THE BRYCE IS RIGHT!

Software for the finest computer – the Mind

  • Tim’s YouTube Channel

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,066 other followers


  • "BRYCE's UNCOMMON SENSE SERIES"
    4 New Printed Books & eBooks from Tim on:
    Change/Technology, Management, Politics, and the American Scene
    Click HERE.

  • Categories

  • Fan Page

  • Since 1971:
    "Software for the finest computer - The Mind"

    Follow me on Twitter: @timbryce

    hit counter

     

  • Subscribe

Archive for May, 2013

ENTERPRISING PANHANDLER SIGNS

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 31, 2013

BRYCE ON ENTREPRENEURSHIP

– Some of the most creative signs used by beggars.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Every now and then you encounter a panhandler begging for money. This is starting to become commonplace here in Pinellas County, Florida along US-19 where beggars hold up signs at traffic intersections asking for money. The signs they hold typically convey the message, “Homeless and hungry. Please help. Thank you and God bless.” Motorists have mixed emotions about offering donations. Some happily offer their spare change, others roll up their windows and lock their doors in fear for their safety.

The beggars of Pinellas Country are neophytes when compared to New York panhandlers who have turned it from an art to a science. It was in New York where the idea of cleaning windshields first started. Most people gave the beggars money, not out of kindness, but to keep them away from their cars. In New York, the beggars realize a simple sign like, “Please Help,” no longer works. Instead, they have to have a gimmick, such as holding a door open at a public store, or perhaps they dress in flamboyant costumes to entertain the public. Most though, have developed some very creative signs which makes pedestrians either laugh or think. The beggars know very well, a clever sign means big bucks. Here are some of the most interesting signs I have encountered:

“Family kidnapped by Ninjas. Need $ for Karate lessons.” – This is the standard sign used to amuse pedestrians. There are slightly different variations of it out there, but this is the bread and butter of signs.

However, there are many other signs reflecting some real ingenuity:

“I slept with Lindsay Lohan last week – Please help.” – (Yes, please.)

“Blah, blah, blah…Money.
Blah, blah, blah…Food.
Blah, blah, blah…
Who Reads Signs Anyway?<
Anything helps. Thank you.”

– (I like guys who are honest and cut to the chase.)

“Too ugly to prostitute. Too stoopid to steal.” – (I saw this woman. She’s right.)

Here’s a few that I found rather clever and I suspect worked well for the panhandlers:

“Let’s do lunch. U-Buy.”

“I’ll bet you $1 you’ll read this sign.”

“I’m like Obama. I want change.”

“Bills larger than $50 will NOT be accepted after 9pm.”

“I’ll bet you can hit me with a quarter.”

“Desperate need for hair weave. Please help.”

“Will take verbal abuse for $1.00.”

“Need cash for alcohol research.”

I found these next two signs rather disturbing. Although they were trying to be humorous, I looked upon these people as deadbeats:

“16 Wives.
7 hungry dogs
3 thin cats.
25 kids and still horny.
Please help with loose change.”

“Too lazy to work. Too scared to steal. Please assist.”

You can see the influence of technology in these signs:

“Homeless + Hungry. God bless!!!!!
PayPal – 40dude@gmail.com”

“Will code HTML for food. Please help.”

“Will work for text messaging.”

“Replaced by CGI – please help” – (man dressed as a robot.)

“Time Traveler – Help! Need $ for New Flux Capacitor” – (I presume this is intended to appeal to fans of science fiction.)

In New York I found the panhandlers to be somewhat territorial in nature. They hustled for their preferred location and kept an eye open for anyone infringing on their territory. This final sign sums it up:

“If you don’t wanna spare me some change, at least don’t give any to the other Bums!”

It’s fascinating, even beggars appear to possess the American spirit of entrepreneurship.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  OFFICE NOISE – Can we focus in the workplace or is there too much ear pollution?

LAST TIME:  NAYSAYERS – Those who believe the glass is half empty.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Life, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

NAYSAYERS

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 29, 2013

BRYCE ON NEGATIVITY

– Those who believe the glass is half empty.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

It is one thing to offer wise counsel, it’s quite another to try and screw things up for others simply by being negative. I remember when I was a kid, there would be classmates who advised me that I shouldn’t take a particular class, that it was too difficult and I would fail. Interestingly, I didn’t. I also had friends tell me not to play football; that it would affect my grades and I would injure myself. Again, it didn’t; and I found it to be a very rewarding experience.

As I got into the workforce, I found even more naysayers who would tell me, “It cannot be done,” or “We’ve never done it that way before.” I’ve also seen this same phenomenon in several nonprofit organizations I have participated in. If I were to follow the advice of these naysayers, I would probably be still living at home with my parents sleeping in my crib.

Although I listen to the advice of the naysayers, it gets rather old after a while and a bit disconcerting. These are people who honestly believe the glass is half empty all of the time, and get visibly upset when you point out that the glass is actually half full. Their negativity can wear on a person over time. If you tell someone they cannot do something enough times, people start to believe it and act accordingly. Basically, naysayers want us to conform to their way of thinking, but by doing so, they are discouraging original thought and innovation which is a tragedy.

In a way, it reminds me of a chapter from Ayn Rand’s acclaimed novel, “The Fountainhead,” about a brilliant architect who dares to stand alone against the hostility of unimaginative conformists. In the book, Howard Roark, the protagonist, is brought up on charges of destroying a building he designed. In the courtroom, he offers an eloquent defense which ultimately leads to his vindication. Although space prohibits me from including his complete courtroom testimony here, the following passage sums up the problem with naysayers. In the courtroom, Roark explains to the jury…

“Throughout the centuries there were men who took first steps down new roads armed with nothing but their own vision. Their goals differed, but they all had this in common: that the step was first, the road new, the vision unborrowed, and the response they received–hatred. The great creators–the thinkers, the artists, the scientists, the inventors–stood alone against the men of their time. Every great new thought was opposed. Every great new invention was denounced. The first motor was considered foolish. The airplane was considered impossible. The power loom was considered vicious. Anesthesia was considered sinful. But the men of unborrowed vision went ahead. They fought, they suffered and they paid. But they won.”

In a strange way, naysayers are doing us all an important service; for every “problem” they identify, I see an “opportunity.” As I learned a long time ago, if I can think a problem through, I can do it.

I have advised my children that throughout life they will undoubtedly meet with naysayers who will take pleasure in chiding them as to what cannot be done. I thereby admonish them to prove them wrong and return the favor.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of  M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at  timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  ENTERPRISING PANHANDLER SIGNS – Some of the most creative signs used by beggars.

LAST TIME:  DEALING WITH STRESS – There sure seems to be a lot of people walking around uptight and find it difficult to relax.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Life, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

DEALING WITH STRESS

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 28, 2013

BRYCE ON THE HUMAN CONDITION

– There sure seems to be a lot of people walking around uptight and find it difficult to relax.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

There are a lot of things that causes stress in our lives, such as finances, our family relationships, our work, medical conditions, driving, sex, competition, politics and world events; and I guess this is something that hasn’t really changed over the years. However, there sure seems to be a lot of people consumed with stress these days and believe it to be a natural part of their lives. They walk around uptight all of the time and find it difficult to relax. Often times they complain about migraine headaches, ulcers, tightness in their backs, and other body ailments. If you were to touch them, they would probably jump out of their skin. A lot of the stress such people possess is self-imposed. Many fear making a mistake, which might lead to their demise or cause people to think less of them. Consequently, we are seeing a generation of uptight perfectionists emerge who sweat over innocuous detail. Such people tend to drive the rest of us crazy.

To relieve stress, most of us do some sort of physical therapy, talk to people, perhaps a change of scenery or a good stiff drink. Not to be outdone, the drug companies have invented a whole new generation of chill-pills to get people to calm down and cope with their lives. Years ago “downers” were considered illegal substances, but I guess you have to hand it to the drug companies to legitimize them. Such drugs have become so prevalent in society that you have to wonder how our grandparents and great-grandparents ever got along without them, but remarkably, they did.

Plain and simply, stress results from the fact that we are human-beings and, as such, we are imperfect creatures who make wrong or bad decisions during our lifetimes. People do not want to admit to making mistakes, but we do. We also wish we could turn the hands of time backwards and change things, but we cannot. It is convoluted thinking to become consumed by the mistakes we made in the past. We should, of course, learn from them, but we should always be looking forward as opposed to backward. Just remember, the last guy who was perfect, they hung on a cross.

Whether we like it or not, the sun will inevitably rise again tomorrow and we have to have the fortitude to deal with it. Yes, we will continue to screw up and make mistakes, but we have to pick ourselves back up, lick our wounds, and keep going forward. Perhaps the best way to cope with bedlam is to laugh now and then. I think my father put the best spin on it years ago when he said, “I don’t have ulcers, I give them.”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  NAYSAYERS – Those who believe the glass is half empty.

LAST TIME:  SOME THOUGHTS ON MEMORIAL DAY – It’s not about barbecues, auto racing, or the start of summer.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Life, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

SOME THOUGHTS ON MEMORIAL DAY

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 24, 2013

BRYCE ON THE MEANING OF THIS HOLIDAY

– It’s not about barbecues, auto racing, or the start of summer.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

On Monday we will commemorate Memorial Day, a custom in this country resulting from our Civil War where we honored the dead soldiers of both the North and the South. Originally, it was called “Decoration Day,” an expression older people would occasionally use as I remember from my youth. The intent was to honor the soldiers by decorating their graves either with small flags, flowers, or some other small tribute. Actually the custom of honoring deceased soldiers is an old one, going back to the Romans.

Today, Memorial Day is celebrated more as the start of summer vacation and the Indianapolis 500 as opposed to remembering the millions of soldiers who gave their lives in the service of their country which is rather disappointing. Fortunately, there are still people who commemorate the day with a small town parade or observe a military service at a nearby cemetery. Two of the most impressive services is at the Tomb of the Unknowns at the Arlington National Cemetery, and Gettysburg National Cemetery in Pennsylvania. You remember, the place where Lincoln delivered his famous address, “Four score and seven years ago…”

It’s the last paragraph of Lincoln’s address which defines the meaning of Memorial Day:

“But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us-that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion-that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain-that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

One custom commonly overlooked on Memorial Day is the display of the American flag. The proper etiquette is to raise it briskly to the top of the staff and then solemnly lower it to the half-staff position, where it remains until noon. It is then raised to full-staff for the rest of the day. Those of us with modest sized flags at home should simply display them proudly.

The one event I particularly enjoy is the National Memorial Day Concert in Washington, DC and televised on PBS. They do an admirable job of remembering our troops.

Let us never forget, Memorial Day is not about barbecues, auto racing, the end of the school year or the beginning of summer, it’s about honoring our fallen heroes.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  DEALING WITH STRESS – There sure seems to be a lot of people walking around uptight and find it difficult to relax.

LAST TIME:  HAS BASEBALL’S TIME PASSED? – It looks more like a three ring circus as opposed to a sporting venue.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Society | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

HAS BASEBALL’S TIME PASSED?

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 22, 2013

BRYCE ON THE NATIONAL PASTIME

– It looks more like a three ring circus as opposed to a sporting venue.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I recently had a friend make the observation that nobody goes to baseball stadiums to watch baseball anymore. He made this observation after attending a Spring Training game down here in Dunedin, Florida where the Toronto Blue Jays practice. Prior to the game he noticed all of the Canadians in attendance got up to proudly sing “Oh, Canada!” then settled in to watch and study the game. In contrast, the Americans gave a lethargic rendition of our national anthem, and then did everything but watch the game.

I have to admit, my friend had a point. When I go to see our home town Tampa Bay Rays, or my old team, the Cincinnati Reds, I am often distracted by the eye pollution, the people wandering around the stadium aimlessly, or partying at the many social venues they have. Last year, when I visited the Reds, a friend sprung for some rather expensive tickets featuring a restaurant venue where you could gorge yourself on all of the local cuisine if you were so inclined. Many people stayed inside the air conditioned clubhouse where they imbibed on cocktails. Television sets were laced throughout the clubhouse, but I didn’t see too many people watching them. As for me, I settled into my seat outside and watched the game.

I’m one of those guys who has always been a student of the game. When I go with my old high school buddies, we talk about such things as the positioning of the fielders, how their feet are placed, where and how the batter is standing in the batter’s box, the pitcher’s eyes and his motion to first base, and dozens of other nuances. We also talk about history, and who had what batting average. I’m not sure why I’m like this, maybe because I am an old Little League coach. Whatever the reason, I’m an anomaly as compared to the other people in attendance who need to be entertained. While others are downing all of the local delicacies, I’m happy with a beer and a simple bag of peanuts.

Sometimes I keep score of the game myself, an old habit I picked up while coaching. I do this more to study patterns, and see where the batters are likely to hit the ball. Most of the other people in the stands couldn’t care less. They are more concerned with getting a free T-shirt as shot out of an air cannon by the stadium crew.

To me, baseball is a great game, full of nuances, communications, and strategy, but I don’t believe Americans share the passion for it as they did years ago. To illustrate, membership in Little League has dropped 25% since 1996. Attendance at MLB games in the 21st century has been flat, which probably answers why ballparks have been turned into three ring circuses.

It is certainly not the national pastime anymore. What a shame. Then again, my friend who made the observation about baseball, also noted basketball has changed likewise. People go to games, pay hefty prices for tickets, and expect to be entertained as opposed to watching the game. Maybe they think of such venues as another form of “American Idol” or “Dancing with the Stars.”

Maybe I should just stick to watching Little League games or the Minor Leagues. They may not have all the glitz of the Majors, but they certainly try harder.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  SOME THOUGHTS ON MEMORIAL DAY – It’s not about barbecues, auto racing, or the start of summer.

LAST TIME:  THE DECLINE OF CRAFTSMANSHIP – They are getting harder and harder to find.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Baseball, Sports, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

THE DECLINE OF CRAFTSMANSHIP

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 20, 2013

BRYCE ON WORK ETHIC

– They are getting harder and harder to find.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I happened to visit my brother-in-law in Cincinnati not long ago. He is a master machinist in a machine-tool company up there. He gave me a tour of his company and it was interesting to see how he can take a block of aluminum and transform it into a high-precision instrument. He patiently explained the whole process to me and described the details for making such an instrument. His knowledge of the overall process along with the tools he used was very impressive. More importantly, he expressed his pride in his company and the products they produced. This was all very refreshing to me as you don’t hear too many people anymore who take pride in their work and know it thoroughly.

I think you can trace the decline of craftsmanship back to the 1980’s when the bean counters started slashing costs and programs aimed at the production of quality products. Fortunately, this didn’t happen at my brother-in-law’s company which is privately owned by a German immigrant who is also a craftsman and invests heavily in his people and research and development. The consciousness of the people in the plant is such that if the product isn’t just right, it is done over again. Interestingly, the company doesn’t have any problems in terms of morale, tardiness, or absenteeism. The older workers mentor the younger workers, and the employees in general relate to their work. In other words, management has created an environment of cooperation as opposed to competition, thereby allowing workers to focus on their work and take personal initiative to solve problems themselves. By doing so, the workers have been able to marry their personal and professional lives.

I found this all somewhat eerie and I felt I had been transported back in time to another era where workers were dedicated craftsman and genuinely cared about their work. We don’t see a lot of craftsmanship any more, particularly in I.T. departments who prefer “quick and dirty” solutions these days. I shouldn’t single out I.T. departments though as they are not alone in this regards. Just about everywhere you go, you don’t find too many people who understand the total process of building something and sweat over the details. Most people simply don’t care and disassociate their personal lives from their professional lives, …which I find rather sad.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  HAS BASEBALL’S TIME PASSED? – It looks more like a three ring circus as opposed to a sporting venue.

LAST TIME:  BRANDING THE MORAL VALUES OF CONSERVATIVES – How the media controls the image of conservatives.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

BRANDING THE MORAL VALUES OF CONSERVATIVES

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 17, 2013

BRYCE ON MORALITY & POLITICS

– How the media controls the image of conservatives.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Last month I was asked to give an overview of my new seminar “Stand Up for MORALITY” at a local Republican Club. This was a condensed version of my seminar where I discuss the properties of morality, describe how it applies to Americans, and have attendees work through problems. In case you’re wondering, this seminar is politically and religiously neutral. It just happened that the Republicans invited me in as do other groups. During the seminar, I asked the group to define some moral values that everyone could abide by, not just themselves. After much discussion, the group settled on the following:

Do unto others as you would have others do unto you.
Respect elders and those in superior position.
Adhere to the laws, rules and regulations of the land.
Help, aid, and assist all persons less fortunate, as I am able to.
Not wrong, cheat or defraud another.
Respect the property of others.
Work faithfully, professionally, and industriously for those employing my services.
Respect the dignity of the human spirit and treat people equitably.

They could have defined more, but we were limited by time. These responses are actually quite typical as many people in this country share these values. Knowing I was in the presence of a political group, I next asked them if these were the values the media used to portray the GOP, to which I received an emphatic, “No!” Instead, they felt the media slandered them by portraying them as:

Greedy; consumed more with the almighty dollar than people.
Insensitive to the needs of others.
Were environmentally reckless.
Possess radical views on gun control.
Racists.
Warmongers.
Unreasonably resists change.
Stuck in the past.
Inclined to create mayhem in order to overthrow the government.

There is something to be said in their argument. This particular presentation happened to occur during the week of the bombings at the Boston Marathon on Monday, April 15th. It wasn’t until Friday, the 19th, when the final suspect was apprehended. In the meantime, there was considerable speculation as to who the perpetrators were, particularly the media, to wit:

* Chris Matthews of MS-NBC blamed the “radical right” for the bombings.

* Lawrence O’Donnell, also of MS-NBC claimed the National Rifle Association (NRA) helped the bombers get away.

* Stephanie Johnson, a public affairs representative with the U.S. Forest Service blamed the Tea Party for the bombing.

Other liberals also made accusations that conservatives were behind the April 15th bombings. They were all undoubtedly surprised to learn the suspects, Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, were born in Russia, of Chechen descent, and believed in Islam. Although they had immigrated to the United States as children, and were permanent residents (only one of the brothers had become a naturalized citizen). In other words, the media was disappointed the attack was caused by outsiders as opposed to conservatives in this country.

Since the 2012 national election, the media has been insisting the GOP needs to change in order to attract voters of all nationalities. To do so, they suggest conservatives change their views on such things as marriage, immigration, the national debt, entitlements, etc. This would mean a dramatic change in their moral values as expressed earlier, something which is virtually difficult if not impossible for anyone to do. Knowing this, the media will likely continue to villify the character of conservatives thereby tainting their image to the public. I believe they now call this “branding” or perhaps “brainwashing” would be more appropriate.

Conservatives have only themselves to blame as they do not take the media to task over how they are portrayed. Instead, they need to take the argument directly to the public and explain precisely what their moral values are, and by doing so, the public may come to the realization that conservative values are no different than their own. For example:

Helping their neighbors.
An honest dollar for an honest day’s work.
The sanctity of life.
That a person must be given the opportunity to try their hand at any business venture they are so inclined.
That each person needs to lead an honorable and worthwhile life.

Unveiling the true moral values of conservatives could work wonders in terms of demystifying what they truly represent, something the media already knows and is desperate to refute. Frankly, conservatives are not nearly as frightening as they are portrayed by the press. Most probably have the same values as you do.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  THE DECLINE OF CRAFTSMANSHIP – They’re are getting harder and harder to find.

LAST TIME:  WHAT THE HECK ARE THEY TEACHING? – Politics in the classroom.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Morality, Politics, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

WHAT THE HECK ARE THEY TEACHING?

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 15, 2013

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– Politics in the classroom.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

As you know, I’ve been discussing issues pertaining to the development of moral values, specifically how they are taught and learned. In my writings, I observed that schools are no longer teaching religion or morality, but this is not entirely true as there is considerable political discourse being added to the student’s curriculum by the teachers. To illustrate:

Florida Atlantic Stomp on Jesus – (March 27th) – a Junior at Florida Atlantic University was suspended for refusing to stomp on a piece of paper with the word “Jesus” boldly printed on it. The incident was part of an exercise in a class for Intercultural Communications. The incident became so controversial and garnered so much exposure, Florida Governor Rick Scott made inquiries of the university’s chancellor. Whether the word had been “Jesus” or “Mohammad,” the exercise had questionable intent and, according to university officials, it will not be used again. Had the Junior not objected, the incident would have likely been buried and the instructor not suspended.

Wisconsin teen says teachers bullying him over conservative views – (March 28th) – An Appleton, Wisconsin high school freshman published a log of the bullying he received from his teachers for his conservative views. The log chronicled the verbal abuse he took from teachers over a three year period, at three different schools, starting in eighth grade. Whether the student is conservative or liberal is immaterial; no student should suffer such an embarrassment.

Texas prof. under fire for allegedly forcing students to make anti-gun posters – (April 10th) – an assistant professor teaching a Graphic Design course at Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas instructed her students to develop anti-gun posters as one of their assignments. Had the students been asked to choose either a pro-gun or anti-gun position, or the teacher not used the posters for political purposes, the problem would have likely not blossomed. Instead, a student filed a complaint with the university which began an investigation. Evidently, Texas law forbids professors from using their authority to compel others to advocate political causes,

Writing Assignment at Albany High School: Explain Why “Jews Are Evil” – (April 12th) – An unnamed Albany High School English teacher in New York, issued an assignment for the students to write an essay on why “Jews are evil.” A third of the class refused to comply and brought the matter before school officials. The teacher has since been placed on leave.

Dad Furious After Finding This Crayon-Written Paper in Florida 4th-Grader’s Backpack – (April 12th) – A mother and father in Jacksonville, Florida found a paper in their fourth-grader’s backpack. The paper, which had been written by their son in crayon as part of a class assignment, said, “I am willing to give up some of my constitutional rights in order to be safer or more secure.” The son and his classmates were instructed to write this expression by their teacher. The assignment infuriated the student’s father who quickly brought it to the attention of school officials.

It used to be, you would occasionally hear of a story where a teacher would openly discuss their personal political views, such as the North Carolina high school teacher who yelled at a student, telling him that he could be arrested for criticizing Barack Obama, but these seemed to be sporadic outbursts. Now, it seems reports of teachers promoting their political agendas has become more prevalent, such as these five stories within a 15 day period.

Back in my public High School days, the teachers never discussed politics, unless of course it was to describe the mechanics of politics in our Government classes. As students, we had our suspicions as to which teachers were liberal and conservative, but to their credit, they remained tight-lipped over politics. It’s evidently not this way anymore, as politics in the classroom has become more commonplace. As I mentioned in my eBook, “Stand Up for MORALITY,” the discussion of politics is a discussion of morality in disguise, which is normally frowned upon in this day and age of political correctness. For example, discussions about the federal debt, marriage, gun control, entitlements, etc. is not simply a political discussion; it is a moral discussion.

Having teachers preach their view of morality and politics places students in the awkward position of questioning the values possessed by their parents. Fearing for their grades, students are generally inhibited to stand up for their rights. Such fear is simply unacceptable. Those students who rose to refute their teachers have displayed great moral courage as they faced retribution.

I wonder how much of this could be avoided with just a little discipline, such as school uniforms (for both students and teachers alike), and a little respect for both sides. It’s a shame we cannot seem to discuss morality more openly and respectfully. Then again, someone always seems to have an agenda.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  BRANDING THE MORAL VALUES OF CONSERVATIVES – How the media controls the image of conservatives.

LAST TIME:  IN PRAISE OF SISTERS – The unique relationship between a brother and a sister.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Politics, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

IN PRAISE OF SISTERS

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 13, 2013

BRYCE ON BROTHER/SISTER RELATIONSHIPS

– The unique relationship between a brother and a sister.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Coming from a male dominated family, I missed out on having a sister. I always found the discourse of men and women to be rather interesting. They are entirely different. Men like to get to the point in their discussions, they enjoy a good joke, and like to BS about trivialities like sports and business. I find the banter of women to also be interesting yet substantially different than men. I think most like to size each other up and talk about family and events within their circle. Nonetheless, I find the talk between men and women to be substantially different than when they are amongst their own gender. They are either cordial, flirtatious, or candidly talk on the square, such as that between a brother and a sister. I have a son and daughter and have always admired their relationship as they tell each other things they wouldn’t normally tell their best friends or parents.

Although I never had an actual sister, I have been very fortunate to have three people I regard as sisters. Interestingly, two of them are named “Nancy,” one was a next-door neighbor I grew up with as a kid, and the other is someone I coached softball with years ago. The other is a sister-in-law whom I have known since High School. All three are down-to-earth people who I have enjoyed many a laugh and disagreement with over the years. More importantly, we have developed a rapport whereby we can talk candidly with each other. I respect their opinions and have often sought their advice on a variety of issues. We don’t see each other often, but when we talk, we simply pick up where we left off.

Although I enjoy their company and we have had our share of good times together, I think I appreciate their candor most of all. If I get off-track on something, they reel me in by speaking heart-to-heart with me. Their honesty is refreshing and something you don’t always hear among men. I suspect the same is true among women. We’ve discussed everything from raising families to our professional interests.

The discussions among husbands and wives is substantially different than between brothers and sisters. Whereas husbands and wives are trying to work together to make ends meet, brothers and sisters are more inclined to look at things from another perspective. My wife has a brother and I have observed how she talks to him is different than how she talks to her sisters. They laugh a lot, but they have also gone toe-to-toe on some issues. Regardless, they are blood and work out any differences that may surface.

Brother/Sister relationships are interesting. Although they are generally positive, there are instances where a feud can erupt, but this is not as common as Brother/Brother or Sister/Sister feuds. I think the difference of gender is the leveling factor.

For men, having a sister you can trust is very comforting. I hope women feel the same way. I just wish we had a Brother/Sister Day to remind us of how we value each other. We have holidays for just about everything else, but few are as important as the relationship between a brother and a sister.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  WHAT THE HECK ARE THEY TEACHING? – Politics in the classroom.

LAST TIME:  THE MORALITY PLEDGE – “And if I stumble, grant me the courage to ask for help.”

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Family, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

FOR MOTHER’S DAY

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 11, 2013

BRYCE ON MOTHERS DAY

– 12 things I’ve learned about mothers.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

* Mother’s spit has cured scratches, bruises and fixed millions of projects.

* Mothers sleep with their eyes half-open (they never stop worrying).

* Mothers dispense vitamin pills daily for their offspring, even when they’ve grown into adults.

* Mothers are always the last to sit down at the dinner table.

* The best ingredient in a meal prepared by a mother is her heart.

* Mothers always warn, “Be careful or you’ll put your eye out.”

* Mothers know where you hide things.

* Mothers keep your school work and anything you made for them when you were a child.

* Mothers know if you have been naughty or nice, not Santa.

* Mothers usually accept less so their children can have more.

* Mothers may not agree with you, but they will always listen.

* No matter how old you are, mothers smile at you as you leave home, but weep after you have left.

Have I forgotten anything?

Happy Mothers Day!

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Family, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

 
%d bloggers like this: