THE BRYCE IS RIGHT!

Software for the finest computer – The Mind

TIM’S FIGHT WITH CANCER, PART III

Posted by Tim Bryce on January 19, 2022

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Turning the corner?

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

tbliver1In PART I, I discussed learning of my liver cancer and what went through my mind. In PART II, I described the first phase of my treatment. Now, in PART III, I want to discuss the second round which, hopefully, will be a turning point for me.

In mid-December, I began my Immunotherapy, which is a homeopathic-like approach to treating my tiny tumors. Basically, I am injected with two chemicals, Zirabev and Tecentriq, designed to trigger my immune system to fight microscopic tumors in my liver and the blood vessels feeding them. The cost for these drugs is mind-boggling, even after Medicare and my insurance supplement. Nonetheless, I haven’t much of an alternative, and I’m pushing forward with it.

Just prior to receiving my “drip” of the drugs, my doctor reviewed the possible side effects; e.g., skin rash, vomiting, diarrhea, and potential death. Of course, I had to sign forms to hold the doctors harmless should something go awry. Come to think of it, they would probably have more men willfully volunteer to take the drug if they said a possible side effect would be a five hour erection. I imagine there would be long lines if they had such a proviso. My doctor thought I had a point, after all, this is how Viagra got started as a heart medicine.

Afterwards, I went in for my first “drip” which lasted about an hour and a half. Thinking of the side effects, I was a little nervous at first. Fortunately, the “drip” ran its course and I didn’t feel the worse for it. I just didn’t like sitting in a chair for an hour and a half to take it. This will now become a monthly routine for me (I went in for my second “drip” on January 6th). This time I was smart enough to bring a book.

Just before Christmas, I went in for a Post-Op consult with my surgeon, who performed my first procedure on one of my large tumors. We scheduled January 13th (a Thursday), to go after the second and final large tumor. God willing, this will be my last. A CTscan in a few weeks will reveal if all of this is working.

The second procedure went off fine but I was a little disoriented from the medication and sore at the point of entrance (the groin area). The surgeon thought it went well. I spent the rest of the day in an easy chair falling in and out of sleep.

As an aside, in my first procedure, I was asked to lower my underwear a bit on the table for the doctor to access the groin area. Okay, no problem. On the second procedure, “Okay Mr. Bryce, take off the underwear.”

“Excuse me?” I asked. I was instructed to drop them off the table. Now I understand these are professional people who have seen a lot of things, but having to reveal your modesty to the four female nurses in the room was a first for me. Maybe I would have felt more comfortable with a brass pole in the room. Afterwards, my lady friends laughed at my modesty. “Oh Tim, you don’t know what we have to go through. What you are describing is nothing new.”

Maybe, but it was a first for me.

The next four days were miserable. Unlike the first procedure where I felt the pain of the incision on Day 3, and had pain medication to treat it, this time I experienced severe stomach cramps and bloating. The pain was such, that I only slept two hours the first night, thereby turning me into a zombie.

Realizing there was a blockage somewhere, I turned to good old Milk of Magnesia which eventually broke the log jam. Nonetheless, I still had no appetite and couldn’t eat for four days, thereby causing me to lose weight. I drank plenty of fluids, but eating was a No-No.

To make matters worse, I had a plumbing problem outside my house. It seems the main water line from the street to the house was ruptured by a tree root, causing me to lose water. As this was the weekend, the plumbers wouldn’t come out. You cannot imagine how uncomfortable it was to go out to the main valve, get down on your hands and knees, and turn the water on and off, particularly after an operation. Fortunately, the plumbers had it all corrected on Monday.

For four days, I flayed around my house in pain and needing sleep. Finally, sometime on Sunday night the pain abated. I woke up knowing something had changed and I felt much better, So much so, I got up early Monday morning, ran the laundry, took a shower, made coffee, and did a puzzle at the kitchen table. I wasn’t 100% yet, but I was definitely in the 90s. I lost weight during this process. I’m almost back to my fighting weight as in my high school football days. This was unbelievable to me.

Bottom-line: it’s good to be back amongst the living. I just hope that I do not have to go through this type of operation again.

As you know, I like to find a little humor in everything, but this is not funny. I feel like I’ve been beaten down, thereby killing my spirit. It’s kind of like getting a “noogie” everyday, and you tire of it rapidly. I don’t know if it is depression, but I find I am more irritable these days, ready to snap at anything, and time has no meaning anymore. I may not have the most severe case of cancer, but what I have weighs heavily on me. It is hard to be be optimistic and positive when this hangs over you, but I will persevere.

In talking this over with some senior friends of mine, it seems as we get older, our problems do not decrease but actually multiply, be it health related, home, politics, health, financial, family, etc. In football, this is known as “piling on” which is bound to unhinge anyone. It’s a matter of how much “piling on” we’re willing to accept before we snap. It tests all of us.

Sometime in early February, I am scheduled to get a CTscan which will reveal where I stand on my road to recovery. Hopefully the surgery is over, but I’ll still have my monthly “drips.” Thank God I have enough books to read.

Again, many thanks to all of you who extended best wishes during this process. You’re wonderful people.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

tim75x75Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2022 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 10 Comments »

2021 YEAR-END WRAP-UP

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 21, 2021

BRYCE ON BRYCE

– My most popular columns and audio segments this year.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

yearinreview1

This is my last column for the year as I prepare to enjoy the holidays and rest up for 2022. As has become customary, I’m using this opportunity to review my top essays from the past year.

As you know, I write on a variety of subjects, such as management, systems, technology, social issues, politics, and observations of our changing world. Sometimes my work is instructional and informative, other times it is controversial or humorous. I certainly hope it isn’t boring. By the number of subscribers I have, their comments, and the hits I have on my web sites, I do not believe this is the case.

This has been another fiery political year and, as such, my political columns did very well. Nonetheless, what follows is based on my “hits” on my web pages.

Interestingly, my readership has expanded beyond Florida. Currently, the following countries follow my work: USA, Ireland, Ecuador, Germany, France, Italy, Nigeria, Philippines, Thailand, Norway, United Kingdom. This is based on circulation.

This was a difficult year for me personally. I lost my mother in the Spring, and I discovered I had liver cancer in Autumn, something which I have written about recently. On the plus side, I am now the proud Papa of my first grandchild, who has become the apple of my eye. I have also met a wonderful woman who has been very supportive during these troubling times. As such, I count my blessings as opposed to problems. I must remember to write about romance in our senior years. It’s rather enchanting.

Writing has always been an important outlet for me. It helps me maintain my sanity. As my illustrator buddy said, “If they were to make you stop writing, and have me stop drawing, they might as well give us a Viking funeral here and now and put us out of our misery. It’s what we do and who we are.”

My top columns for the year include:

1. THE CATCH-22 IN NONPROFITS – Jan 05, 2021 – This really didn’t surprise me as it was published at the beginning of the new year as nonprofit organizations are just beginning a new fiscal year. It questions the competency of the leaders of such groups. This is why I wrote the book, “How to Run a Nonprofit: It doesn’t Require Rocket Science.”

2. TRYING TO KICK TRUMP UNDER THE BUS – Jan 19, 2021 – Number 2 and Number 3 discussed the “Stop the Steal” Protest in Washington, DC on January 6th. So their rankings didn’t surprise me. People want to know the truth about what happened that day, and so far they haven’t received it. It disturbs me greatly that protestors are still locked up without a speedy trial twelve months later. This is simply outrageous.

3. WHAT REALLY HAPPENED AT THE “STOP THE STEAL PROTEST” – Jan 9, 2021

4. TIM’S FIGHT WITH CANCER, PART I – Nov 16, 2021 – Number 4 and Number 5 are also closely related as I described my approach to conquering my liver cancer problem. It is my hope these writings can start a dialog among cancer patients and give the general public a glimpse into our thinking process.

5. TIM’S FIGHT WITH CANCER, PART II – Dec 07, 2021

6. REPUBLICAN CLUBS FALTER – May 27, 2021 – This grabbed the attention of Republicans where I essentially made the observation, “The emperor has no clothes.” Something that didn’t sit well with the GOP hierarchy. However, the grass roots people loved it as I spoke on their behalf.

7. FLORIDA PARENTS’ BILL OF RIGHTS – Aug 24, 2021 – this was a new bill within the State of Florida. Other states have also tried this. It ultimately is a reminder that parents should have more control over their children’s educational rights, as opposed to local government. This has spurred attendance at local School Board meetings.

8. “INHERITANCE AFTERMATH” – May 6, 2021 – Following the loss of my Mother, I prepared a punch list of items to consider when shutting down an estate. I hope a lot of people will heed my advice.

9. REPUBLICAN VALUES – June 15, 2021 – I discussed the core values of Republicans, something the general public simply doesn’t understand.

10. FOR THE LOVE OF WHITE CASTLES – May 4, 2021 – In early May, White Castle Restaurants finally opened a store in the Orlando area. This was enthusiastically greeted by displaced Yankees now living in Florida. Here I discussed what it means to them.

I also provide an audio version of most of my columns for those people on the go, courtesy of YouTube. I would like to believe people listen to me at the gym or beach, but more realistically, people tend to tune in while they are traveling or at work. Interestingly, the popularity of my audio segments is not the same as my written columns.

AUDIO SEGMENTS ON YOUTUBE

1-REMOVING PALMETTO PALMS – Thu, June 10, 2021 – This was far and away my post popular audio segment, which surprised me as I was describing only the removal of Palmetto Palms on my property. I guess a lot of people hate them as much as I do.

2-WHY IS EVERYONE HIRING? – Tue, June 8, 2021 – During the summer, I spotted several “Hiring!” signs. People would rather take government stimulus money as opposed to working. How can they look at themselves in the mirror?

3-“HOW TO BECOME A TYRANT” – MUST SEE TV – Tue, July 20, 2021 – This was based on a mini-series on Netflix which described the characteristics of Dictators over the years. A lot of what was described can be seen today in the political world.

4-BIDEN’S FIRST 100 DAYS – Thu, Jan 21, 2021 – my predictions of what Joe Biden would implement in the first 100 days of his administration.

5-WHO ARE THE DOMESTIC TERRORISTS? – Tue, Feb 9, 2021 – Well, according to Congress, it’s not Antifa of BLM, but parents voicing their displeasure at school board meetings.

6-FACE-MASKS ARE HERE TO STAY – Tue, Mar 2, 2021 – Regretfully so.

7-THE JIM CROW SHTICK – Tue, Apr 20, 2021 – I produced this as a means to educate people about Jim Crow laws. I’m amazed how many people do not understand their origin.

8-WHY TRUMP IS STILL A FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH – Thu, Mar 4, 2021 – It is now rather obvious that our 45th President is still the figure-head of the Republican Party.

9-THEY ARE KILLING THE GAME – Tue, Apr 27, 2021 – This was an unusual piece where I discussed how MLB is changing the game of baseball through rule changes.

10-IS JOE GOING TO MAKE IT? – Thu, July 29, 2021 – I discussed the president’s mental acuity, something people are finally questioning.

I will be on sabbatical for awhile until I am ready to get back in the saddle for the new year. Until then, Merry Christmas to all, and to all, Good Night!

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

tim75x75Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

THE MEANING OF CHRISTMAS

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 14, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– It is certainly not about the commercialization of the holiday, or Santa.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

woolcapNOTE: I originally wrote this piece back in 2013. I was pleased with its reception. I think it makes an important point about Christmas. I also believe it would make a great TV show for the season. Let me know what you think. – TB

He arose in the morning groggy and disoriented. He didn’t know where he was or recognized the surroundings. It was a small room, very neat and clean, with a sofa, desk, and big bed. Anyone would recognize it as a hotel with all of the amenities. He had no memory of how he had gotten there. Sunlight peeked between the curtains. The television was playing a Christmas gala, complete with classic holiday music. The entertainment was broken up by the occasional commercial where announcers were promoting everything from toys to clothes, jewels, and automobiles. Each announcer admonished viewers to hurry as there was just one day until Christmas.

“Christmas? Where am I, where have I been?”

He slowly stood up and went over to the window and opened the curtains to look outside where the grass and roads were covered with a thin layer of snow. It was cold, but not frigid. People could be seen walking on the streets carrying packages, cars moved quickly along a boulevard, and pine trees were adorned with tinsel, bulbs and lights. He didn’t recognize any of it which confused matters further.

He washed himself in the bathroom and then spotted some clothes neatly folded on the sofa, complete with shoes and socks. The clothes fit remarkably well. The shoes, which were actually a set of leather and rubber boots, also fit comfortably. He combed his hair before putting on the jacket and wool cap hanging on the chair at the desk. He unlocked the door and stepped outside into the cold air and surveyed the area around the hotel. Nothing looked familiar; did Europe look like this?

A woman dressed in a heavy black coat passed by him and greeted him good morning.

It was English, but the accent wasn’t recognizable. He replied, “Good morning,” to the woman who hurried away before any other questions could be asked.

He watched her hurry down the street heading towards a large building where several cars were already parked. A sign in front read, “Springdale Town Mall.” He was curious and thought people at the building might hold some answers. So He followed the woman to the mall, crossing the street carefully as it was busy with vehicles. The traffic lights seemed strange to Him, as well as the lines on the street, along with the the commotion of the cars and their horns. As He approached the entrance to the mall, He could hear the sounds of Christmas music coming from the mall’s PA system in the parking lot. In between songs, announcers touted their products and admonished shoppers there was just one more day until Christmas. He really didn’t grasp what was going on.

He entered the mall which was the largest structure He had ever seen. Inside was a cavernous multitude of lights, more music, and thousands of people circulating. There seemed to

be hundreds of shops offering a variety of wares; toys, cutlery, sporting goods, jewelry, and many other goods. Virtually all had signs in their windows promoting sales and reminding shoppers there was now less than a day to Christmas. He paused by an electronic store where many television sets were displaying Christmas shows. The shows were mesmerizing and He became somewhat intoxicated by the sights and sounds emanating from the televisions.

He wandered the mall examining the various stores carefully. Each was decorated in red and green colors, with wreaths, and the smell of pine and sweet candy hung in the air. Electric lights, snowmen, and miniature railroads offered animation. Gifts were wrapped in a special type of green and red paper and ribbons. All in all, it was a feeding frenzy of shopping. He wondered what the purpose of all this activity. There were several signs mentioning “Christmas,” but He didn’t make the connection.

There was the smell of food in the air which caused His stomach to growl in hunger. He passed the mall’s Food Court which featured several restaurants offering a variety of strange looking ethnic foods. He watched cooks prepare Japanese sushi and Chinese cuisine, none of which He recognized as something edible. The Mexican restaurant smelled of spicy hot peppers. The only restaurants which somehow resembled familiar food was the Italian restaurant, although He balked at pizza, and the Greek restaurant featuring gyros and souvlakis, both offered on pita bread.

He asked the clerk for a gyro as it appeared to be made of lamb. The young clerk prepared the meal accordingly, complete with French Fries and a cola drink.

“That will be $5 for the gyro special,” she said.

He looked perplexed by her request but quickly figured she was asking for money of which He had none. He tapped his trousers with his hand and heard the distinct click of metal. He reached inside his pocket where He retrieved some coins valued at $2 each. “Will you take these?” He asked.

The clerk took three of them and presented him with a $1 bill saying, “Here is your change. Thank you. Next!…”

He walked away from the restaurant with his tray and found an empty table to sit and eat. He studied the $1 bill carefully. He had never seen paper money before and didn’t recognize Washington’s portrait. He ate the gyro hungrily. He enjoyed the taste of cooked lamb as well as the pita bread. The French Fries seemed peculiar to him though. He picked one up and inspected it carefully. Nearby at other tables, people were eating them. He then broke one in half and tasted it, and it was good, even though He didn’t know what it was. “A French Fry? Hmm…,” and He ate the rest. He examined the cola drink suspiciously. He took a sip and found the taste medicinal in nature, and the bubbles tickled His nose. Spotting a nearby water fountain, He emptied the cola down its drain and replaced it with water which tasted remarkably clean to Him.

He saw others dumping the trash from their trays into the garbage and followed suit. The meal had served its purpose and He felt refreshed. He then returned to wandering around the mall. The music and hubbub was beginning to give Him a small headache.

It was mid afternoon when He came to the center of the mall where he sat at a bench on the second floor. He marveled at the immensity of the mall and as He looked down to the bottom floor He discovered a long line of children waiting for someone named “Santa Claus.” Dozens of children waited patiently to sit with a fat man dressed in a red and white costume. He assumed the man was elderly as he wore a white beard with matching color hair.

An elderly woman came and sat on the bench to rest her feet. She was loaded with several packages and looked tired from her trek around the mall.

“Excuse me, but who is that man down there?” He innocently asked the woman.

She looked down to see the object of His attention.

“Are you kidding me?” she said, “It’s Santa Claus and his elves talking to the kids of course.”

He said, “I’m sorry, I am not from around here. What is a Santa Claus?”

She looked at him inquisitively but gave him the benefit of doubt. “He is actually called by many names, St. Nicholas, Kris Kringle, and many others around the world. He is considered the patron saint of Christmas and is best known for delivering presents to children on Christmas.”

“Christmas, there is that name again,” He thought.

He watched the children one-by-one visit with the old gentleman. Some appeared timid and scared, others enjoyed a good conversation with the man, others were loud and animated, demanding certain presents on Christmas Day. It was all rather unclear as to the purpose of the meeting with Santa other than it was an outlet to promote the purchase of more gifts. He was amazed by the length of the never-ending line and requests for more gifts.

The greed and opulence of the season was too much for him to stomach any longer. He took his leave of the mall wanting to head back to the safety of the hotel room. Unfortunately, He became a bit disoriented and couldn’t find the same door from which He entered, and exited on the opposite end of the mall where nothing looked familiar.

He had spent considerable time at the mall and it was now late afternoon with long shadows and the sun beginning to set. All He could see were rows of neat wooden homes adjacent to the mall. He was unfamiliar with the architecture and wanted to take a closer look. He entered a subdivision and was amazed how orderly the houses were aligned and well maintained.

As the sun set, decorative lights were switched on and lit up the houses and the adjacent trees and shrubbery. Various statues of snowmen, Santa Claus, and angels were also lit and music could be heard in the air. There also seemed to be reindeer everywhere; on top of houses, pulling sleighs, or metalic statues on front lawns, some were animated appearing to be grazing. In was very reminiscent of the storefronts in the mall.

He walked several blocks in amazement as the houses turned darkness into light. Other people also walked the neighborhood in order to see the decorations. Cars began to enter the streets where they moved slowly so parents and children could admire the decorations. As pleasant as this all ways, He was at a loss as to what it all meant.

As He exited the neighborhood, He was presented with two large structures, one with a crucifix atop it, and another with the Star of David. He was appalled by the crucifix and began to wonder if people still practiced the tortuous custom. The large cross stopped Him in his tracks and He began to tremble. He noticed the other structure bore the Shield of David, a symbol He was familiar with through Judaism.

It was nighttime now and both buildings were active with people, the Temple celebrating a Bar Mitzvah, and the Church preparing to celebrate Christmas mass. Being more familiar with the Shield of David, He approached the Temple, where people were exiting for the evening. Still inside was the rabbi who was bidding goodnight to the attendees. He worked his way to the rabbi, a middle aged man who appeared to be of good nature.

He said, “Rabbi, I am a stranger to this area. As I have walked around the village I notice there is a fascination with ‘Christmas’ here. I would like to know more.”

The Rabbi smiled and said, “Well stranger, you are actually in a good place to learn. I would like to sit down and tell you more, but the hour is late and I have another appointment. However, I recommend you visit the church next door where they are getting ready to celebrate Christmas. I am confident they will tell you the full story tonight.”

He took his leave of the rabbi, who locked the Temple after He exited. Many people were entering the house of the crucifix, men, women and children. As it appeared to be safe, He overcame his timidity and reluctantly approached the church. At the door, He was warmly welcomed by greeters. The inside appeared to be a place for religious retreats, with several rows of pews, and an altar at the front.

As the service began, the congregation rose to its feet and began to sing, accompanied by an organ. He was startled by this, but found the music strangely comforting. He looked about and saw everyone singing in unison, along with a choir which sang as one. The pomp and circumstance was impressive. He looked on in horror as a small boy walked slowly down the center aisle carrying another crucifix with an effigy of a person nailed to it. The boy proudly presented the cross at the front of the congregation before placing it in a stand. He was bewildered by the display and was prepared to turn and run, but something inside him told him to stand his ground. After the entrance of the clergy, the music stopped and everyone returned to their seats.

The minister welcomed everyone to the evening’s Christmas celebration. This was followed by a sweet celebration enacted by the children of the church who were dressed in colorful costumes. The minister narrated the story of the birth of Christ and the children acted out the story. He listened intently. He heard the names of Joseph and Mary, which were well known to him, as well as a place called Galilee. He listened to their story of the birth of their savior. Aside from the shiny costumes and some obvious literary liberties, it was a story He knew well, and his spirits perked up noticeably. He was no longer afraid but felt quite at home.

After the play, the minister asked all first time visitors to rise and be recognized. One-by-one he welcomed each visitor, asking who they were and where they were from. The minister finally asked the stranger to introduce himself.

“I am known as Jesus of Nazareth,” He said.

The minister thought He was mocking the congregation and quickly confronted the stranger. Anger was in the minister’s eyes but before he could utter a harsh word, He said, “I am a stranger to this area,” and raised his hand in peace to shake the minister’s.

It was only then the minister saw the scars from the crucifixion. There was something in the stranger’s demeanor and eyes that made him realize he was now in the presence of something special. The minister froze until He placed his hands on him in comfort. The minister smiled and knelt to his knees. The congregation didn’t quite comprehend the situation, but followed the minister’s lead and knelt.

He said, “Please rise, you are all my children. I’m not sure why I was sent here but I believe it has something to do with the meaning of Christmas, something I didn’t quite understand until I witnessed your pageant.”

“Yes, this is your birthday, your eminence,” the minister replied.

“I have been among you this day and have witnessed many things, most of which I do not understand, particularly the greed of this day. I hope they are not using this day to celebrate such a weakness.”

The minister was embarrassed, “I am afraid a lot of people have forgotten its purpose. It is not about shopping, it’s about You.”

“In my time, we celebrated birthdays by the breaking of the bread. We didn’t have opulent presents. Instead, we offered our love, fellowship, and trust to others. If this is truly my Birthday, let us celebrate likewise,” and loafs of bread appeared in His hands.

Jesus moved to the altar and broke the bread into small pieces for everyone to consume. The minister assisted by pouring wine.

“Here, eat and drink. Do this for the remembrance of Me. My message is simple: I love you unconditionally. You may not believe in me, but have confidence that I love you. Do not dwell in hate. Practice love and do unto others as you would have others do unto you. It’s really not that difficult, is it?.”

As the last morsel of bread was consumed and wine drunk, He turned and disappeared into the ether with the exclamation, “Remember!”

First published: December 23, 2013

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

tim75x75Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 4 Comments »

TIM’S FIGHT WITH CANCER, PART II

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 7, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– The treatment.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

tbliver1In PART I, I described how I discovered cancer in my liver; the emotions I felt and my approach to the problem. Here, in PART II, I describe the beginning of my therapy.

Previously, I discussed how my medical team recommended the treatment I was to pursue. Chemotherapy and radiation was not used because the cancer remained localized in the liver and had not spread to other parts of my body. Consequently, they were to go in and surgically cutoff the blood vessels to my two large tumors, thereby killing them. This was to be done in two separate procedures.

On November 15th I had a consult with my surgeon, a doctor who performed two biopsies on me earlier in the year, and someone I trusted. He told me the pros and cons pertaining to this approach, “As to cons Tim, I want you to understand this is not a cure, but it will improve your quality of life and lengthen your time on this planet. However, you will likely have to monitor your condition for the remainder of your life and take action if it resurfaces.”

I responded by saying I would just like to be rid of the tumors and see what happens.

I’ve discovered medical care is all about trust. I have confidence in my medical team, but their administrative support staff leaves a lot to be desired. You get the uneasy feeling the left hand quite often doesn’t know what the right hand is doing. This is particularly true when you have multiple parties involved. As for me, this includes my Oncologist, my Surgeon, my Primary Care Physician, and another surgeon from Tampa General Hospital. Scheduling and communications between all parties were at times confusing. I do not blame the physicians, but I have some serious doubts about their administrative processing. As I’ve mentioned before, I also grow weary of answering the same medical questions over and over again at time of check-in. Oy!

I also discovered Cancer is an equal opportunity disease. It doesn’t care about your station in life. In my many trips to visit doctors and test facilities, I think I’ve met people from all stratas of society. This leads me to believe you cannot buy yourself an easy out in terms of finding a cure. Consequently, cancer patients are on a constant quest for any cure that might help them, either legitimate or quackery.

Frankly, I am baffled why Cancer is proliferating and not abating. The waiting rooms at cancer centers are full. Is it because of the timing of the baby boomers or an insatiable pharmaceutical industry? Perhaps both, but I thought we would have made more progress by now.

On November 30th, shortly after Thanksgiving, I met with my Oncologist to discuss the road ahead. The surgery was scheduled for later in the week, December 2nd, to tackle my first big tumor. We would then perform tests to see if this was working properly and, if so, address my second tumor in early January.

My Oncologist wanted to go beyond this. As you may remember, I also have smaller tumors in my liver, and they are microscopic in size. In discussing my situation with his colleagues, he recommended Immunotherapy, which is a homeopathic-like approach to treating my tiny tumors. Two expensive doses of medicine would be injected intravenously to trigger my immune system to kick in and fight the microscopic tumors and the blood vessels feeding them. It sounded like a good idea to me as I could not withstand major surgery to remove the tumors. On December 16th, I will be administered the two drugs: Zirabev and Tecentriq. The cost for the one treatment is a whopping $19,509, but after Medicare and my supplement, I’ll have to pay $3,936.80. This will fulfill my deductible and the price should go down further for ensuing treatments. Nonetheless, I was noticeably startled by the costs.

On December 1st, the day before my surgery, I posted on Facebook, “Tomorrow morning is Round One with my fight with the Devil. I’m suited up and ready. Put me in Coach…”

I wanted to let my friends know I was mentally prepared for the operation. I wanted to see what kind of “Iron Man” I really was. I earned this title my senior year when I was playing football at Wyoming High School (Cincinnati). The award was given to the person who spent the most time on the field. As I was on every team, except the kickoff team, I won the award handily. I was proud of this, and it left an impression on me; it meant, if you wanted to get something done, you went through Bryce. This followed me through my professional career as I learned the importance of being resourceful and helping others, thereby making yourself invaluable. Now it was time to see if the “Iron Man” moniker would give me the strength to help conquer my Cancer.

The day before the operation, I occupied myself by running errands and making sure I had food in the fridge. I picked up a prescription of oxycodone for my pain medication, of which I never tried before, but my friends warned me it was strong stuff. I even washed my car, and put salt in my water softener. I did all of this to stay distracted from tomorrow’s ordeal. I was confident, but for some reason my stomach was upset, probably due to nerves. I took a pill to settle it down.

Late in the afternoon, I thought about God, and asked if I had led a good life. I recognize people do not always like what I have to say, both personally and professionally, but I always sought to honestly tell the truth, warts and all. I know a lot of people have trouble with this, thereby causing me to butt heads, but I couldn’t sleep with myself if I didn’t seek the truth. I miss my father with whom we held many animated arguments; not vicious, but cerebral where we hammered out a lot of problems for our product and customers. I miss his mental gymnastics greatly. I closed with a prayer.

The day of surgery, I woke early, got on the computer and checked my e-mails. I then showered and prepared myself according to the instructions given me by the surgeon’s staff. My brother came and drove me to the appointment and picked me up later. By 7:00am I was prepared both administratively and personally. At 8:00am I was the first one scheduled for surgery. They gave me my “martini” and I slipped off into La-La Land. I don’t know how long I was out, but I suspect it was an hour long procedure. I woke just as they were moving me out of surgery and back to my room where I would stay for the next two hours where the staff would observe me. Remarkably, I felt no pain whatsoever. The surgeon told me the procedure was very successful and went smoothly. One day later, I still felt no pain. “So much for the pain medication,” I thought.

Later in the day, I wrote on Social Media, “Just got home from surgery. First procedure was successful. Still dopey from the meds. Resting at home under new meds. First thing I ate after fasting was four White Castles, thereby completing the cleansing process.”

Basically, I wanted to let my friends know how I was progressing and that I still possessed a sense of humor.

Two days after the surgery, the pain finally kicked in, strongly I might add. I finally reached for the oxycodone which did its job rather well. I also felt lethargic and disoriented, so I settled into an easy chair for most of the day. The next day was a little better, but I still felt shots of pain whenever I coughed. Laughing was equally painful.

I guess the lesson for this chapter is realizing the mental gymnastics involved in planning for a cancer operation or any major surgery for that matter. You go in hoping for the best, but prepared for the worst. This becomes rather taxing and wears you down. I’m not beaten yet, but I haven’t won either. The mental anguish wears heavily on you, at least it did for me, and grinds down your alertness and sense of humor.

Finally, I was very moved by the show of support over the last couple of days by well wishers. It was simply amazing and just plain good Ju-Ju! I literally heard from hundreds of people from around the world who offered kind thoughts and prayers. As I learned a long time ago, Prayers Work!

Next up: follow-up reviews of the procedure, a CTscan, and I begin the special meds on December 16th of which I am concerned about the side-effects. After this, the surgeon will go after Tumor #2 in early January and hopefully this will all start to abate. Then, of course, there are the Christmas holidays which normally means little to me due to the commercialization of the holidays and the loss of my wife around this time two years ago.

Many thanks to my family and inner circle of friends for your assistance during this time of difficulty, you were invaluable. A special thanks to “L.D.” for nursing me back to health.

I will write Part III of this log sometime in January as I learn more.

In the meantime, I will persevere!

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

tim75x75Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 12 Comments »

THE CHARM OF A RAINY DAY

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 1, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– The idea is to relax, right?

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

NOTE: The following is an excerpt from my book, “Tim’s Senior Moments,” a great gift idea for parents this holiday season.

rainyRecently, we were supposed to have a rainy day on a Saturday here in Tampa Bay. Not just a little rain, but according to forecasters, a real soaker with thunderstorms lasting all day. Such precipitation is unusual for Florida. Sure, we have our share of hurricanes, but not your basic rainy day as experienced by northerners. Usually, it rains for about an hour before clearing up and the sun shines though.

I was really looking forward to the day as I wanted to catch up on some sleep and do some minor odds and ends around the house, maybe even read a book if I was lucky. As a child growing up in the north, I relished such days as we stayed inside and played cards or held marathon Monopoly sessions.

I heard thunder in the distance before sunrise, causing me to snuggle down further into bed instead of getting up, retrieving the newspaper, and having breakfast. The bacon and eggs could wait, my sleep couldn’t. I had found the perfect spot and burrowed in deeper. An hour went by, then two; the thunder dissipated in the distance, but still no rain. So far, the weather forecasters were batting zero.

I slowly got up, and went for the paper. Outside, it was quiet with no sign of moisture. In fact, it looked like it was going to be a nice day. After breakfast, I performed a little cleanup and prepared myself for the day as it seemed obvious this was going to be a regular day. So much for my sleep and relaxation.

I then went to the supermarket and did the grocery shopping for the week. It’s kind of nice going to the store early in the morning before the other patrons descend on it like a pack of locust. The shelves were amply stocked and few people were clogging the aisles. I finished the shopping in no time at all. Still, there was no sign of precipitation.

After dropping off the groceries at home, I decided to fill the car with gas and have it washed, usually a sure way to entice the rain gods. Again, nothing happened.

I returned home and seeing overcast but no menacing clouds, I decided to mow the lawn, another good way to attract rain, kind of like performing a rain dance. Alas, nothing happened. After edging, trimming, mowing and blowing, I was finally done and ready to relax. However, I first needed a shower as I had become sweaty and dirty.

So, what should I do for the remainder of the day? Go shoot some trap? Perhaps throw a fishing line off a pier or just go down to the beach. Or maybe hit a bucket of golf balls? I figured I would get in my newly cleaned car and just go and see where it took me. But just as the garage door opened…BOOM! The skies opened up and we were deluged with rain. Needless to say, I was disappointed.

So, what to do? I was clean, my chores were done and I was ready to have some fun, but now what? Before you could say, “Hurricane Elena,” I found myself in bed under the covers, which is where I wanted to be seven hours earlier.

I thought, “ah, finally!” And I again snuggled down for a much deserved nap. But just before I lost consciousness, I heard the rain stop, sunshine began to come through the window, and the birds began to chirp again outside. It was then that I made a solemn oath never to listen to weather forecasters again. They lie.

First published: May 6, 2016

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

tim75x75Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016, 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

THANKSGIVING & THE LOVES OF OUR LIVES

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 23, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Celebrating the many loves in our lives.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

thanks2Thanksgiving is a favorite of mine and I have written about it on numerous occasions (see below). It’s more than just the food, it’s about being around friends and family. It’s the telling of a joke or story, a fond memory, and a glass of cheer. All of this reflects on the love we have for those who surround us, to wit –

THE LOVES OF OUR LIVES

Throughout our lives we touch a lot of people.

Before you are born, you are the twinkle in your father’s eye.

When you are born, you warm your grandmothers’ hearts.

When you are a toddler, you are the apple of your mother’s eye.

When you are in grade school, you become the buddy of your grandfathers.

You form bonds with family and friends that often lasts a lifetime.

When you play well in a game, you are celebrated by your teammates.

As you enter your clumsy teenage years, you are the scourge of your parents,

But when you graduate from school, you are their pride.

As a young adult, you finally meet the love of your life.

When you marry, your mother is delighted but your father shed’s a tear.

When you have children of your own, your friends and family rejoice.

When you succeed at work, you are the toast of your business associates.

As you retire, you surround yourself with old friends and reminisce.

And when you are gone, you reside in the recesses of our loved ones’ memories, all of whom you have touched.

Each person touches many lives, not only receiving love but passing it on to others as well.

And when we gather around the Thanksgiving table, let us give thanks for the blessings we have and the love we share.

Happy Thanksgiving.

My other columns on Thanksgiving:

* Tim’s 2017 Thanksgiving Grace (Huffington Post, 11/22/2017)

* How not to cook a Thanksgiving Dinner (11/23/2016)

* A Thanksgiving Moment (11/27/2013)

* What are we giving Thanks to? (11/20/2012)

First published: November 26, 2019

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

tim75x75Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

TIM’S FIGHT WITH CANCER, PART I

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 16, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– A personal look at what goes on during such a fight.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

tbliver1I’ve got cancer; Stage 2 liver cancer to be precise. I’ve been sitting on this piece of news for some time now and have only shared it with family and close personal friends as I didn’t want to be awash in sympathy cards and notes through social media; I still don’t want to hear it. I’m going to beat this devil, which is probably what every person diagnosed with some form of cancer says, but I think I have a good medical team in place and I am optimistic. I am therefore writing this to let people know what it is like to go through this process, what goes through a patient’s head, and hopefully help someone along the way.

Years ago, I wrote a column titled, “Cancer, the Big Kahuna” of diseases which described the various forms of the disease. Since then, I have lost a lot of friends to the many forms of it, e.g., pancreatic, lung, brain, and more. Each had a unique experience in their battle with it. I realize there is no super-cure for cancer, but we have still made considerable progress during my lifetime. As of this writing, I am in my 67th year on this planet and there is still a lot I want to do with my life, but I am now mindful I have a problem and will watch the clock carefully.

What triggered all this was a routine review of my blood by my primary care physician who informed me my platelet count was falling. According to the National Cancer Institute, “a platelet is a tiny, disc-shaped piece of cell that is found in the blood and spleen. Platelets are pieces of very large cells in the bone marrow called megakaryocytes. They help form blood clots to slow or stop bleeding and to help wounds heal. Having too many or too few platelets or having platelets that don’t work as they should can cause problems. Checking the number of platelets in the blood may help diagnose certain diseases or conditions.”

To check on this, I was turned over to a specialist who ordered a biopsy of my bone marrow as produced from my hip. As it turned out, I was producing a lot of good blood, but something was eating up the platelets. This resulted in a series of tests, including an MRI, CTscan, and another biopsy on my liver. After all this, I was called in to speak to the doctor who broke “the news” to me. He was all business and “matter-of-fact” in his demeanor, and I appreciated his brutal honesty and professionalism, even though this wasn’t the news I hoped to hear. I learned a long time ago in business of the necessity of not sugar-coating anything of a serious nature. Political correctness be damned.

As I drove home, “the news” started to sink in and I found myself in a Twilight Zone or fog, wondering how the hell I got cancer. It was a very odd feeling, particularly since I feel pretty healthy right now.

There was no real history of cancer in my family, other than my maternal grandmother who fought and lost to cervical cancer, but neither my mother or father had any trace of the disease. I was asked if I had any exposure to Hepatitis C or a dirty needle; none to my knowledge. I was also asked if I used excessive alcohol; I said “No” as I consider myself a social drinker. The only other possibility was that I had become rather heavy years ago which may have created a “fatty liver” which would lead to cirrhosis of the liver, and cancer. For those of you who remember, I threw off considerable weight some time ago. I also stopped drinking a few weeks ago after hearing “the news,” which is helping me to lose weight.

Another thing I thought about while traveling home was Mickey Mantle, the legendary New York Yankee slugger who I revered as a kid. In 1995 he succumbed to an aggressive case of liver cancer. The doctors tried to give him a donor liver to solve the problem, but this didn’t occur. This too passed through my mind. Something else, for five years I was the primary caregiver for both my wife and mother who lost their battles to COPD. I find it rather ironic that I am now the patient and not the caregiver, something I never thought would happen.

The first thing I did when I got home was to “circle the wagons.” I reviewed the results with my former primary care physician who retired a couple of years ago and lives nearby. He read through the documentation carefully and clarified a few things my doctor had mentioned to me. I also reviewed it with a friend who is a retired Oncologist. He too confirmed the findings of my Doctor. I consider myself to be fortunate to have two friends from the medical community who could coach me accordingly.

As mentioned, I notified family and friends about my condition which surprised just about everyone. I asked them to keep this quiet while I tried to sort out what to do. One was a breast cancer survivor who fought her battle just a couple of years ago, so she was particularly sympathetic with my plight. My immediate family was very supportive, but I am determined not to let this have an adverse effect on their lives.

As some of you may know, I lost my wife almost two years ago. Recently though, a lady friend has entered my life who also fought and beat breast cancer about five years ago. She has been a tower of strength to lean on and I appreciate her candor on the subject. This group represents my safety net which I think is natural for humans to create as we want as much advice as possible

One of the first tasks I performed after learning of “the news” was to have my will and related estate paperwork updated. I had not reviewed the documents since we left Cincinnati in 1985. As good as it was, it still needed some updating which a local attorney handled promptly. He also helped me prepare a Power of Attorney, and a living will. This is something I should have been more mindful of, but finally put it to bed.

Following the initial shock, I then underwent a battery of tests and visited specialists who confirmed my diagnosis and discussed various treatments. The tests revealed the tumors were localized in the liver and not spreading. I also discovered how liver cancer is treated is not quite the same as with other forms of the disease. For example, chemotherapy is not applicable in this case. A liver transplant is one option, but I was told mine should be handled differently. In addition, surgery could be used to cut out the tumors and the liver can grow back. Unfortunately, in my situation, there would be a lot to cut out and my liver would never recover. The final treatment, and the one I will be undergoing, is to go in with vascular surgery and cut the blood vessels in the liver feeding the tumors, thereby killing them. So, the lesson learned here was: keep an open mind and consider all options. My doctor friends, as mentioned earlier, agreed this was the right road for me to take.

It is unlikely the surgeon would get 100% of everything on the first pass, so I might have to undergo the same treatment a second (or third) time until it has all been eradicated.

So, how do I feel about all this prior to embarking on my therapy? At first I was a bit in shock. As I said, physically I feel fine right now which caused me to disbelieve I have a problem. Then you ask yourself, “Why me?” Once you get past this stage you start focusing on the problem with a clearer head. More than anything, I appreciate the professionalism of my medical team. This has given me a sense of confidence and optimism.

Am I scared? I suppose I should be, but I have lived a good life, have seen a lot of the world, met a lot of people, and I’m proud of my family. Instead of being scared though, I have been preparing myself mentally as if I was going into a football game much like when I was a young man. I am not so much concerned facing a formidable opponent and getting hurt, but I am now focused on beating my enemy on his home turf. I realize pain will be part of the game, but I believe I can take it. Frankly, I like my odds of winning.

One last thing I’ve noticed since my diagnosis. The next day, I went to a local family-style restaurant I frequent and ordered my meal. Across the room in a booth, an argument erupted between a husband and wife. From what I gathered, it had something to do with simply keeping the house clean. It turned rather loud and nasty with a few choice expletives thrown in for good measure. To me, it seemed blown out of proportion. I just looked on in disbelief at the rage over something rather innocuous as cleaning a house. It was then that I realized we as humans tend to worry about the wrong things.

Now on to the next stage: implementation, which will occur shortly.

Remember this: all of this was triggered by a simple and routine blood test.

Again, please no sympathy cards or notes. A little prayer wouldn’t hurt though.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

tim75x75Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 29 Comments »

JOE BIDEN’S COAT TAILS?

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 9, 2021

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– Bad news for the Democrats as we approach the 2022 mid-terms.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

The recent election on November 2nd was a small, off-year contest. Yet, it was a major victory for Republicans and gives us a sense of what to expect in 2022 and 2024. During the election, the key Virginia positions went to the Republicans, including the governor’s mansion, and it appears the State House is reverting back to GOP control. This news is significant as Virginia was a highly contested state, one which the Democrats were determined to control. Other contests included several House seats which switched back to Republican control, and Minneapolis voters rejected the notion of replacing the police with a public safety department, something Democrats have been fighting for. However, Virginia alone has put the Democrats and their News Media into a panic mode.

All of this adds up to several things:

First, Americans are rejecting the liberal agenda of the Democrats, and prefer common sense solutions and smaller government. In Virginia, the key was school curriculum and the teaching of Critical Race Theory (CRT). This resulted in vocal school board meetings and President Biden labeling concerned parents as “Domestic Terrorists,” something that enraged the parents. Beyond this, Virginia became a referendum on the national priorities of the President and the Democrats.

The timing of the Democrats couldn’t be worse. After being elected with 81 million votes, which was touted as the most ever cast for a presidential candidate, Biden’s popularity shrunk radically in just nine short months to a 36% approval rating according to Zogby. Quinnipiac University has him at 38%, while Gallup and NBC have him at 42%, which is also low. Further, more than two-thirds of Americans believe the country is heading in the wrong direction, including half of the Democrats. Rasmussen supports this by claiming only 29% think the country is headed in the right direction. All of this is an indictment of President Biden’s policies and the liberal agenda embraced by the Democrats.

During the Virginia race, President Biden, VP Kamala Harris, and former President Obama, campaigned vigorously, all for naught. Instead of concentrating on the Virginia school problem, they opted instead to draw a parallel between former President Trump and Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin, hoping they could touch on the anger issues of the 2020 election. Interestingly, it did not, and in the end, it cost former Democrat Governor Terry McAuliffe the election.

This means President Biden has no coat tails for Democrats to ride on as we approach the critical 2022 mid-term election, which will likely put the Congress back in Republican hands. In other words, his endorsement would mean the kiss of death to Democrats running for office, and they will find themselves alone, fighting for re-election. To take it further, I cannot imagine President Biden running for re-election in 2024, and there is nobody on the horizon to replace him, certainly not Vice President Harris.

Frankly, Democrats should be unnerved by the results of the 2021 election as it foretells the future. The Democrats simply went too far, too fast in pushing their agenda. Between inflation and the economy, illegal immigration, energy, and foreign affairs, the Biden administration has not enjoyed any success by any stretch of the imagination, and Americans are pushing back in the voting booth. Consider this, GOP candidate Youngkin was at a 10 point deficit just a couple of months ago, yet he hung on, rallied the state and won handily as governor. Basically, he has carved a template for other Republicans to follow in 2022.

Yes, this is how unhappy Americans are with the Democrat agenda and President Joe Biden.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

SEND IN THE MILITARY…

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 2, 2021

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– …to fix our supply-chain problems.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

We’re hearing a lot about a massive supply chain problem whereby we do not have enough port workers and truck drivers to unload and ship materials throughout the country. Imports are radically up, and exports lag woefully behind, a telltale sign of problems with trade and the economy. Experts claim this supply chain problem will have an adverse effect on our upcoming holiday shopping season. To compensate, the Biden Administration proudly announced a deal to keep certain ports open around the clock, but the fact remains there are worker shortages.

Let’s be clear, under normal circumstances we would have enough longshoremen and truck drivers to maintain the supply chain, but these are unusual times. To illustrate, inflation is up, and as Bloomberg reports, “It now costs as much as $25,000 to import a 40-foot container from Asia, up from less than $2,000 two years ago.” The fact fuel has spiraled upwards since the beginning of the year also adds to the cost of living.

Nonetheless, we now have bottlenecks at our ports to accept imports, (with empty ships leaving with our exports), and we have an immediate need for manpower. The most obvious remedy is to use the military for both unloading ships and trucking. Some might argue this is a waste of military talent. Not really, as they have been doing such tasks for a long time. Nor is it without precedent.

I find it interesting most Americans have already forgotten President Ronald Reagan’s problem with FAA air-traffic controllers back in 1981. As a quick history lesson, this occurred just seven months into Reagan’s first term. At the time, the Professional Air-Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO) had gone on strike over wanting federal pay increases and a shorter work week. Almost immediately, this caused pandemonium in commercial flight schedules with many delays and cancellations. This brought the country to the brink of closing down air transportation.

Angered, President Reagan warned the members of PATCO to return to work or face termination. The union defiantly resisted, thereby causing Reagan to fire over 11,000 air-traffic controllers. Further, these people became ineligible to be re-hired. Now, without air-traffic controllers, the President called on the military to replace the union until new controllers could be found. It was a slow process, which affected business worldwide, but proved to be an effective means to solve the problem. Flights resumed and the country returned to normal.

This is precisely the type of action we need today. We may not have a defiant union to deal with, but we do have an immediate crunch-problem in terms of workers. If the Biden Administration is serious about fixing the problem, bringing in the military on an interim basis is a no-brainer. Think about it; what is the point of opening up our ports 24/7 if we lack the manpower to unload the ships and truck the merchandise? That is like buying a gun without any bullets; it’s totally useless.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

WHO IS RUNNING THE SHOW?

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 26, 2021

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– Obviously not President Biden.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

It is not much of a secret that President Biden’s approval ratings are tanking. His policies on the economy, immigration, and foreign affairs has led to his decline. In front of the press, he shows all of the signs of an old man in his dotage, e.g., lost, confused, lethargic, etc. His cognitive ability is now in question, as reflected in a recent Pew Research Poll (9/23/2021) whereby 56% of those surveyed thought the President was NOT mentally sharp. Even the foreign press openly questions his ability as leader of the free world, such as the Australian media (click HERE for another video).

All of this makes you wonder, who is really running the government? Personally, I believe it is a group of young administrators, fresh out of college, who possess a zeal for the liberal agenda.

Having junior people run things is actually not uncommon. To illustrate, in the medical field, particularly hospitals, doctors and nurses spend an inordinate amount of time inputting data into computers as opposed to treating patients. This means they spend less time practicing medicine, and more time fulfilling government mandated bureaucracy. So, who spends most of the time caring for patients? The junior people who do not have the knowledge and experience of the doctors and nurses. Because they are not burdened with the minutia as prescribed by government, they become the primary care workers by default, which is a bit unsettling when you think about it. The same is true in any business or government institution, particularly something as large as the United States.

The White House is primarily run by the Executive Office of the President (EOP), as created by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1939. The office has traditionally been home to the President’s closest advisors and run by the President’s Chief of Staff who is currently Ron Klain, an attorney, a loyal Democrat consultant, and a former lobbyist. Prior to his current assignment, he had been Chief of Staff for Al Gore and Joe Biden (under Obama). He also actively worked as a senior advisor to Biden’s presidential campaign. All of this means he is well connected to the Democrat machine and helped recruit the remaining office employees, of which there are approximately 1,800 with an annual budget of $714 million.

The EOP staff likely includes two types of people: retreads from the Obama administration who carry forward the former president’s policies, and; new zealous young prople advancing the liberal agenda. I believe it is this group, the EOP staff, who is driving the country and making the hard decisions.

The President’s senior EOP advisors work in the West Wing of the White House. The remainder are housed in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, just a stone’s throw away from the Oval Office.

Also keep in mind the EOP has counterparts in the Congress where there are approximately 13,500 staffers, of which in both chambers there are…

7,405 – Democrat staffers
6,148 – Republican staffers
13,553 – Total

The average age of a Congressional staffer is between 32-33 years. As in the medical analogy mentioned earlier, it is these people who perform the legwork and heavy lifting for the Congressmen and Senators who are busy campaigning, attending committee meetings, traveling, talking to constituents, lobbyists, and the news media.

Between the EOP and the Congressional staffers, it is these young people who are running the show in Washington. Such people historically did the busy work for their bosses, thereby allowing them to concentrate on big picture items. However, based on the President’s apparent lack of mental acuity, it appears someone is propping him up and making the decisions for him, most likely Chief-of-Staff Ron Klain and the EOP. They are likely getting input from former President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State John Kerry, former National Security Advisor Susan Rice, and Sen. Bernie Sanders, representing the liberal agenda.

The fact President Biden cannot seem to stand on his own two feet without committing some gaffes is disheartening and cause for concern. In a way, it is reminiscent of a Star Trek episode, “Patterns of Force,” whereby a weak and aging world leader becomes a puppet as his staff works behind the scenes to implement their agenda, not his. The comparison is uncanny.

To me, all of this means it is time to call a Constitutional Convention whereby our governing rules can be reexamined and amended accordingly. This would take important decisions out of the hands of the Congress and put them in a specially appointed delegation with members from each state. Such a Congress has not been held since 1787 (over 200 years). Think about it, this would be an opportunity to reform our electoral process, introduce term limits to eliminate the concept of lifetime politicians, lobbyist reform, and more. If you are waiting for the Congress to make such changes, don’t hold your breath. It will never happen, and more people will arise to the presidency as puppets.

For more information on a Constitutional Congress, see Article V of the Constitution.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: