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Archive for February, 2009

CONSERVATIVE STEREOTYPES

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 27, 2009

Following the release of one of my more politically inclined columns, I was accused by a reader of being an ultra conservative. The reader based his comments on established stereotypes of conservatives which I personally find distasteful. Such images have become rather old and tiresome, but were still effective in last year’s elections. These stereotypes were concocted by the Media over time and inevitably raise their ugly heads during election time. What concerns me though is these images are simply fallacious and aimed at misleading people away from the true issues at hand. Let me give you some prime examples of conservative stereotypes:

CONSERVATIVES ARE PRO-BUSINESS, EVEN AT THE EXPENSE OF SQUASHING ANYTHING THAT GETS IN THEIR WAY, INCLUDING THE LITTLE GUY.
I think it is no secret that conservatives believe in the free enterprise system, the land of opportunity, and an honest day’s wage for an honest day’s work, but I do not believe they are as ruthless as they are portrayed. They are unapologetic capitalists who want less government control, not more. Conservatives tend to see government as the servant of the people, not the other way around. This drives anybody opposed to this way of thinking absolutely crazy, particularly socialists and communists. It’s no small wonder that capitalists are portrayed as “fat-cats” who profit off the worker.

The reality is that you will find just as many liberals in the board room as you will find conservatives. Further, anyone who has faced the realities and risks of starting up his/her own company, particularly a small business, is somewhat inclined to appreciate capitalist principles.

CONSERVATIVES DO NOT SHARE AND WANT TO CREATE A MASTER/SLAVE CLASS SOCIETY.
This is just plain bunk. First, greed knows no political ideologue. Second, we’re back to the capitalist argument whereby conservatives appreciate hard work and reward accordingly. Look, it’s simple, you cannot do everything yourself; you have to delegate, empower, and support your people, which includes compensating them accordingly. It’s just plain smart business. And third, conservatives give generously of themselves for a wide variety of causes. Although they balk at turning their wallets completely over to the government, conservatives gladly lend a helping hand to those who truly need it. Liberals certainly do not hold a monopoly on charitable causes.

CONSERVATIVES ARE ANTI-ENVIRONMENT.
It is generally believed that if you are a conservative, you have a fundamental disregard for the planet; that you want to rape the Earth and eradicate its resources. My question is, “Why?” This would imply that conservatives are like some visitors from outer space here to plunder the earth’s resources and leave a dead shell. I’m afraid I haven’t seen the conservative flying saucer yet, and I think we are all stuck on this planet together. In fact, conservatives have found such things as conservation, recycling, and land reclamation are not just good ideas, it’s smart business.

CONSERVATIVES ARE ULTRA RELIGIOUS.
Show me a fanatical Bible thumper and I’ll show you a conservative; Right? Wrong. I can’t begin to tell you how many liberals I have met through organized religion. We often hear of the “Religious Right” which primarily consists of Christian groups, but I don’t recall where it is written that a belief in Jesus Christ is a prerequisite for becoming a conservative. In fact, I’ve met conservatives from just about every religious faith imaginable. I will grant that conservatives tend to derive their core values from their religious beliefs, whatever they may be, but they are certainly not religious fanatics.

There is an interesting dichotomy here: whereas conservatives are accused of unethical behavior in business and the environment, they are also portrayed as religious zealots. I guess the assumption here is that organized religion doesn’t promote ethical behavior.

CONSERVATIVES ARE UNEDUCATED, UNIMAGINATIVE, AND ONLY FOLLOW PARTY LINES.
There is a general belief that conservatives are incapable of intelligent discourse, are crude and lack creativity, and thereby must be told what to do. Gee, it kind of sounds like the goons in the Nazi Party under Adolph Hitler doesn’t it?

The notion that conservatives are old-fashioned fuddy-duddies who resist change is erroneous. I know a lot of liberals who have been unbending in their ideas since the 1960’s.

Since conservatives tend to have a business perspective they are somewhat inclined to be freethinkers, meaning if it makes sense to them, they’ll buy it, regardless of who sells it. They will also make it plain if they do not agree with you, and perhaps this is what bothers their opposition. In fact, I find conservatives to be more open to debate; for example, consider the popularity of conservative talk radio programs (you don’t see too many liberal programs do you?)

CONSERVATIVES DO NOT HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR.
For a long time, conservatives have had to endure all kinds of jokes as communicated through political bumper stickers, cartoons, and late night comedians. In the process I think they have developed some rather thick skin and do, in fact, appreciate a good joke, although I admit their humor is not as destructive as others. But what is good for the goose should be good for the gander. Try poking fun at a liberal and you are accused of blasphemy. Now that’s funny.

CONSERVATIVES ARE RACISTS.
I’m not even going to dignify this with a rebuttal.

CONCLUSION

The concept of conservative stereotypes is nothing more than brainwashing for the purpose of social engineering by the Media. Young people are taught early on that being a conservative is not “cool”…

“Did you know he is a conservative?”

“Really? He’s one of them? Wow! That’s lame.”

Behind the facade of the conservative stereotypes is a deeply-rooted resentment to capitalism, which the conservatives embrace. Anti-capitalists want to replace the system and evenly spread the wealth regardless of how much effort a person exerts to earn it. To conservatives, capitalism is the stimulus that encourages people to become entrepreneurs; to move forward and take risks, to boldly go where no one has gone before, to evolve, and hopefully succeed.

Like I said earlier, I have been accused of being an “ultra” conservative. As an aside, a friend recently pointed out to me, how come we do not apply this adjective to liberals (an “ultra” liberal)? I guess it is another attempt to stereotype conservatives as extremists (and liberals are not?).

It has been my experience that conservatives take their fiduciary responsibilities seriously, they are not afraid to be held accountable for their actions, they want to lead a worthy and meaningful life, and possess an ethical makeup derived from their religious beliefs. If this is what an “ultra” conservative is, then I plead, “Guilty. Most guilty.”

Sorry Janeane, the wiring is just fine.

“Show me a young Conservative and I’ll show you someone with no heart.
Show me an old Liberal and I’ll show you someone with no brains.”

– Winston Churchill

Such is my Pet Peeve of the Week.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is the Managing Director of M. Bryce & Associates (MBA) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For a listing of Tim’s Pet Peeves, click HERE.

Copyright © 2009 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Posted in Life, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

BICYCLISTS – THE “TOUR DE FARCE”

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 24, 2009

Now before I begin, let me say from the outset that I like bicycles and as  a kid I drove mine everywhere.  Someday I’ll have to tell you about my old  J.C. Higgins.  As an adult, I would take my kids for rides on my bike with a special child seat attachment.  In other words, I had a lot of fun with bikes over the years and regard them as an economical form of transportation and a great way to get some exercise.  But I draw the line there.  I have no delusions that I’m a world class athlete peddling in the “Tour de France” dressed in spandex and “Alien” shaped helmets riding on thousand dollar designer bicycles.

In my area on Saturday mornings it is not uncommon to find a pack of bicyclists commandeering the local roadways in what I call the “Tour de Farce.”  I find this particularly odd in light of the fact that our county spent a lot of money building a 34 mile trail to accommodate bicyclists and joggers, thereby providing a well paved riding trail that is safe and doesn’t interfere with mainstream traffic.  But the “Tour de Farce” couldn’t care less about the trail and, instead, dominates the local roadways.  If you have the audacity to try and pass them, you are either given a dirty look or the one finger salute.

I think people dressed in the “Tour de Farce” costumes believe they own the road and that motorists should be subservient to them.  Let me give you an example,  recently I was coming home after work and came upon a “TdF” bicyclist in the bicycle lane next to me.  As I was approaching my right turn to enter my neighborhood, I realized I had to stop to allow the bicyclist to travel on.  If I didn’t, I would have surely hit and injured him.  So as I slowed down and stopped before turning into my neighborhood, I half-expected the rider to say, “Gee, thanks (for looking out for me).” Instead, the bicyclist looked over at me with disdain and plainly said, “Jerk!” I was taken aback by this as I thought  I was doing him a favor.  This is not the first time I experienced something like  this with a bicyclist and I’m sure it won’t be my last.

What the “Tour de Farce” types don’t seem to understand is that the roadways belong to everyone, not just them, and they need to obey the same rules as the motorists.  Not long ago, I saw the Saturday morning pack go by and, as usual, were riding outside of the bicycle lane.  Shortly thereafter, I returned back that way where I noticed the paramedics treating one of the pack bicyclists who was evidently hit by a motorist.  While the pack appeared irritated by the accident, frankly, I wasn’t surprised.

Offhand, I don’t really have a problem with the “Tour de Farce” types.  It might even be fun.  But I think it’s rather reckless to drive on the roads when there is a perfectly good trail nearby offering safety.  If you want to ride on our roads in Florida, where we have drivers from all over the world  particularly the chilly north, you’re taking your life into your hands.  As for me, I’ll take my chances on the trail.

Such is my Pet Peeve of the Week.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is the Managing Director of M. Bryce & Associates (MBA) of Palm Harbor,
Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field.  He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For a listing of Tim’s Pet Peeves, click HERE.

Copyright (c) 2009 by Tim Bryce.  All rights reserved.

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

SURCHARGES

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 20, 2009

Last year when we were paying about $4.50 for a gallon of gasoline, you may remember companies started to add a surcharge to their bills. I saw it in our bills for garbage collection, pest control, irrigation maintenance, pool service, delivery men, etc. They did this to say they haven’t raised the price of their service, which I can’t believe anyone is stupid enough to believe, but you never know. I even saw a taxi with lettering on their doors stating they had the lowest fare rates in the town, but right below it they listed the surcharge to be added to the bill.

Airlines have also gotten into the act and now have surcharges for checked baggage to offset fuel costs. This “a la carte” mentality is becoming more pervasive in business and instead of paying one simple fee you are now presented with a lengthy bill representing a hefty price tag. The telephone companies are good at this as well, as anyone who has had to read their voluminous bills can tell you.

I really don’t understand the psychology of surcharges. Proponents argue that consumers like to believe they are paying low prices and that a surcharge is not a permanent part of the bill, that it’s only temporary and will be eliminated sometime in the near future. Right; and pigs will fly too. Now that fuel charges have radically declined, I don’t see too many companies eliminating the surcharges. In fact, the price of fuel has reduced so much you would think we would be entitled to a rebate of some kind. Fat chance for that. The only time you see a surcharge removed is when a company finally announces a price increase.

Something I learned a long time ago was that prices only go up; and rarely, if ever do they go down. Probably the best way to think of a surcharge is as a price increase in sheep’s clothing. But for those companies who think they are being clever in trying to pull the wool over the eyes of the public by using surcharges, please, don’t insult our intelligence; an increase is an increase, I don’t care what you call it.

Such is my Pet Peeve of the Week.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is the Managing Director of M. Bryce & Associates (MBA) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For a listing of Tim’s Pet Peeves, click HERE.

Copyright © 2009 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

CANCER, THE “BIG KAHUNA”

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 17, 2009

The World Health Organization recently reported that by 2010 cancer will replace heart disease as the number one global killer. I was a little surprised to learn this as I had always thought of cancer as number one for a long time. I realize other diseases such as heart disease, AIDS, Diabetes, Obesity, and Alzheimer’s are bad in their own right, but to me cancer has always been the “Big Kahuna” of them all. I don’t think there is anyone who hasn’t somehow seen or felt its effects. For example, I lost my grandmother to ovarian cancer years ago. I have also seen friends and other relatives lose battles to lung and brain cancer. Its all rather disturbing to see people cut down this way.

Recently, an old high school buddy of mine lost his battle with lung cancer. Mike was a sportswriter who lived and worked out of Washington state. He was very active and appeared to be physically fit. Interestingly, Mike wasn’t a smoker yet he developed a tumor the size of a golf ball in his left lung. After it was discovered and treatment prescribed, Mike developed a positive attitude as he went to do battle with the beast. As a writer, he would send his friends frequent updates on his progress even after his surgery. For a while it looked like he was going to beat it, but unfortunately an infection developed causing the doctors to open him up again and he didn’t survive. This one hit close to home as Mike was my age and a good guy. It particularly bothered me that he got lung cancer even though he was a nonsmoker and his family had no history of the disease.

The disturbing part of cancer is that the public really doesn’t know that much about it. It has been with us so long that I believe we now take it for granted. For example, I wasn’t aware there is now over 100 forms of cancer, such as lung, breast, brain, prostate, skin, pancreatic, leukemia, etc. Years ago, when you were diagnosed with cancer you were basically given your last rites. But the medical community has made progress over the last fifty years and cancer is now primarily treated with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Regardless of the progress though, cancer is still headed to number one as the WHO points out, and this is one “Big Kahuna” we could do without.

If you would like to learn more about cancer, I encourage you to visit the following web sites:

American Cancer Society
National Cancer Institute
Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Such is my Pet Peeve of the Week.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is the Managing Director of M. Bryce & Associates (MBA) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For a listing of Tim’s Pet Peeves, click HERE.

Copyright © 2009 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Posted in Life | Leave a Comment »

CONSUMER CONFIDENCE

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 13, 2009

As we are now embroiled in a major economic recession, we are hearing a lot about plant closings, worker layoffs, restructuring of companies, tightening of credit, and government stimulus packages. But as you listen to the news and talking heads on television, everything seems to come back to “consumer confidence” or the lack thereof to purchase anything. It appears our disposable income has been disposed of. I don’t hear anyone addressing this problem, so I’ll take a shot at it. I may not be an economist, but as a businessman who has been around the block a few times, I would do the following:

First, the consumer wants confidence that the companies they buy from will stand behind their products; that they will be there tomorrow. This means companies have to do some soul searching and manage themselves better. In other words, take out the bloated bureaucracies, eliminate the inflated salaries and greed, become more organized and systematic in their operations, and offer products at reduced, yet fair, prices.

Companies also have to learn to adapt to the needs of the consumer, not the other way around. Perhaps the best example of this currently is the Hyundai Assurance program whereby the company advertises, “to show you the faith we have in you. Right now, finance or lease any new Hyundai, and if in the next year you lose your income, we’ll let you return it.” There are, of course, restrictions to avoid abuse, but it’s a sharp idea and consumers are beginning to flock to them.

It is time for companies to challenge the marketing status quo and, like Hyundai, devise new programs that will turn the heads of the consumer. Companies can ill-afford to conduct business as usual.

Second, the government has a role here as well, but I balk at the stimulus package being proposed. People do not need pseudo “make work” jobs created by and for the government. Nor do we need more checks from the government which will primarily be used to pay off existing debts, not necessarily to purchase new goods. Instead, they want tax credits that support their way of life, like financing homes and sending kids to school. I realize such things already exist, but the government has to become more aggressive in such programs to allow the consumers to save a buck or two. Wouldn’t it be nice to see the government encourage the saving of money as opposed to spending it? Even better, to invest it in key companies who are trying to conquer our energy crisis, or who perform medical research, or help the environment.

If you really want the consumer to have “disposable income,” arrest inflation NOW! Government can do a lot for companies by simply leading them with a carrot and stick. Give tax credits to companies as incentives to go in new directions, such as research and development, or for companies who promote job security, for companies who help curtail the rising cost of living, and for creating real and meaningful jobs. In other words, reward companies for better management.

Third, the consumer has to learn to regain his own confidence. Instead of waiting for someone else to bail us out, we need to develop an entrepreneurial spirit and take the bull by the horns. Confidence begins in the mirror, not in our government.

Such is my Pet Peeve of the Week.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is the Managing Director of M. Bryce & Associates (MBA) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For a listing of Tim’s Pet Peeves, click HERE.

Copyright © 2009 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

HOME

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 10, 2009

This is not so much a pet peeve as it is an observation about the concept of “Home.” I don’t think we really appreciate home until we leave it for awhile, whether it is to go off to school, the military, or we simply grow up and move away. Even if we go on a business trip for a day, week or longer, we still want to get back to our own surroundings where we can kickback, scratch, belch, and be ourselves. It is our fortress of solitude.

If we’ve been away from home for an extended period, we notice small changes upon our return, perhaps a new street sign, new neighbors who painted the house next door or changed the landscape, or maybe the decor of your house has changed a bit. Nonetheless, you still know the roads, the people, the weather, the food, along with the schools and buildings. Even though your bedroom has been converted to a guest room, it is still “your” room with all of its hidden nuances.

This leads to an important point, I tend to believe that home is where your parents are. Sure, some things may have changed but home is still basically the same; your parents maintain the same routine, talk about the same type of things, and enjoy the same comfort food and special snacks you’ve grown accustomed to. This means there is a predictability factor associated with home. Even if your parents move, such as retiring to Florida, their new house or condo bears a striking resemblance to their old one; they decorate it the same way, they organize and store things the same way, and the tempo and cooking are still the same. In other words, you intuitively know where everything is and can predict what’s for dinner, what they’ll watch on television, and when everyone will go to bed.

Even when your parents pass away and the house has been sold, and you now live hundreds of miles away, there is still a special fondness in your heart for “home.” Home is much more than a physical structure, it defines what we once were and who we are now; it is our roots, our values, our likes and dislikes, our beliefs, and it represents our growing pains where we experienced both triumph and disaster.

Unfortunately, some people drift through life without any concept of home, perhaps due to a failed marriage or maybe they were orphaned. Such turn of events can emotionally scar a person and leave them with an identity crisis, never knowing their place in the world. As such, home obviously represents much more than a roof over our heads; it is an interesting tapestry reflecting our personalities, our values, and how we want to live our lives. It is most definitely where the heart is. Pity those who do not have one.

Such is my Pet Peeve of the Week.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is the Managing Director of M. Bryce & Associates (MBA) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For a listing of Tim’s Pet Peeves, click HERE.

Copyright © 2009 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

SOCIAL NETWORKING TOOLS

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 6, 2009

Not long ago I was asked by a young man about what he should be thinking about as he started his career in the business world. We talked about a lot of things, but more than anything I emphasized the need to network with his professional contemporaries. I recommended he join some industry groups, attend conferences, and basically start to interact with different people in his industry. But I tend to believe young people shy away from such personal interaction and instead prefer the anonymity of the various social networking facilities on the Internet, like Facebook, MySpace, and others. Most young people are familiar with these facilities from High School and College and use them to send messages, flirt, spread humor, rumors and spam, and harass people. You need not accurately identify yourself with such facilities, which means you can cause a great deal of trouble for others if you are so inclined.

There are also several social networking tools for professionals, such as LinkedIn, Plaxo, PerfectBusiness, ZoomInfo, and many others. They may not have the same robust facilities as found in Facebook and MySpace, nor the popularity, but they tend to attract the more serious minded person interested in their career and profession. People tend to more clearly identify themselves as well and, as such, there is less shenanigans associated with them. Nonetheless, anyone can register as a user and create false identities if they want to and abuse the system. Thanks to the cloak of anonymity as provided by the Internet, clods tend to disrupt the harmony of such Internet groups, thereby diminishing their usefulness. As an aside, I find it interesting that people will say things on the Internet they would never dare say to you face-to-face, which is why I no longer engage anyone on the Internet who doesn’t properly identify themselves. No, I don’t want to hear from anyone with a bogus handle for a name, particularly those based on some medieval nonsense. Like I said, clods.

These Internet services may be nice for sending messages and disseminating news, or for bringing people of common interests together, but they are certainly not a substitute for eye contact, a handshake, and the spoken word; they are most definitely not a substitute for personal interaction. As I have mentioned for quite some time, due to our heightened emphasis on technology I believe we are seeing a decline in the socialization skills of our young people. Instead of meeting and interacting with others, they are more inclined to hide behind a keyboard which I consider rather unfortunate. It’s difficult, if not impossible, to get to know someone’s interests, ethics, integrity, knowledge, and personal background by computer. To this end, I discussed with my young friend such things as how to properly do an introduction, how to make light conversation, how to develop contacts, how to dress for industry functions, even table manners and how to socially drink at such functions. Basically, I encouraged him to brush up on his people skills, not his computer skills.

Such is my Pet Peeve of the Week.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is the Managing Director of M. Bryce & Associates (MBA) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For a listing of Tim’s Pet Peeves, click HERE.

Copyright © 2009 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

POLITICAL CORRECTNESS – LET US BE BLAND

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 3, 2009

I recently read an article that listed the most obnoxious politically correct offenses for 2008 in our educational institutions (click HERE).

After reading a few of the case studies, your head begins to spin in terms of the stupidity involved. Evidently, our educators do not want to be accused of offending anyone, and as a result are shaping our youth into perhaps the most bland generation to come down the pike. It appears political correctness begins in the classroom and cascades into the corporate world and our daily lives.

This got me thinking how something becomes politically incorrect. First, the Media picks up on something meant to be humorous or avant-garde and, depending on their interpretation, determines if it is suitable for public consumption. Consideration is given to whether it offends a handicap, a sexual gender (except heterosexual men), race (except whites), religion (except Christians), or politics (except conservative Republicans). If it affects anyone in this regard, then it is condemned by the Media and labeled “politically incorrect.” The exceptions are, of course, fair game for attack as they are perceived as the suppressive superiors causing all of the problems. In other words, it is no longer acceptable…

  • to celebrate your Christian faith (Christmas, Easter, etc.).
  • to respect the sanctity of marriage between men and women.
  • to exercise authority as it might be perceived as a master/slave relationship.
  • to ridicule or attack liberal Democrats.

Instead, you are meant to feel guilty or embarrassed for who you are. By doing so, the Media is trying to turn the majority into a minority. Make no mistake, political correctness is nothing more than social engineering in sheep’s clothing, whereby our attitudes, perceptions, and moral values are being constantly tweaked by the Media.

Interestingly, some people still refuse to believe in the notion of political correctness, that it is not a valid concept. I don’t think such people have visited our schools or the corporate world lately. If they did, they would see substantial changes in our speech, customs, fashion, work habits, and socialization skills, all because the Media is telling us what is acceptable and what isn’t. Consequently, the Media has replaced our religious institutions as the social conscious of the nation.

Frankly, I sense a backlash to political correctness in the offing. As a small example, last December I noticed a lot more Christians saying “Merry Christmas” as opposed to “Happy Holidays.” In other words, they were tired of being ashamed of their religion and want to celebrate it as opposed to watering it down. Basically, they have grown weary of being told how to think.

I guess what disturbs me about political correctness more than anything is that it attacks our identity. Instead of celebrating who and what we are, political correctness wants us to feel ashamed instead, which, as I alluded to earlier, leads to blandness. Just remember one of our Bryce’s Laws, “Never trust a person who doesn’t have at least one known vice.” If they do not either drink, smoke, or swear, then they are in all likelihood hiding something and are as interesting as a box of rocks.

Such is my Pet Peeve of the Week.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is the Managing Director of M. Bryce & Associates (MBA) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For a listing of Tim’s Pet Peeves, click HERE.

Copyright © 2009 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Posted in Life | Leave a Comment »

 
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