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Archive for September, 2012

WHY DO OPPOSITES ATTRACT?

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 28, 2012

BRYCE ON OUR CHANGING WORLD

– Good question and something that has puzzled us from time immemorial.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)

To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

On a recent trip to work one morning I was tuned into a local radio talk show. One of the DJ’s mentioned he happened to be married to a vegan, yet he was a confirmed meat eater. The other two DJ’s sharing the microphone with him found this amusing, as did I, and they asked him what life was like living with a vegan, particularly at dinner time. Somehow they found a way to avoid squabbles and respect each other’s culinary preferences. One didn’t intrude on the other, and they have lived happily together for quite some time.

I am always intrigued by couples who appear to be incompatible on the surface, yet somehow find a way to build a successful marriage. I have seen tall people marry short people, fat and thin, wild versus mild, mixed religions, mixed races, and mixed politics. As to the latter, there is probably no better example than political pundits James Carville (Democrat) and Mary Matalin (Republican) who were married in 1993 and have two daughters. Even though they worked on opposing political campaigns, they somehow found the right chemistry to make their marriage work. This particular union has puzzled people for years, particularly due to their different personalities. When they appear on television, Carville is very animated and chatty, and Matalin appears more sedate and thoughtful. Both have strong personalities in their own right. When they appear on television together, they make it clear they do not agree on several political issues and try to correct each other, which can be rather amusing to watch. As I understand it though, politics is a taboo subject at home, particularly around their children. As an aside, I wonder if this political odd couple votes at election time since they will undoubtedly cancel each other out.

Then there are the law-abiding citizens who marry convicts while incarcerated. I never did quite understand this; a spouse who is free on the outside and a convicted criminal on the inside, never having physical contact or living together. Even people committing some of the most heinous crimes seem to score well from within the walls of prison. Maybe there is sex appeal in the forbidden fruit of a mass murderer, or maybe they’re just plain nuts. Somehow I have a hard time grasping death row as a lover’s lane.

How the opposite ends of a magnet are attracted is easier to explain than human compatibility. Scientists have a lot of theories for the attraction of people, but no conclusive facts. There are those who believe it is based on a biological and chemical arousal whereby people are attracted by scent which somehow matches the female’s hormonal status. This would suggest it’s all in the DNA. Then there are those who believe it is based on complementary psychological makeups, or maybe based on some astrological compatibility where the stars must be in some specific alignment.

As for me, I don’t buy any of this. Frankly, I’m not sure what it is that makes another person float your boat. Maybe it’s physical, maybe it’s logical. I tend to believe there is some specific element of the other person we find intriguing, and realizing they are complete opposites, we tend to work harder at building and maintaining a relationship than those people who are much more compatible. Keep in mind, there has to be more “give and take” in a marriage of opposites as opposed to those who are evenly matched. They have to work harder if they want to sustain it. A relationship of opposites will be obviously more challenging than a compatible relationship which will likely be more sedate. I guess some people thrive on a challenge, and some do not.

Maybe the only way this can be proven is by studying the duration of marriages and divorce rates of compatible couples versus polar opposites. Wouldn’t it be interesting if the opposite couples were more successful? Keep in mind, Carville and Matalin have now been married for 19 years, and it certainly couldn’t be due to their politics. In 2009, the two were interviewed by CNN’s John King who asked them how to maintain a happy marriage:

Carville: “I don’t have a position on anything domestically. So I just say yes, and then go on and do it. I mean it. I would say the three ingredients to successful marriage is surrender, capitulation and retreat.”

Matalin: “Spoken like a true liberal. What a martyr. Faith, family and good wine. That’s how we do it.”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2012 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.


NEXT UP: 
FIRST LESSONS IN JOINING THE WORK FORCE – “Got to pay your dues if you want to sing the blues, and you know it don’t come easy.” – Ringo Starr


Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, (12:30-3:00pm).

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Life, Marriage, Society | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

WELCOME TO FREEDOMVILLE

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 26, 2012

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– A children’s bedtime story teaching the lessons of capitalism, charity, and fairness. It sure beats “Red Fish, Blue Fish…”

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)

To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Preface: An entertaining bedtime story providing some fundamental lessons of life for your children, such as work ethic, honesty, responsibility, and simple business principles. Ages recommended: 6-10.
 

Once upon a time there was a fine young boy named Andy Workman who lived with his parents in Freedomville, a small town with a school, a library, a fire station, a police department, and many stores. In Freedomville, everyone was given an equal chance to work and live as they wanted to.

Andy was proud of his school. His teachers thought he was special as he learned his lessons quickly, studied at night, and always completed his homework on time. He also loved to read and went to the library regularly or visited the local book store. He was fond of books about adventure, travel to foreign lands, and humor. His favorite books though were about mechanics and how to build or fix things.

Andy’s parents thought he was special too. Although they didn’t have much, they were proud of their small home and kept it clean. Everyone worked hard around the house. Andy’s job was to mow the lawn and sweep the garage. Even though Andy was only eleven, he did a very good job. So much so, his father would give him a small weekly allowance which Andy would save.

The neighbors were so impressed by how Andy mowed his father’s lawn that one-by-one they began to hire him to mow their lawns as well. Andy worked hard and did a good job which impressed the neighbors. He would never let them down and the neighbors paid Andy for his hard work which he would save with his allowance.

One day, Andy’s Dad asked him, “What are you going to do with all your money?”

“I’m thinking of a couple of things Dad; first, I want to buy a new bicycle to ride to school. And I want to buy Mister Smithers’ old lawn mower which I want to fix up.”

“But then you’ll have two lawn mowers,” Andy’s Dad said, “You cannot push two mowers can you?”

“That’s right. My friend Tommy is going to work with me and we’ll be able to mow more lawns and make more money.”

So, Andy bought his new bike and the old lawn mower which he fixed up.

Shortly thereafter, Andy and his friend Tommy were mowing all of the lawns on his block and earned a lot of money for their efforts. Andy saved his money but occasionally would buy a book to read.

Andy’s new bike was big, shiny and fast. Everyone at school liked it, including Sammy Servant, the bully of the class. Sammy was bigger than Andy and he would scare a lot of kids. He would often demand lunch money from the other kids for his cousin, Harry Havenot, a lazy thug who was smaller than Sammy and not very smart.

When Sammy spotted the new bike, he called Andy over to him.

“I noticed your bike Andy,” Sammy said. “You know my cousin Harry only has an old bike that doesn’t work too well.”

Andy knew of the worthless bike which was the joke of the school.

Sammy went on, “You seem to be doing pretty well with your lawn service and have more money than both Harry and I. I think it would only be fair that you trade your bike for Harry’s, don’t you?” and he looked at Andy menacingly.

Of course Andy didn’t think it was fair but was afraid to fight Sammy, and he traded his bike for Harry’s.

Somehow Andy was able to peddle the old bicycle home, but it wasn’t easy as the chain kept falling off. When he got home, he took the bike apart in his garage, fixed it, and cleaned it up. He even painted it. To Andy, it seemed nobody had ever taken care of the bike. When he was done, it didn’t look too bad. It drove fine and was no longer an embarrassment.

Andy did not hear his father come up behind him in the garage. “Whose bike is this Andy?” he asked, “And where is your new one?”

Andy gulped as he was ashamed how he let Sammy Servant bully him. “Well Dad, it’s like this…” and he confessed the problem to him.

“Well this will never do,” said the father and he called the school principal to discuss the problem. When he was finished he said to Andy, “I spoke to your principal and he assured me he will settle the problem tomorrow. You will get your bike back.”

Andy was delighted.

The next day, the principal made Sammy and Harry return Andy’s bike which was already scuffed up from being dropped carelessly by Harry. “We’re sorry!” they said reluctantly under the glare of the principal.

As the boys swapped bikes, Harry was surprised by how well his old bike looked and worked, which was much better than the day before. Even though he now liked his old bike he still treated it badly and in just a few days he scuffed it like before.

Andy took his bike home and shined it up as good as new again. From then on, he kept it safely locked up and away from Harry.

There were no more problems until the last week of the school year when Sammy cornered Andy again. “Andy, you’re a good student aren’t you? You get nothing but straight A’s don’t you?”

Andy agreed he did.

Sammy continued, “Well, Harry has a problem. He may flunk out and have to repeat the fifth grade. I’m sure you do not want this to happen, do you? During the final test this week, I want you to let Harry copy your answers. And you better let him or you’ll have trouble from me.”

Andy was aware of the dangers of cheating on tests. He could be suspended from school and face other penalties, not to mention letting his parents down.

“No, I’m not going to allow that,” said Andy surprisingly defiant, “I worked too hard for my grades and I’m not going to risk ruining my record only because Harry didn’t do his work. It would be one thing if you asked for my help in studying for the test, but it is quite another to cheat.” And Andy stared down the two until Sammy finally backed down. Good thing too, as Andy was prepared to fight them, win or lose.

Many years went by, and Andy grew up to become a fine young man. His lawn mowing service earned a lot of money which he used to grow his business. In a few short years, Andy’s company had several employees and was mowing most of the lawns in Freedomville. The company also helped pay his way through the local college where he earned a degree in business.

Sammy and Harry also grew up. Harry did not do well in school and eventually dropped out and became homeless. Sammy graduated from High School and went to work for the local government where he enforced local rules and ordinances, such as displaying street signs, and making sure companies like Andy’s didn’t make too much noise when they worked.

Every now and then, Sammy would accuse one of Andy’s employees of an infraction of the rules, but if he paid him some money he would not report him. Of course, the employee hadn’t broken any rule at all, it was just Sammy’s way of trying to get additional money. When Andy heard of this, he went to see Sammy and asked him to stop bothering his employees or he would tell the police. Sammy backed down, but he was mad that he couldn’t scare Andy anymore.

Jealous of Andy’s success, Sammy came up with an idea to cause him more trouble. He proposed a new law to tax people who own lawn mowers, and that the money would be used to support the poor homeless people in town, such as his cousin Harry.

Andy did not like this idea. If it became law, his hard-working company would have to pay for loafers like Harry. He didn’t think this was fair. Andy told all of his friends and customers about the unfair law. If it passed, he would have to raise his prices for lawn care. Andy was so persistent that when election time came, Sammy’s tax law did not pass and all went back to normal.

Shortly afterwards, Andy was walking downtown when he came upon Sammy and Harry. Sammy was mad that Andy had helped to defeat his tax plan. Before he could say anything though, Andy reached into his pocket and pulled out some money which he gave to Harry. This surprised both Sammy and Harry.

“Why did you give him money? I thought you were cheap and greedy,” asked Sammy.

“I’m neither,” explained Andy, “I don’t mind helping people when I can, that is my decision and nobody else’s, but I refuse to let anyone tell me how I should spend the money I worked hard for. It’s none of their business.”

Harry complained, “You’re more lucky than we are Andy.”

“Luck has nothing to do with it guys. Was I lucky that I made good grades in school or was it because I studied hard? Was I lucky to build my business from nothing or did I work hard? I think the answer is obvious. You believe the world owes you a living. It doesn’t. Each day is a blessing, we can make of it what we want. We may succeed or we may fail, but we must at least take responsibility and try to make the best of things. And if we fail, hopefully someone will lend a helping hand, but it is up to each of us to get up and keep moving forward. If you want something, you just have to work hard to earn it. It’s that simple.”

Sammy and Harry began to think about what Andy said. They knew they had tried to cheat life and realized he was telling the truth. And if Andy could do it, why couldn’t they? “Is it too late for us to change?” they asked Andy.

“It’s never too late to start. How would you like a job working for me in my lawn service business? I promise you nothing but hard work, and the benefits resulting it, such as good pay and some self respect.”

“When do we start?” they asked Andy.

“How about right now?” and they shook hands.

 

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2012 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.


NEXT UP: 
WHY DO OPPOSITES ATTRACT? – Good question and something that has puzzled us from time immemorial.


Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, (12:30-3:00pm).

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Life, Politics | 5 Comments »

COMMON COURTESY

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 24, 2012

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

– A simple form of communications which reflects our character.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)

To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I recently discussed the four basic types of personalities; A, B, C and D. In addition to the different personality types, we as humans have a wide variety of interests and non-interests (“turnoffs”), as well as highs and lows. As such, it is impossible to know precisely how to properly relate to everyone in every situation all of the time. The common leveler is common courtesy. By this I most definitely am not referring to “political correctness” which is concerned with pseudo-courtesy for political purposes. Instead, common courtesy represents a genuine respect for the human spirit and how we should interact. This is much more than just saying “please” and “thank you,” it’s treating others as we want others to treat us.

Each day we transmit a series of messages which communicate how we regard others. This is done either verbally or through other means affecting our senses. These messages can either be perceived as positive or negative. For example, someone who dresses or smells badly is sending a message that he has no regard for the others around him, as does foul habits such as belching or flatulence. Conversely, good grooming means you care how people perceive you. Other positive messages are conveyed through such things as greetings and handshakes, punctuality, and simple manners. Common courtesy, therefore, is concerned with sending positive messages as opposed to negative. It also means our ability to practice common courtesy is a reflection of our character and how we want other people to treat us.

Introductions, Handshakes & Greetings

In Japan, an introduction in a business setting is very important. In addition to identifying yourself, it establishes your professional image, and the superior/subordinate relationship for the two parties to assume (the “pecking order”). Consequently, the Japanese practice introductions carefully, particularly how a business card is presented, as they realize its importance. In contrast, people in the western world have a much more cavalier attitude towards introductions. Nonetheless, the introduction is every bit as important and sends signals as to how we perceive each other.

A lot of people underestimate the importance of a handshake. Actually it is the single most important message we can convey in an introduction. Some people like to give a strong vice grip handshake in an attempt to intimidate you, but most handshakes today by young people are weak and flabby. Actually you need to find a good balance, not too flabby and not too strong. Further, look the other person square in the eyes when you shake hands, this conveys your sincerity in meeting the person. Do not trust anyone who simply shakes your hand but doesn’t look you in the eyes; they simply do not care about you.

Shaking hands has historically been a very masculine custom, but this has changed in recent times. However, men still question the appropriateness of shaking a woman’s hand. Because of this, it is the woman’s responsibility to offer her hand. If she does not offer her hand, do not reach for it as she may feel uncomfortable doing so.

Upon meeting someone for the first time, be careful about using the other person’s first name or nickname as this may be reserved for the person’s friends and family. Use “Mister”, “Ms”, “Mrs” or “Miss” depending on how you were introduced and allow them to say, “Please call me Joe.” But if by chance you ask, “May I call you Joe?”, don’t be surprised if someone says, “No.” In other words, do not risk embarrassment, let the other person make the offer to use their first name or nickname. And please, whatever you do, do not call the other person “Dude,” this should have gotten out of your vernacular after graduating from High School.

It is also a good practice to memorize the other person’s name, particularly when a business card is unavailable. Nothing is more embarrassing in a business relationship to both parties than to forget a name. Write it down if you cannot remember it.

It is a good practice to greet your boss and coworkers on a daily basis when reporting to work (as well as saying your farewell at the end of the day). Nobody wants to feel unwelcome or unappreciated. If they do, they will feel like outcasts and less likely to help you with something. The objective is to make people feel at home. This can be accomplished with a simple greeting such as “Good morning” or “How are you?” It is easy to detect when a greeting is sincere or routine. Your goal is to appear genuinely concerned about the person. This can be achieved by:

* Complimenting on some personal attribute of the person (e.g., clothes, hair, car).

* Inquiring about a person’s family (e.g., birthday observed, anniversary, graduation, pets, health, etc.)

* Asking about an event the person recently experienced (e.g., attendance at an event, a trip, participation in a volunteer organization/charity, a new job or project assignment, etc.),

* Commenting on something newsworthy – community, sports, weather (“What did you think about…?”)

Such greetings are an expression of your interest in the person. Too often greetings become routine and, as such, less credible. Try to break it up.

A good basic greeting can work wonders in building cooperation and relations between people.

Attention to Detail

Small details can have a dramatic effect in your relationship with others. For example:

* Be observant – if there is anything constant in life, it is change. Change is always around us, but it takes a perceptive person to be able to spot the smallest of changes, whether it be a new hair style, someone losing weight, a small job well done, or whatever. When a change is observed, ask yourself why it has happened. Be inquisitive and understand the rationale for the change. This will help you adapt to the change as well as improve your interpersonal relations. For example, people are easily flattered when someone compliments them on a change. It means you are perceptive and interested in the person, both of which puts you in good standing with the other person.

It is these little observations that go a long way. As an example, perhaps the best secretary I ever met was a lady named Myrna who worked for an I.T. Director in Chicago. The first time I visited the office, Myrna warmly greeted me and asked if I wanted a cup of coffee. Saying Yes, she then asked me what I wanted in it. I said cream and sugar, which she then made for me. Months later when I returned to visit the Director, Myrna greeted me by name and presented me with a cup of coffee with cream and sugar. Frankly, I was startled she not only remembered my name but how I also liked my coffee. Later I discovered Myrna maintained a simple card file; whenever someone visited the office, Myrna would record their name and the type of coffee they liked. Sharp. Very sharp.

This article is included in my book, “MORPHING INTO THE REAL WORLD – A Handbook for Entering the Work Force.”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2012 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.


NEXT UP: 
WELCOME TO FREEDOMVILLE – A children’s bedtime story teaching the lessons of capitalism, charity, and fairness. It sure beats “Red Fish, Blue Fish…”


Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, (12:30-3:00pm).

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Business, Communications, Management | Tagged: , , , , | 5 Comments »

TALKING TO THE ANIMALS

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 21, 2012

BRYCE ON OUR CHANGING WORLD

– The death of discourse, another casualty of the 21st century.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Have you ever noticed how people tend to be kinder and more understanding to their pets as opposed to the people around them, be it family, friends, coworkers, shopkeepers, or whoever? The contrast is startling. Whereas some people bristle at others, pets have become their pride and joy. So much so, people have no problem paying hundreds or thousands of dollars for dogs and cats. Years ago you could pick up a pet for as little as $20, with papers. Now, not only do people shell out big bucks for pets but lavish them with expensive food and toys, not to mention grooming and health issues which can also cost hundreds of dollars. Their teeth are now brushed, their nails painted, and hair carefully coiffed. Frankly, nothing is too good for them. It’s a bit disturbing though, when the pet receives more attention than the people surrounding the owner.

People tend to believe their attraction to pets is because of the “unconditional love” they have for their owners. Dogs can certainly be loyal and possess distinct personalities, but I think it is a matter of the love and attention bestowed on the pet as opposed to the other way around. People like them because they know the animal will not challenge the person’s authority and will live according to the owner’s rules. They will even have conversations with their pets in an attempt to communicate with them. Deep down people know they cannot respond so they invent a reply for the animal to give. Some people have whole conversations with animals as opposed to the people around them. The pet depends on the owner for care and feeding, and the owner depends on the pet for an interpersonal relationship. This forms a strong bond between the two which is often stronger than those between humans.

I think a lot of this is due to our failure to properly socialize. Thanks to technology, we as a species, have become more reclusive. People would rather plug in and tune out as opposed to talking to the person sitting next to them. When we try to converse, we either become sensitive to political correctness or attack the other person’s point of view viciously. Instead of engaging in an argument or stepping on somebody’s toes, many people prefer talking to their pets, probably because they know their response will be predictable. Since pets do not talk back, people prefer their company as opposed to human contact which I consider rather odd.

If you could somehow track it, you would probably discover a parallel between the increased use of technology and the boom in the pet industry. People want the touch and comfort of another organism, just as long as it isn’t human.

I happen to participate in a weekly get-together with a group of men. In addition to enjoying some libations and a good cigar, we talk. Frankly, we talk about a lot of different things. We discuss politics, religion, history, current events, sports, humor, right and wrong, and just about everything else. We do not see eye-to-eye on everything which often leads to some interesting arguments, where we must ask questions and defend our positions. This is not destructive discourse but rather constructive instead. By doing so, we learn from each other and have cultivated strong interpersonal relationships. It’s refreshing to sit among people where you do not fear offending anyone or starting a fist fight, but rather to address a subject rationally. Sometimes, these discussions can become spirited, but there is no malice in them, and by doing so we find them to be enlightening and somewhat therapeutic. I feel fortunate to be among such men and relish our weekly discussions. To be able to talk on the level, where the challenge is to seek understanding, and where a person’s word is their bond, can be both informative and comforting.

I have mentioned our weekly discussion group to other people I know. Most are envious of such a venue where you can speak openly and frankly without fear of repercusions. Many have told me when they get together with friends, neighbors, or business associates, the discussion is rather shallow and meaningless, and nothing like what I described. This makes me believe we generally have a fear of openness, something that is not an issue with a pet, where we can be who we really want to be.

There is something to be said about looking a person in the eye and telling them precisely what you think without fear of retribution. You certainly cannot do this through social media. And I do not care how smart you think your cat or dog is, you cannot do it with them either.

Just remember, the fictional character Doctor Dolittle was considered an oddball eccentric, certainly not normal.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2012 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.


NEXT UP: 
COMMON COURTESY – A simple form of communications which reflects our character.


Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, (12:30-3:00pm).

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Communications, Life, Pets, Society | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

THE JOE BIDEN FOLLIES

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 19, 2012

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– The Michael Scott of the Obama Administration.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Vice President Joe Biden has become the poster child for flubs and gaffes. Quite often the President has had to take action for something his VP has said and spin it to make it more palatable to the public. In a way, Mr. Biden reminds me of the Michael Scott character on NBC’s “The Office” whereby he speaks to the camera to make some sort of witticism which is either baffling or just plain embarrassing. The Vice President’s blunders are well documented in both print and video. On “YouTube” for example, there is quite a library of his most embarrassing remarks.

When interviewed on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Biden delighted Republicans by referring to Governor Mitt Romney as “President Romney.” He also seemed to have trouble understanding who exactly he worked for as he referred to the president as “President Clinton.”

His most recent faux pas was in Virginia when he said, “Look at what they (Republicans) value, and look at their budget. And look what they’re proposing. (Romney) said in the first 100 days, he’s going to let the big banks write their own rules — unchain Wall Street. They’re going to put y’all back in chains.”

This little remark angered the black community on both sides of the aisle and caused the administration to go into damage control.

In Athens, Ohio (and home of my Alma Mater), the Veep experienced a problem in counting; “Look, John’s last-minute economic plan does nothing to tackle the number-one job facing the middle class, and it happens to be, as Barack says, a three-letter word: jobs. J-O-B-S, jobs.”

Somehow this incident reminded me of the Dan Quayle 1994 “potato” spelling error, except without the fanfare from the press.

For an administration extremely sensitive to racial remarks, they cringed when they heard Biden say on C-SPAN, “You cannot go to a 7-11 or a Dunkin’ Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent…. I’m not joking.”

In April 2012, Biden tried to defend the president’s foreign policy by making a comparison to Teddy Roosevelt’s “Big Stick” policy; “Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far. I promise you, the President has a big stick. I promise you.”

Like Michael Scott, he was puzzled why his remarks resulted in gales of laughter from the audience.

In welcoming the Irish Prime Minister to the White House in March 2012, he shared “An old Irish saying; May the hinges of our friendship never go rusty,” and when describing the relationship between the two countries, he insisted, “there’s no doubt about them staying oiled and lubricated here.”

I’m sure the Irish PM is still shaking his head over this stereotype.

This has been but a small sampling of the Vice President’s gaffes. There are, of course, many more. He has consistently made statements which have embarrassed not only the administration but Americans everywhere, yet the press treats him with kid gloves and merely says, “Oh, that Joe, there he goes again.” Had a Republican made any one of these comments, he would have been unmercifully attacked by the press. Dan Quayle is an excellent example, any slip of the tongue by the VP during his term and the media chastized and berated him. The same was true with Sarah Palin when she ran as John McCain’s vice presidential nominee. So much for “fair and balanced.”

The one remark of Biden’s which I consider somewhat prophetic was in 2008 when he said, “Make no mistake about this. Hillary Clinton is as qualified or more qualified than I am to be vice president of the United States of America.”

Wow, he got that one right. We certainly do not need a Michael Scott as Vice President.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2012 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.


NEXT UP: 
TALKING TO THE ANIMALS – The death of discourse, another casualty of the 21st century.


Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, (12:30-3:00pm).

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch and throughout the Internet.

Posted in humor, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | 6 Comments »

UNDERSTANDING CORPORATE CULTURE

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 17, 2012

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

– In order for employees to function and succeed, it is essential they understand and believe in the culture.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

The subject of “corporate culture” seems to be on everyone’s mind these days; from the college graduate entering the job market, to the executive who is trying to improve management and productivity in his organization. It is the topic of interest at social and professional gatherings.

The perceptive manager understands the importance of establishing and controlling the work environment, including both logical and physical considerations. Unfortunately, many managers do not appreciate the concept of corporate culture and how to use it to their advantage.

Corporate culture pertains to the identity and personality of the company we work with, either in the private or public sectors. All companies have a culture; a way they behave and operate. They may be organized and disciplined or chaotic and unstructured. Either way, this is the culture the company has elected to adopt. In order for an employee to function and succeed, they must be able to recognize, accept and adapt to the culture.

MEMBER VS. ALIEN

Have you ever noticed how people react to foreign visitors; whether an exchange student or a visiting professional? The stranger may be welcomed, but may never be accepted unless that person can adapt to the norms of their new environment. If they do not, the members will shun the stranger and reject the alien from their culture. The same is true in business. If the new employee, consultant or visitor cannot adapt to the corporate culture, their chances for success are slight. The members of the culture will reject the person outright and will work against them.

The reason for this phenomenon is because people tend to prefer conformity in their culture. Conformity represents a harmonious environment where the behavior and actions are predictable. Most people have a deeply rooted desire for a sense of order and stability in their lives, which is what conformity provides. A stable environment promotes self-confidence in the members of the culture and allows them to concentrate on their work.

HUMAN PERSPECTIVE

Corporate culture deals with how we see ourselves and others. We act on our perceptions, not necessarily what occurs in reality. The culture greatly influences our perceptions and behavior. For example, our values and beliefs may distort what happens in fact. Gossip, propaganda, and a sensational press, deals with what people want to hear, not necessarily what happens in reality.

DEFINING CULTURE

Before we can alter the culture, we must first understand it. Culture is defined as “the characteristics of the members of a civilization.” Ultimately, culture defines the quality of life for a group of people.

Culture doesn’t appear suddenly, it evolves over time as people grow and learn. The older the heritage, the more ingrained the culture is in its members.

There are essentially three parts to any culture: Customs, Religion and Society. Each influences the others.

CUSTOMS

Webster defines custom as a “long-established practice considered as unwritten law.” Custom dictates the expected manner of conduct for the culture. It prescribes the etiquette to be observed in dress, speech, courtesy and politics (gamesmanship). Several companies, most notably IBM, have long understood the power of customs. These norms are established to project a particular image the company wishes to convey.

RELIGION

Religion is the philosophy of life and the basis for our values. It influences our judgement in terms of what is ethical and what is not. Although uniform morality sounds attractive to executives, it can be quite dangerous if unethical practices are allowed to creep into the moral fiber of the company.

SOCIETY

Society defines our interpersonal relationships. This includes how we elect to govern and live our lives. Society defines the class structure in an organization, from Chairman of the Board to the hourly worker. It defines government, laws and institutions which must be observed by its members. More often than not, the society is “dictated” by management as opposed to “democratically” selected by the workers.

INFLUENTIAL FACTORS

Obviously, it is people, first and foremost, that influence any culture. In terms of corporate culture, the only external factor influencing the enterprise is the “resident culture,” which is the culture at any particular geographical location. The resident culture refers to the local customs, religion and society observed in our personal lives, outside of the workplace. The resident culture and corporate culture may differ considerably in some areas but are normally compatible.

Anthropologists have long known the physical surroundings, such as geography and climate, greatly influence the resident culture. The resident culture, in turn, influences the corporate culture. The corporate culture, which affects the behavior of its members, will greatly influence the resident culture.

SUB-CULTURES

Within any culture there are those people exhibiting special characteristics distinguishing them from others within an embracing culture; this is what is called “sub-cultures.” In a corporate culture, sub-cultures take the form of cliques, special interest groups, even whole departments within a company. This is acceptable as long as the sub-culture does not violate the norms of the parent culture. When the characteristics of the sub-culture differ significantly from the main culture, it becomes a culture in its own right. This situation can be counterproductive in a corporate culture, a company within a company. For example, we have seen several IT organizations who view themselves as independent of the companies they serve. They “march to their own drummer” doing what is best for the IT Department, not necessarily what is best for their company. Conversely, we have seen management regulate the IT department as a separate, independent group as opposed to a vital part of the business.

CHANGING THE CORPORATE CULTURE

Changing the corporate culture involves influencing the three elements of the culture: Customs, Religion and Society. This is not a simple task. It must be remembered that culture is learned. As such, it can be taught and enforced. However, the greater the change, the longer it will take to implement. It should evolve naturally over time. A cultural revolution, such as the one experienced in communist China, is too disruptive for people to understand and accept. As a result, they will resist and rebel.

A smaller company can change its culture much more rapidly than a larger company, simply because of communication considerations. In addition, an organization in the private sector can change faster than one in the public sector (such as a government agency), only because a commercial company isn’t encumbered with government regulations. This is an instance where a “dictatorship” works more effectively than a “democracy.”

To change the corporate culture, one must begin by surveying the current corporate and resident cultures, including the customs, religion and society observed. There are several indicators for measuring the pulse of the culture: Absenteeism, Tardiness, Turnover, Infractions of Rules, Employee Attitudes, Productivity, etc. All of these can be used to gauge how people behave within the corporate culture.

This is followed by a set of requirements for the culture and a plan to implement them. In a corporate culture, a policy and procedures manual can usually stipulate the customs and society to be observed. Developing a corporate consciousness is far more difficult to implement and involves considerable training and demonstration. Great care must be taken to avoid the “do as I say, not as I do” situation.

It is one thing to enact legislation, quite another to enforce it. Without an effective means to monitor and control the culture, it is quite futile to establish any formal policies or guidelines.

SUMMARY

Management is much more than just meeting deadlines. It is a people-oriented function. If we lived in a perfect world, there wouldn’t be a need for managers. People would build things correctly the first time and on schedule, on costs. The fact of the matter is that we live in an imperfect world. People do make mistakes; people do have different perspectives, etc. Management is getting people to do what you want them to do, when you want them to do it. The corporate culture is a vital part of the art of management. Failure to recognize this has led to the demise of several managers, but for those managers who take it into consideration, the corporate culture can greatly influence the productivity of any organization.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2012 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.


NEXT UP: 
THE JOE BIDEN FOLLIES – The Michael Scott of the Obama Administration.


Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, (12:30-3:00pm).

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Business, Management | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

A LITTLE SILLY

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 14, 2012

BRYCE ON OUR CHANGING WORLD

– Why we need a light hearted distraction now and then.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

There’s not too much to laugh about these days; unemployment is still high, our economy is still in shambles, and the media has the general populace whipped into a frenzy over the elections in the Fall. In fact, the general disposition of the country is rather depressing, which is why it is refreshing to see or hear something that lifts our spirits, something a little silly. As for me, not long ago I was waiting in line at my bank’s drive-in window when a man drove up on a red motorcycle whom I judged to be in his sixties. This was no ordinary motorcycle as it had an attached sidecar with a golden retriever proudly perched inside wearing goggles and a red bandana. It appeared the dog was enjoying himself immensely and didn’t seem encumbered by the attire his owner had dressed him in. The sight of the dog stopped everyone in their tracks, both in and outside of the bank. The bank tellers called their colleagues to the window to see him, and the other patrons waiting in line rolled down their window to get a better look. He was simply a very cool pooch who seemed to enjoy the attention, as did his master.

This particular couple have become regulars in our area and are often seen on the roadways around Palm Harbor, a tiny community on the suncoast of Florida. Everywhere the two go, they are met by smiles and pointed fingers. They lift the spirits of people wherever they go. Golden retrievers are pretty cool dogs to begin with, but when you add goggles and a bandana, they become real hams. It’s as if they know what they’re doing and are daring you not to laugh. I’ve seen other types of dogs sitting in sidecars, but the golden retriever seems to own it, particularly if he is dressed properly.

Now, more than ever we need a little silly in our lives. Walking around in a depressed or angry mood can make for some rather deep psychological scars. It is important to now and then do something a little silly thereby lifting the mood of others and ourselves. I believe our friend with the motorcycle is very cognizant of this, which is why the pair take to the streets like Batman and Robin to bring a little cheer to the citizens of our area. We don’t know exactly who the Dynamic Duo are, as their goggles conceal their identity, but they are warmly welcomed wherever they go. It’s a nice little silly that can break the tension regardless of who you are or the problems you are experiencing. For one brief moment, you cannot help by being distracted, thanks to a little silly.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2012 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.


NEXT UP: 
UNDERSTANDING CORPORATE CULTURE – In order for employees to function and succeed, it is essential they understand and believe in the culture.


Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, (12:30-3:00pm).

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch and throughout the Internet.

Posted in humor, Life | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »

WHAT IS THE AMERICAN DREAM?

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 12, 2012

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– Is it still “the land of freedom and opportunity”?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

For many years, the American Dream was characterized as “the land of freedom and opportunity,” where a person could move about untethered and not be beholden to anyone, particularly the government. People were free to try their hand at anything if they were so inclined, thereby encouraging an entrepreneurial spirit. They also realized they had a say in how government was run, unlike several other countries, thereby encouraging citizenship and patriotism. The general belief was that if you worked hard, you could enjoy the fruits of your labor. I personally know this was the case with my grandfather who immigrated to America following World War I. It was his desire to have a better life and work environment than what he was leaving behind in Great Britain. To him, America was big, opportunities were plentiful, and the sky seemed the limit. After finding work in this country, he moved and settled his family, blended into the community, and never looked back. It was an arduous process to go through, but he was proud to become an American citizen, something millions of other immigrants were proud to do. They were all willing to work hard and sacrifice in order to realize the “Dream.”

I still believe this to be the American Dream but I fear it is changing. People now come to this country not necessarily for the principles it represents but more for the benefits they can receive, such as health care, education, and other perks such as food stamps and cash, thereby becoming the “land of entitlements” as opposed to opportunity. Such perks are putting a stressful burden on state governments, particularly those in the Southwest whose hospitals and schools are buckling under the strain. The general belief now seems to be that you will prosper regardless if you work or not.

Aside from illegal immigrants, a class of people has emerged in this country who have found it easier to live on government subsidies as opposed to working. So much so, it has become addictive and, consequently, apathy grows. In essence, they have become wards of the state. This has become glaringly obvious with Native Americans who are dependent on federal subsidies as coordinated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, under the U.S. Department of the Interior. Despite the millions of dollars given to them by the government, they have the lowest life expectancy and the highest poverty level, and where only one in four people have a job. All of this because they sincerely believe the government owes them something.

Helping those in need has changed from a charitable donation to what is perceived as a “right.” It is a harsh reality that as more people embrace the notion of entitlements, fewer people become available to pay for it. Keep in mind, only 51% of the populace pays income taxes today. When this percentage dips below 50%, the money will inevitably run out.

Not surprising, we now live in an era of two distinctly different interpretations of the American Dream, both of which are incompatible. Somehow, I am reminded of John Kennedy’s famous quote at his 1960 inauguration, “Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country.”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2012 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.


NEXT UP: 
A LITTLE SILLY – Why we need a light hearted distraction now and then.


Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, (12:30-3:00pm).

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »

TOO MANY CARPENTERS, NOT ENOUGH ARCHITECTS

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 10, 2012

BRYCE ON SYSTEMS

– And the role of programmers and systems analysts.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I have always admired the work of the carpenter. To watch a craftsman at work creating something is a delight. During High School I took a couple of wood shop classes which taught me the basics and gave me an appreciation for the skills required to create a wooden object of any merit. I have watched carpenters build houses, create impressive bookshelves and office libraries, carve baseball bats with lathes, and much more. Their attention to detail and ability to produce a quality product is truly inspiring, at least to me. In all cases though, they depend on a good set of plans or blueprints specifying the dimensions and materials to be used. Without them, the carpenter is lost. Even if they were to pursue their labor without such documentation, they would likely produce something that might be of interest to themselves personally, but useless for everyone else. This is why the architect or engineer is needed; to design and specify the product so the carpenter can work effectively. Whereas the carpenter works in the physical world, the architect works in the logical world where his/her ideas and designs are recorded on paper or in the computer.

Let me now describe a different set of carpenters and architects. Over the years, I have made extensive use of the carpenter/architect analogy in information systems design. I contend programmers are the carpenters of the industry and the architects are systems analysts. Like the carpenter, programmers live in the physical world and produce programs used in computers and telephones, in automobiles, in aircraft and ships, on the manufacturing floor, and many other places. Again, watching a programmer work according to a good set of blueprints is a delight. Unfortunately, we have built up a glut of programmers and diminished the role of the systems analyst almost to the point of extinction. This means fewer blueprints which leaves the programmer to guess what is to be produced. Instead of working by design, programmers work in accordance to “trial and error,” a very frustrating scenario for both the programmer and the end user (the customer). This is the reason why companies waste considerable time rewriting programs, a very costly proposition.

All businesses and organizations depend on enterprise-wide systems to produce timely information, but few truly understand the complete dimensions of their systems or how they work. Consequently, redundant work effort is common, there is data redundancy leading to erroneous or inconsistent decisions, programmers operate in a constant “firefighting” mode, users do not trust the information produced, and in general the company’s productivity suffers. All of this because companies have somehow convinced themselves they need more programmers and less systems analysts. Somehow I am reminded of the Bryce’s Law: “If we built bridges the same way we build systems in this country, this would be a nation run by ferryboats.”

There have been a multitude of tools and techniques introduced over the years to expedite programming; program generators, fourth generation languages, CASE tools, agile programming, cloud computing, and many more. Over time, such fads have come and gone, yet the problem persists. These tools might be nice, but they certainly cannot help the programmer if he/she doesn’t know what they are to produce. To illustrate, consider the nail gun as used by the carpenter, an extremely efficient means for shooting nails into wood, and much faster than using a simple hammer. It may be a great tool, but if the carpenter doesn’t know precisely what to build, it is useless. The same is true with these programming tools and techniques. If the programmer doesn’t know what they are to build, no amount of elegant technology will expedite the development of the product.

If companies are serious about improving programmer productivity, they would be wise to hire a few more architects. The reason for not doing so is rooted in management’s lack of appreciation for logical design. They can more easily assimilate programming which produces screens and reports they can physically touch and see, like an “app.” Logical design though is more nebulous to them; they typically do not comprehend such things as flowcharts or other such diagrams and believe progress is impeded by such work. Maybe the best way to teach them the necessity of systems analysis is to give them a nail gun and a stack of wood and tell them to build something out of it (without any blueprint of course). This should give them not only an appreciation for the necessity of the work of the systems analyst, but an understanding of how the programmer works as well.

“Good specifications will always improve programmer productivity far better than any programming tool or technique.”Bryce’s Law

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2012 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.


NEXT UP: 
WHAT IS THE AMERICAN DREAM? – Is it still “the land of freedom and opportunity”?


Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 12:30-3:00pm).

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Management, Systems | 5 Comments »

POLITICAL HYPNOSIS

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 7, 2012

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– How voters are really being persuaded to vote. 

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

If you have ever seen Alfred Hitchock’s 1960 movie, “Psycho,” you undoubtedly will remember the shower scene. What makes it legendary is not just the act of the woman’s murder (played by Janet Leigh), but how Hitchcock shot the scene which was about 30 different camera angles in 30 seconds. This, coupled with a soundtrack of screeching violins and other string instruments, made for a horrific montage of images in a short period of time. Hitchcock wasn’t simply trying to show how a murder was committed, he also wanted to impress upon the viewers the brutality of the crime. For this he was highly successful. The scene was considered so shocking at the time, that women across the country became reluctant to take showers after seeing the movie.  It left an indelible impression on a lot of people’s minds. Through film, Hitchcock had found a way to stimulate the minds of his viewers through a series of fast paced images as opposed to a lengthy narrative. There was no special message, just an image of horror.

 On a recent visit to the local cineplex I sat through several trailers for upcoming movies. These are, of course, short commercials that attempt to wet the appetite of the viewers to see a picture. If you study such previews carefully, the pace is rather fast and loaded with images aimed at triggering a response from the viewer’s brain. Curious, when I returned home I researched some of the latest trailers on the Internet to see how many images they processed.  Here’s what I found:

 “The Dark Knight” – 2:11 in length – 67 images – 1.95 seconds each

 “The Odd Life of Timothy Green” – 2:32 in length – 101 images – 1.5 seconds each

 “Hope Springs” – 2:34 in length – 112 images – 1.37 seconds each

 “Men in Black 3” – 1:56 in length – 69 images – 1.68 seconds each

 This means there is a lot of images for the mind to fully digest, too many in fact. To make it work, filmmakers have learned such previews have to have some form of continuity to it as opposed to a set of unrelated images, thereby creating a flutter effect in storytelling which, in essence, is no different than the several picture frames per second that goes into showing a movie. The brain processes the images without thinking of the differences between pictures. In the previews though, the intent is to communicate an image as Hitchock did. The trailer portrays a very sketchy storyline, but concentrates on such things as comedy versus drama, good versus evil, symbols and glimpses of popular movie stars. In the trailers, most scenes show movement of some kind through panning or zooming; very few have static images. This is done to focus the mind’s eye and keep the person moving from one image to the next. Continuity is enforced either by adding dramatic music and/or a deep voice saying, “In a world made up of…” or “For the adventure of a lifetime.”

As with Hitchock’s “Psycho,” movie trailers communicate to viewers by creating indelible impressions as opposed to a lengthy description. By doing so, they are creating a Pavolov’s dog effect to get the consumer to salivate on command.

Obviously, such tactics are not restricted to the movies and are an inherent part of television advertising as well, particularly in politics. Such commercials are not so much about communicating facts or the positions of a candidate as it is to create an impression in the voter’s brain. Ultimately, such tactics represent a recognition that voters are intellectually lazy and need to be coerced into formulating an opinion. This, of course, is a prime example of brainwashing. Campaigners recognized a long time ago that the lion’s share of voters base their decisions on images as opposed to issues and answers (sadly). Not surprising, political advertising is more about creating images as opposed to communicating any important policy or idea.

Next time you see a political advertisement on television or the Internet, consider the visual stimuli the producers are trying to invoke. Is it really trying to tell a message or conjur up an image with you? Did you really learn something or do you now have a fuzzy feeling that someone is good or bad? Actually, it is nothing but a form of hypnosis where you are being manipulated not by thoughts, but by impressions.

Just remember, “You are getting sleepy…”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2012 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  TOO MANY CARPENTERS, NOT ENOUGH ARCHITECTS – And the role of programmers and systems analysts.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays). 

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 5 Comments »

 
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