da-thunk-it!

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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BEWARE OF THE H.R.1 BILL

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 30, 2021

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– It’s for the Democrats, not “For the People.”

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

House Resolution 1 (H.R.1), the “For the People” Act of 2021 was introduced on January 4, 2021 in the 117th Congress By Rep. John P. Sarbanes (D-MD-3), and recently passed to the Senate on March 11, 2021. To say this is a controversial bill would be an understatement as this represents major reforms to the way we vote; something many Americans are sensitive to following the 2020 presidential election.

I took time to read through the bill recently. Frankly, it is a kludge obviously written by attorneys. Thank God today’s Democrats never had a chance to write the Constitution as they would have made it more voluminous than “War and Peace.”

We already know our voting system is far from bulletproof but what is proposed here will weaken it further. Here is a handful of the problems I found with it:

1. The bill provides for voter registration over the Internet, allowing signatures in electronic form. As someone involved with the I.T. community for over 40 years, I see this as opening the floodgates to fraud. Maybe the authors of this bill are unfamiliar with the concept of Internet “hacking.” Not only will outsiders be allowed in, but this is a convenient way for the dead to come back to life and vote again.

2. The bill wants every eligible citizen to be registered to vote, whether they want to or not. Let’s assume the Democrats pass another bill providing blanket amnesty to illegal immigrants, thereby making them U.S. citizens. This would fill the coffers of votes for years to come.

3. In the bill, it states, “voter registration systems must be updated with 21st Century technologies and procedures to maintain their security.” This is laughable as computer technology is prone to security flaws. I would prefer 18th Century technologies instead, e.g., show up in person, prove you are a citizen, sign the rolls, etc.

4. It goes on to say, “The chief State election official of each State shall establish and operate a system of automatic registration for the registration of eligible individuals to vote for elections for Federal office in the State, in accordance with the provisions of this part.” This would result in 50 different interpretations for how this is done. Since the Federal government is pressing the issue, why don’t they provide a standardized system?

5. The bill promotes the ability for voters to vote by mail. Requesting a legitimate absentee ballot is one thing. Pushing massive voting by mail opens the doors to fraud as found in the 2020 election.

6. Under the bill, no form of identification is required to obtain an absentee ballot. This means anyone can ask for an absentee ballot, be they a citizen or illegal immigrant.

7. The bill proposes Election Day as a Public Holiday, representing yet another day for government employees to have another paid holiday.

8. Contrary to popular belief, the bill does not provide for 16 year olds to vote. However, they can be registered to vote at this time. This hints at the next step of allowing more uninformed voters to vote.

There is nothing in the bill about validating voter identity, verification of signatures, or checking rolls in a uniform manner. This is all about harvesting votes for the Democrats in an unscrupulous manner.

I have always considered the right to vote as a sacred honor, something that should be safeguarded, not given away. If this legislation is passed, it is yet another nail in the coffin to this great Republic. This bill is certainly not “For the People,” but rather for an autocratic form of government.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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REINVENTING THE WHEEL

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 25, 2021

BRYCE ON BUSINESS

– And why we should avoid doing so.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I’m a big believer or reusing things, particularly if I know something has already proven itself to be a viable solution. As a small example, I maintain a library of templates for such things as word processing and desktop publishing documents, web pages, and simple data base designs. I select a template, and then fine tune it until I get what I want. I find this saves me a lot of time as opposed to developing something from scratch. If I find something else useful along the way, I add it to my library. In the systems world, I have always advocated the sharing and reusing of information resources, such as data and processing components, which I often refer to as “building blocks” for developing systems. It’s just a smarter way of operating and, frankly, I don’t like to reinvent the wheel with every project I’m working on. Instead, I want to get the job done. If that means reusing something, so be it, regardless of its age; if it works, it works.

I’m not much of a proponent of “throwing the baby out with the bath water,” but I know a lot of people who are just the antithesis of this and are constantly reinventing the wheel. I don’t know why this is, but I suspect it probably has something to do with human ego. It’s kind of like someone saying, “Well, if I didn’t think of it, it can’t be any good and I’ll go and invent one myself.” We saw this for years when we sold our “PRIDE” methodology for systems design. We met several people who thought our methodology was nice, but thought they could do it better themselves and invested thousands of dollars trying to reinvent our wheel. Inevitably, such undertakings ended up as disasters and we sold them our product in the end. I always marveled at the amount of time and money these companies wasted in the process though; all because of ego.

Years ago General Motors took some heat for slipping a Pontiac engine into an Oldsmobile chassis. People thought they were getting gypped by getting a “cheap” engine. To me, I thought GM was brilliant. Here we had a company who designed products with interchangeable parts in mind. This allowed them to reduce inventory overhead, integrate their product lines, and still produce quality products less expensively. And I can tell you, there is nothing “cheap” about a Pontiac engine. Nonetheless, the public didn’t see it this way.

In the systems world, I think you would be surprised to see how much computer software is thrown out with each release of a product. Instead of reusing program code, a lot of companies simply reinvent the wheel with each release. I find this rather strange and a huge waste of money. Maybe it’s because people don’t know how to share and reuse component parts; either that or they simply don’t want to. Either way, the human tendency to avoid sharing and reusing anything, and reinventing the wheel each go around, leads to increased development costs, which, of course, is inflationary.

Another reason for not sharing is I believe we no longer have a sense of history anymore. We do not study what worked or what didn’t years ago, we are only interested in the present. Consequently, this leads people into reinventing a wheel that was invented some time ago.

There have been plenty of tools introduced over the years for standardizing and sharing components; everything from Bill of Material Processors (BOMP) in the manufacturing sector, to Repositories in the I.T. field. You can find such tools in just about every field of endeavor. The technology is certainly available to share and reuse components, but the desire and discipline to do so is not. I can tell you this, sharing and reusing things doesn’t happen by itself. It requires a concerted management effort to make it happen. However, if management is oblivious to the problem and doesn’t care about the amount of money they waste year after year, then I guess we will be “reinventing the wheel” for a long time to come.

First published: October 29, 2007

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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OUR SENSE OF PROFESSIONALISM

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 23, 2021

BRYCE ON BUSINESS

– It’s about substance versus facade.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

The word “professional” means a person is engaged in a specific activity as one’s main paid occupation. Related to this is “professionalism,” which is considered the quality of a person’s work as it applies to his vocation, e.g.; “You can depend on Jim, he is very professional in his job,” or; “Forget about Fred, he’s undependable, inconsistent; you know, very unprofessional.” I find it interesting the perspectives we have of ourselves as professionals. We all like to believe we are top-notch go-getters, but in reality is this really so? Young people desperately look for recognition from their managers as to the caliber of their work. Many genuinely believe they are highly professional in their work effort. The reality is they are far from it.

Some people believe their sense of professionalism is based on their taste in clothes and grooming, that if they project a certain image, people will develop a high opinion of them. Others believe it is a matter of being regarded as an authority on a specific subject. All of this is just facade. It’s not a matter of appearances or being an authority on a subject, but more a matter of your ability to deliver. It means you take your vocation seriously and are committed to success. From this perspective, it is more akin to “class” as applied to workmanship, such as inferior, average, good, and best. The professional thereby embraces best practices on a regular basis. Whereas some people do just enough to get by, the professional consistently produces superior results. Facade is simply not enough, it’s all about results. There is nothing more worthless than a person who knows how to do a job, but cannot deliver.

A true professional is considered resourceful, polished, knowledgeable, determined, and above all else, dependable to perform a task to a successful completion. You are the “go-to” person who produces superior results and, in the process, makes it look easy. Even if the task is difficult, you do not complain, you just make it happen. In other words, a true professional goes above and beyond the call of duty on a regular basis.

Instilling a sense of professionalism in an organization is difficult and requires coaching and mentoring. It includes developing a sense of craftsmanship, where methodologies and techniques are taught to the point it is understood; the benefits of performing tasks the right way, and the risks and penalties associated with performing tasks the wrong way. Our sense of professionalism is an inherent part of the corporate culture. The ultimate goal is to develop an esprit de corps whereby the company as a whole possesses the notion of zero tolerance for defects and attaining goals on-time and within budget

I wish it would be possible to certify professionalism, but you cannot, primarily because it is more of an attitude as opposed to a quantifiable technique. Projecting a professional image through fashion and vocabulary is nice and adds to your persona, but if you really want to be recognized as a professional, develop a reputation for delivering quality work products. Consider your approach to work; if you do just enough to get by, you are not there yet.

First published: October 19, 2015

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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EVOKING MEMORIES

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 18, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– How the sense of smell and taste can unleash vivid memories.

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Of all of our senses, smell and taste can trigger vivid emotional memories, even going so far as to making us feel like we are being transported back in time. Sight, sound, and touch are also useful, but smell and taste evokes powerful images for us. I have three personal examples that take me back in time to my youth.

The first involves the use of my taste buds. Lately I’ve taken to drinking fruit juices late at night. I have orange juice which is usually reserved for breakfast, but I also keep apple and grape juice in the fridge, along with a fruit punch, something I enjoyed in my youth. I usually opt for the diet lite versions of these products as I do not want the sugar, but they are still delicious and I like them particularly cold. When I drink them, the taste takes me back to the early 1960’s when I enjoyed such drinks in large tin cans which we would open with “church keys.” If I was lucky, I would drink from the can and distinctly remember the taste of the tin which added to its flavor. In particular, the grape drink reminds me of the cheap frozen popsicles we would enjoy during the summertime. Back then, we also poured the grape drink into a Tupperware popsicle maker and froze it. When I consume these drinks today, I am transported back for a few scant seconds where I enjoyed such heavenly drinks.

The second experience involves the use of smell. Sometimes, early in the morning, when I go to retrieve the newspaper in the driveway, the sun is just starting to peek up over the horizon and I can smell the dew on the lawn. It’s even better if the grass was freshly cut. It’s at this moment when I return to my elementary school in Connecticut where I used to ride my old reliable J.C. Higgins bicycle early to school so my friends and I could play a couple of innings of baseball before the first bell. Our parents could never understand why we wanted to go to school so early, but they chalked it up as a positive sign we liked school. Actually, it was all about baseball. As I smell the morning today, I vividly remember what route I would take to school, how fast I would go on my bike, ever mindful not to let my books and baseball mitt pop out of my front basket.

The third experience also involves smell. You have heard me talk about my fly-fishing excursions in the past, particularly in North Carolina. There is something inspirational about working a stream, something rather peaceful and therapeutic. In my case, when I enter a babbling brook, I am again transported back to the Connecticut of my youth, where we would fish in streams with simple rods and reels, using stringers to secure our catches, and how to clean the fish afterwards. Near to the streams would be fruit trees and we would enjoy apples and peaches. We spent a lot of time in the streams, fishing and swimming, and building forts along the way to stay out of our parents’ eyes. It was a glorious time.

Our sense of smell and taste are powerful and a link to our past. It reminds us of the kitchens of our grandparents, certain restaurants, and of events in the past, small or epochal. It’s evoked by such simple things as aftershave lotion, burning leaves, pipe tobacco, cooking with charcoal brickets, bacon, burned toast, etc., and suddenly we are transported back to our youth. Sadly, as strong as these memories are, they last but a few precious seconds, which is long enough to remind me how lucky I was to enjoy such experiences.

First published: October 16, 2015

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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WHEN HAVOC STRIKES

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 16, 2021

BRYCE ON BUSINESS

– What to do when someone loses their cool at the office.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this
segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request
.

Every now and then in business, we run into an uncomfortable situation where someone loses their cool and goes bananas. We primarily see this in situations involving the termination of an employee or when a worker blows up under pressure. They may not resort to armed violence, but such distractions can be disruptive and upset the harmony of the office, so we have to deal with it effectively and professionally.

We had a couple of situations like this over the years. The first that comes to mind was an employee who we terminated for poor performance. After being told his services were no longer wanted, he became visibly upset and refused to leave the building. The sheriff’s office was summoned who finally escorted him off the premises. After storing his personal items in his car, he stood out in front of our office and began yelling expletives at the company. Fortunately, the sheriff’s deputies removed him from the property. They asked if we wanted to press charges. We said, No, we just wanted him removed from the premises. Fortunately, this occurred at the close of business on a Friday, which is the right time to conduct terminations for this very purpose. You never know when a person is going to lose control.

I know of another company in the Tampa Bay area where an employee was terminated and instead of leaving, removed all of his clothes and sat at his desk, naturally making his co-workers uncomfortable as he couldn’t possibly be confused as a male model.

Our second incident involved a lawyer who was determined to serve our company with legal papers involving a tenant who had leased space in our building. Prior to his arrival, we received an unexpected tip the attorney was on his way. Learning of this, we locked the front door. Sure enough, the attorney came a few minutes later and tried to enter the building. Realizing the door was locked, he went into a verbal tirade outside demanding entrance. He was so obnoxious, we again called the sheriff’s office and had him arrested for trespassing. Interestingly, this marked the end of our legal hassles with our former tenant.

In both of our situations, it was tempting to go outside, confront the person and try to physically remove him from the property. Fortunately, cooler heads prevailed and we let local law enforcement handle the situation.

Such situations are uncommon, but as a co-worker you should always be cautious when a person goes into a rage. The best thing to do is avoid confrontation, do not engage the person orally or physically, thereby entangling yourself in the problem. Simply walk away and allow management and law enforcement to handle it. In larger corporations there are trained security people to escort them off the property. Smaller companies do not have such a luxury and must rely on local law enforcement.

In the situation of a hostile terminated employee, it is best not to allow him back into the business as he/she may very well want a physical confrontation, possibly
even involving gunfire. For the protection of the employees, it is best to keep the building under tight security until the person is off the property.

As to wacko attorneys, they may know the law, but it doesn’t mean they will adhere to it. It is wise to keep an eye on everyone coming and going to and from your facility, and keep the telephone number of law enforcement on your Speed Dial list. You never know when havoc will strike.

First published: October 2, 2015

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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WHEN IS IT TIME TO GO?

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 11, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– An ode to knowing when to depart this world.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.


You know it is time to go…
When the Earth has lost its charm, and no longer offers us joy or inspiration.
When we no longer find enjoyment in holidays, anniversaries or birthdays due to repetition.
When we can no longer find happiness in the simple pleasures of life.
When we can no longer contribute and have nothing more to offer.
When we recognize the party is over and cannot dance any longer.
When we are no longer the center of attention and our words fall on deaf ears.
When we can no longer socialize with others due to bitterness, anger or intolerance.
When we have lost too many times, forcing a decline in a will to win.
When we feel mankind has let us down one too many times.
When we have seen it all and done it all.
When there is an absence of love and understanding in the world.
When our bodies fail us once too often, be it mentally or physically.
However, if we spent our lives honorably and productively,
we will meet with God’s good graces who will be pleased with our efforts,
and reunite us with our loved ones in the great beyond.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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