THE BRYCE IS RIGHT!

Software for the finest computer – the Mind

  • Tim’s YouTube Channel

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,106 other followers


  • "BRYCE's UNCOMMON SENSE SERIES"
    4 New Printed Books & eBooks from Tim on:
    Change/Technology, Management, Politics, and the American Scene
    Click HERE.

  • Categories

  • Fan Page

  • Since 1971:
    "Software for the finest computer - The Mind"

    Follow me on Twitter: @timbryce

    hit counter

     

  • Subscribe

Archive for November, 2013

Bryce: Republicans choosing sides in District 13 race

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 28, 2013

THIS WEEK’S COLUMN IN THE ST. PETERSBURG TRIBUNE – 11/28/2013

http://tbo.com/pinellas-county/bryce-republicans-choosing-sides-in-district-13-race-20131127/

Advertisements

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

A THANKSGIVING MOMENT

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 27, 2013

BRYCE ON THANKSGIVING

– A simple grace.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Some time ago, I wrote a simple grace for use at the Thanksgiving Day table. My aim was to stress the importance of the holiday and the people participating in our lives. It’s not very elaborate but it stresses the need to remember these precious moments. I hope you find it useful:

“Let us enjoy the moment, cherish the moment, remember the moment.

Let us first remember those moments where we shared many a story, a joke and debate, With those loved ones at this very table, those who have gone on before us, yet we fondly remember.

Let us now take a moment and make our own mental photograph of every person at this table, what was said, what we looked like, what we ate, and the love in our hearts.

Let us remember this moment, let us cherish this moment, let us give thanks to this moment, as time slips silently away.

Amen.”

Have a Happy Thanksgiving.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  MANAGING COMPLEXITY – Are we juggling too many balls?

LAST TIME:  UNDERSTANDING YOUR CRAFT – What is necessary to become a professional in your chosen field.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Lance Tormey & Brian Teegarden (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

UNDERSTANDING YOUR CRAFT

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 25, 2013

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

– What is necessary to become a professional in your chosen field.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I recently gave a talk to the local “Future Business Leaders of America,” a county-wide group aimed at preparing young people for the business world. Consequently, my talk was based on my book, “Morphing Into the Real World: The Handbook for entering the Work Force.” Although there were some younger students in attendance, the majority included High School Juniors and Seniors. Basically, I gave them a “fire and brimstone” talk on what to expect when they entered the workforce, both good and bad.

I didn’t pull any punches. We discussed the perils of micromanagement, adapting to the corporate culture, the need for corporate ethics, loyalty, teamwork, and much more. I also painted a picture of a highly competitive work place where workers need to stay on their toes at all times, and not go on automatic. This frank approach seemed to be appreciated and kept their attention.

Something I kept harping on was the need for developing a professional attitude. This is particularly needed so workers do not become complacent, and give them an edge in improving their career. Developing such an attitude, requires more than just becoming proficient in a new skill set, although it certainly wouldn’t hurt, but it requires understanding decorum, learning etiquette, and continuing education in their chosen field.

Graduating from school doesn’t mean you arrest the need to learn. In fact, formal education is intended to train your mind to learn. As such, your real education begins following the conclusion of school. In my presentation, I admonished the students to learn the history of their chosen field, so they have an understanding of how and why it evolved, and so they do not make the same mistakes their predecessors did.

To illustrate, I asked for a show of hands of the students interested in pursuing a career in computing. Six hands shot up. I then openly tested their knowledge by asking, “What is a 4GL (fourth generation language)?” I was answered by blank stares. They knew about HTML, and some coding, but were not intimate with programming. I proceeded to explain the differences between 1GL (machine language), 2GL (assembly language), 3GL (procedural languages such as COBOL), and 4GL (interpreters). Next, I asked if anyone knew the difference between the various DBMS models, e.g., Hierarchical, Network (CODASYL), Relational, and Object Oriented. Again, blank stares. I said, “It’s not important you know this yet, but I want to challenge you to understand the nature of the industry you are embarking on, whether it is computing or some other field. Thereby, you won’t make the same mistakes your elders made.”

As an aside, a few years ago I wrote, “A Short History of Systems Development”, which discusses these items.

Becoming a true professional in any field requires more than just a good set of clothes, it requires a sincere effort to improve one’s self, both physically and intellectually. It means you are ready to put your school days behind you, act more responsibly, and develop an intellectual curiosity. It’s call “maturity.”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  A THANKSGIVING MOMENT – A simple grace.

LAST TIME:  THE JFK ASSASSINATION: AN EPOCH EVENT – Where were you in 1963?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Lance Tormey & Brian Teegarden (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Business, Education, Management | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

Bryce: Pinellas school suspensions drop, but we can do better

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 23, 2013

THIS WEEK’S COLUMN IN THE ST. PETERSBURG TRIBUNE – 11/23/2013

http://tbo.com/pinellas-county/bryce-pinellas-school-suspensions-drop-but-we-can-do-better-20131122/

Posted in Education | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

THE JFK ASSASSINATION: AN EPOCH EVENT

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 22, 2013

BRYCE ON A NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY

– Where were you in 1963?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

There have been a handful of epoch events over the years which have left indelible impressions on us. Momentous events where we clearly remember where we were on that date and what we were doing. For my grandparents, it was the end of World War I. As for my parents, it was Pearl Harbor. Other generations remember Neil Armstrong setting foot on the moon, the Challenger Disaster, and of course 9-11.

As for me, it was the day President Kennedy was assassinated. At the time, I was in third grade in Norwalk, Connecticut, a public school. We had finished lunch and were now in Mr. Hamilton’s Social Studies class where we were learning about Ferdinand Magellan. Mr. Hamilton was a new teacher, one of only a few black teachers we had at the time. We were always impressed by how well he dressed, his articulate speech, and his care about his students.

During the middle of the class, our principal, Mr. Kelly, made an announcement over the intercom that all teachers were to assemble in the hallway. Mr. Hamilton seemed surprised, but asked us to continue reading while he stepped outside. He was out for only five minutes where the principal spoke quietly with the teachers. When Mr. Hamilton returned his face was ashen and distressed. He fumbled for words, which was uncharacteristic of him. He said, “Children, we have just heard a report that President Kennedy has been shot in Dallas. We don’t know the extent of the damage yet, but it sounds bad. I would ask that we take a few minutes and pray for the President.”

And we prayed. Even though it was a public school, I didn’t hear anyone complain. We had never been asked to pray before, but it became apparent something extraordinary was going on. Mr. Hamilton tried to continue teaching, but we could tell his thoughts were elsewhere. After a short while, Mr. Kelly asked the teachers to reassemble in the hallway. Shortly thereafter, Mr. Hamilton returned with instructions from the principal. He began by saying the president had died. He didn’t want to belabor the point, probably because he didn’t know much more than we did, plus the school felt this was something for the parents to explain. He went on to say that we were being dismissed early, and that calls were being made to parents to pick up children. He asked that we remain calm, quietly put things away and leave. We did as we were instructed and remained quiet until we got outside where we looked at each other blankly, not knowing what to think.

I raced home on my bike and ran into the house. “Mom, Mom, did you hear…?” She heard. Both my Mom and her girlfriend from next door were glued to the television, mesmerized. My brother, who had stayed home that day due to a bad cold, was also watching. My father came home early from Manhattan after learning of the news.

For the next few days, we were all transfixed on the television set, morning until night, something highly unusual for that time. Yes, we saw Jack Ruby shoot Lee Harvey Oswald live on TV, and we watched the final procession to Arlington Cemetery.

This was an event which seemed to shock everybody evenly, both Democrats and Republicans. My parents had not voted for JFK, but they were very much disheartened by his assassination. This was a period when we had respect for the office of the president. As far as my parents were concerned, this was not an attack on a political party or ideology. This was an attack on the United States. The families in my neighborhood all seemed to share this view.

JFK’s assassination was a major milestone in my life. It’s been 50 years since then, and I remember it like it was yesterday. Even now, when I see images of it on television, I remember Mr. Hamilton.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  UNDERSTANDING YOUR CRAFT – What is necessary to become a professional in your chosen field.

LAST TIME:  MOVING DAY – It can either be a painful or enjoyable experience. It’s what you make of it.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Lance Tormey & Brian Teegarden (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

MOVING DAY

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 20, 2013

BRYCE ON MOVING

– It can either be a painful or enjoyable experience. It’s what you make of it.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I have been involved with several moves over the years. We moved our household seven times, primarily because my father was a pioneer in computing. As kids, we had to learn the nuances of different schools and had to make new friends with every stop. Some people may object to being bounced around so much, but in hindsight, I enjoyed meeting many people and experiencing local customs. I am still in touch with friends from these different places.

Professionally, we moved our office four times. First, we needed to expand our facilities, then we had to downsize. Whereas our software ran on mainframes, and we had printing presses to print voluminous manuals and forms, this all disappeared with the Personal Computer, hence the need to downsize.

Making a move can be a very traumatic experience. Some people dread the thought of moving, others look forward to it as it represents a change in their lives. Fortunately, I’ve been through it enough times that it doesn’t bother me too much. It’s not that a relish moving, I do not, but I simply resign myself to the necessity of it and put my best foot forward.

Perhaps the hardest part of moving is the preparation, something we are intimate with due to our many moves. In our latest move, we had to dispose of a lot of clutter we had been saving. Decades of old reports and manuals finally found their way to the public dump. In cleaning out the flotsam and jetsam, you find yourself saying, “Why in the heck were we keeping this?” (or perhaps something a little stronger).

After the initial purge, you try to sell furniture and items you no longer need or use, usually through a garage sale or, as in our case, an open house. The problem with selling such items is you have become emotionally attached to them as they invoke specific memories. Consequently, you hesitate to part with them. True, I develop such attachments myself, but I am also cognizant of the fact that everything eventually ends up in the public dump.

Following this, you have one more purge of leftover materials before packing the rest up for storage or the dumpster. Herein is perhaps the hardest part of the move, where you have to finally address the fate of the last few items you have developed attachments to. I am still leery of storing something I know I will never use again, so I am careful of what I keep.

The closing of the sale is nothing compared to the physical move. If you’ve got the patience for moving, it’s not too bad. If not, you better adjust your attitude before things get worse. I also suggest you pace yourself. When the decision to move has been made, put the plan in motion and keep pushing ahead. Do not wait until the last moment as you do not want to go into a panic mode.

After the dust has settled and you have moved into your new facilities, you can slow down and relax. This is also when the flotsam and jetsam starts to grow again.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  RECOGNITION – Are we giving awards to the wrong people?

LAST TIME:  UNDERSTANDING THE PECKING ORDER – Do you know your place?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Lance Tormey & Brian Teegarden (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Business, Management, Society | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

UNDERSTANDING THE PECKING ORDER

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 18, 2013

BRYCE ON SOCIETY

– Do you know your place?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

You would be hard pressed to find an institution that does not have a “pecking order” delineating authority through superior and subordinate relationships. The order ultimately dictates the authority we assume and our duties and responsibilities. Companies, both large and small, have some form of hierarchy with a leader at the top and the workers underneath. Nonprofit organizations also have such an order, be it a religious institution, fraternal order, homeowners association, sports club, a charity, or whatever. Any formal organization incorporated under the state requires certain positions, such as a president, vice president, etc., thereby suggesting a chain of command. Informal groups will also have a pecking order, including gangs and organized crime. Such orders are a natural part of life and we should all be cognizant of our position.

Although job descriptions typically define the pecking order in any corporation, there are other attributes delineating relationships, such as seniority and skill level. Whereas seniority is based on tenure at work, skill sets distinguish people by proficiency, e.g., expert versus novice. In other words, we have learned to respect the wisdom and experience of our elders, that they may know something we do not, along with the talents and abilities of people. However, years of service is not always a good yardstick for measuring competency, which explains why we also consider skill levels.

In schools, the pecking order is typically defined by grade level, e.g., senior, junior, sophomore, freshman. However, this may vary as defined by the maturity and capabilities of the student. For example, I have seen freshman step up to leadership roles in school clubs and sports. In the absence of a qualified senior leader, leadership defaults to the person who steps up and is willing to assume responsibility. The same is true in just about every other organization and it is referred to as “personal initiative.”

In families, the pecking order starts with the parents and typically works down the line of children by age. Again, if a child shows signs of particular skills or initiative, and an elder child does not, it is possible for the younger child to climb the pecking order. In the absence of parents, who are unavailable to exert leadership, children will supersede the authority of the adult and establish their own rules and make their own decisions, a rather unhealthy situation, yet a reality in today’s world.

Man is a social animal and, depending on the situation, is always looking to exert his will over others, usually for his own personal benefit. The idea everyone in a body of people is equal is simply ludicrous, at least for administrative purposes. There always has to be a leader, someone in a position of authority who assumes responsibility to establish and enforce rules of conduct and make ultimate decisions, if for no other reason than to break ties. Without it, there is chaos.

As a member of any institution, you would be wise to know your place in the pecking order and, in order to maintain harmony, do not try to break it unless necessity calls on you to do so.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  MOVING DAY – It can either be a painful or enjoyable experience. It’s what you make of it.

LAST TIME:  HAS TECHNOLOGY TRULY IMPROVED OUR LIVES? – Ever wonder about the cost of technology?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Lance Tormey & Brian Teegarden (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Business, Management, Social Issues, Society | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

HAS TECHNOLOGY TRULY IMPROVED OUR LIVES?

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 15, 2013

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Ever wonder about the cost of technology?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Has technology truly improved the quality of life? It is hard to say as many companies do not take the time to measure the variables involved, such as economics. Such analysis is normally documented as a Cost/Benefit Analysis, complete with break even points and return on investment. Although we would like to believe technology enhances productivity and profits, there is little or no data to substantiate it.

In recent years, we have seen technology enhance our powers of communication, transportation, sales, design, manufacturing and materials management, health management, wage war, and more. We have also seen changes in our culture as a result, such as personality changes, modification of our thinking patterns and values, language, and interpersonal relations. Technology enhancements come at a cost, and not just economical in nature. This is one reason why it is difficult to quantify how technology improves our lives.

To illustrate how technology affects us, imagine fighting a war today with weapons from World War II, e.g., ships, planes, tanks, and guns. We would look primitive by comparison, even to a third world country. Wanting to understand the differences between then and now, I made a comparison between tanks and fighter aircraft:

TANKS

 

M4 SHERMAN

M1 ABRAMS

INCREASE

Operational Range

120 miles

265 miles

+221%

Speed

30 mph

42 mph

+140%

Armament

75mm + X

105mm + X

+300%

Unit cost

$.4655M (2012)

$ 33.5K (1942)

$8.58M (2012)

+1,843%

For its time, the Sherman was a very cost effective solution. The unit cost back then was $33.5K which, when converted to 2012 dollars, comes to $.4655M, much cheaper than the Abrams which costs $8.5M per unit, an astounding increase. True, the Abrams can go farther and faster than the Sherman, not to mention superior armament. Nonetheless, the Sherman was a bargain by comparison and lasted a long time.

FIGHTER AIRCRAFT

 

 

P-51 MUSTANG

F-16 F.FALCON

INCREASE

Maximum speed

437mph

1,320 (Mach 2)

+302%

Armament

Guns + X

Guns, Mis, Bombs

+300%

Unit cost

$.459M (1998)

$ 50.9K (1945)

$14.6M (1998)

+3,180%

The P-51 Mustang was the sleek super fighter used in the closing years of WW2, the Korean War, and other conflicts. As a propeller plane though, jet fighters eventually forced its retirement. Aside from jets though, there was nothing to catch it and it was instrumental in bringing the war in Europe to a close. Regardless, it pales in comparison to the aircraft of today, such as the well known F-16 Flying Falcon, which could go three times faster and includes a diverse assortment of armaments, much more than the P-51. The drawback to the F-16 though was its unit cost, which was three times greater than the Mustang. Driving the cost was a quantum leap in complexity, requiring a higher level of sophistication to manage the technology.

I also considered the impact of technology on entertainment, particularly motion pictures. 1939 is considered by many to be the best year in terms of attendance, and outstanding movies produced by the studios, such as “Gone with the Wind,” “It’s a Wonderful Life,” “The Wizard of Oz,” “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” “Goodbye, Mr. Chips,” “Ninotchka,” “Love Affair,” and “Stagecoach.” In studying the budget costs for these films, I found they cost on the average $1,889,297 to make in 1939 dollars ($30.8M in today’s dollars).

I then studied the budget costs for the top movies thus far in 2013, including, “Iron Man 3,” “Despicable Me 2,” “Fast & Furious 6,” “Monsters University,” “Man of Steel,” “The Croods,” “World War Z,” and “Oz the Great and Powerful.”

On the average, the movies this year cost $175M each, more than five times the pictures in 1939. Today’s movies all use color, enhanced audio, and all used computer generated graphics. Many were animated films. In contrast, most of the movies in 1939 were black and white (except “Gone with the Wind” and “The Wizard of Oz”) and relied on story-lines, dialog, and acting.

MOTION PICTURE BUDGETS:
1939 – $ 30,822,495
2013 – $175,000,000 (+567.8%)

Here again, we see a tradeoff: today’s movies may visually be better “eye candy” with enhanced audio, but they have sacrificed plots, scripts and acting in the process. Studios now are more inclined to trust the programmer’s hand as opposed to the craftsmanship of the actor, actress, or writer.

In studying the numbers, it appears to double the productivity of something, you need to increase unit costs by at least tenfold, a disturbing figure encouraging inflation. This would suggest for every technology enhancement, the cost of living goes up, not down.

More importantly, with every technology improvement, our culture seems to change, particularly our ability to socialize. It affects our language, our work habits, our priorities, and our perspective on life. Such is the true cost of technology.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  UNDERSTANDING THE PECKING ORDER – Do you know your place?

LAST TIME:  STRANGE BEDFELLOWS: POLITICS AND SOCIAL MEDIA – If you are in the public eye, become proficient in how to use such facilities.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Lance Tormey & Brian Teegarden (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Technology | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

STRANGE BEDFELLOWS: POLITICS AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 13, 2013

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– If you are in the public eye, become proficient in how to use such facilities.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

As most of us know, to get our message out to the public, there is nothing easier to use than social media. Services such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Instagram, et al, have made it incredibly easy to disseminate text, graphics, videos, audio, or just about any other computer file. It is now the vehicle of choice to reach friends, family, customers, and news outlets. Whereas a 24 hour cycle was required to distribute news, now it is done around the clock and reaching a global audience.

Whereas many people have a cavalier attitude towards what they post on the Internet, and let the chips fall where they may, if you are in the public eye, you have to be extremely careful what you say and do. Case in point, the recent Dan Tucker incident here in Pinellas County. Dan is a local Republican Committeeman, an unpaid volunteer position. His job is basically to help Republicans get elected and recruit new members for the party. As such, he has no real power in party politics. He just assists any way he can.

In September, Pinellas County Commissioner John Morroni (a Republican) endorsed a Democrat for St. Petersburg City Council. In response, Tucker posted an unfortunate comment about Morroni’s health on Facebook, “Doesn’t he have cancer of the brain … hmmm?”, a reference to Morroni’s battle with lymphoma which is now in remission. The comment went viral and Tucker was openly chastised for making such a comment. The media picked up on the story thereby adding fuel to the fire.

Recognizing he had made a mistake, Tucker personally called Morroni and apologized and reported it on his Facebook page. Regardless, the attacks on Tucker became so voluminous, he suspended his Facebook page and is now careful who he talks to.

As Tucker learned the hard way, if you are in the public eye, you cannot afford to make a slip of the tongue. Social media may be a great way to disseminate news and information, but it is also a convenient means to shove your foot in your mouth. We have all said things we wish we could retract, including yours truly, but that is not easily done. If you’re an average Joe, you may not be overly concerned with what you say, but if you are in the public eye, you unfortunately have to be politically correct.

Even though Tucker was called upon to resign his position by his own party, he refused, and frankly I do not blame him as I believe this has been blown out of proportion. Did Tucker commit murder, mayhem, physically attack someone, abscond with party funds, caught in a sexual tryst, or some other felony? Heck, he didn’t even jaywalk. He made a slip of the tongue which he corrected by apology. Yet, a firestorm of protest ensued with people calling for his head. What is the old saying, “Let he who is without sin…”? As an aside, Tucker claims he received over a hundred messages, from both parties, NOT to resign.

If you are in the public eye, read your messages twice and think about them before posting. Look for grammar too as you will be judged not just by what you said, but how you said it. Next, learn how to delete a posting. True, someone may spot it before you can retrieve it, but make an effort to delete comments if they are wrong. Social media typically has functions to moderate comments on your web page; use them. Your social media page is YOUR page, not someone else’s. As such, police it accordingly. If someone persists in posting rude comments, block them as their comments will inevitably discourage others from following you. Finally, if you have made a mistake, fess up to it and offer an apology, and be sure to explain it on your social media page. It’s not foolproof, but your critics will be forced to pull their punches if they know you have made a sincere apology.

One last note, if you are attacked with nasty or vulgar comments, do not respond in kind. Resist the temptation and do not stoop to the other person’s level. Let them look like the classless fool that they are, but not you. Simply delete the comment and block the person from your group. Also, avoid correspondence with people who have an anonymous identity. It is always wise to know who you are conversing with.

In Tucker’s case, he was attacked more for political purposes than what he actually said. He simply left himself exposed and allowed his detractors to hit him square on the chin. All thanks to the power of social media.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  HAS TECHNOLOGY TRULY IMPROVED OUR LIVES? – Ever wonder about the cost of technology?

LAST TIME:  ARE YOU ENGAGED IN WORK? – Understanding the difference between “jobs” and “careers.”

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Lance Tormey & Brian Teegarden (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics, Social Issues, Technology | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

ARE YOU ENGAGED IN WORK?

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 11, 2013

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

– Understanding the difference between “jobs” and “careers.”

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Last month, the Gallup organization produced a report entitled, “State of the Global Workplace: Employee Engagement Insights for Business Leaders Worldwide,” a rather lengthy name making a simple point: People are lazy. It goes on to admonish corporate management to change tactics in order to engage workers thereby improving productivity (and the GDP overall). The report studies the work habits of 142 countries and is produced every other year, the last one being in 2010.

According to the report, only 13% of the world’s workforce is “engaged” in their work, meaning they are happy, find their work meaningful, and are productive. 24% are “actively disengaged,” meaning they are employed but are negative about their work. Finally, 63% are “not engaged” in any form of organized work. This means approximately one out of eight people are ultimately supporting the rest, a rather dismal figure, and equates into 180 million people in the countries studied.

The report paints a rather bleak picture and hints as to why the world economy is not growing as it should be. In a nutshell, workers are psychologically depressed causing them to give up and are no longer actively looking for work. This means they are content to become wards of the state which implies we are all becoming third world countries dependent on others for handouts.

Interestingly, Canada and the United States are the most “engaged” at 29% which is somewhat surprising when you consider how we have struggled economically over the last five years. Western Europe was only 14% “engaged” which is surprising as you consider Germany, Austria, and Switzerland are powerhouses today. However, they are mixed in with Greece, Portugal, Spain, Ireland, and France who are struggling, thereby bringing the number down. Surprisingly, the least “engaged” area was East Asia at a measly 6%. This includes China, South Korea, and Japan who are typically viewed as workhorses. The number though hints of the economic decline in the area.

I have always been a big believer of the dignity of work, whatever form it takes. Ideally, we all want a “career” where we can make a difference and do something meaningful and worthwhile, but we do not always have such a luxury. Most of us have to settle for a “job” which may pay the bills, but we treat as mundane as we consider it beneath us. This difference between a “job” and a “career” is considerable. One offers mobility and allows us to apply our skills anywhere, the other does not. We are proud to be one, but not necessarily the other. And finally, one means workers are “engaged,” and the other we are “actively disengaged.” As an aside, you do not get “stuck” in a career.

Regardless of whether you have a job or a career, I admonish you to take on a professional attitude at work. It is always a pleasure to watch a secretary, custodian, clerk, waiter/waitress, customer services rep, mechanic, carpenter, bricklayer, barber, cook, salesman, or whatever do their job with precision and professionalism. It means they possess personal confidence and pride in workmanship.

As I said, I believe in the dignity of work. It is what distinguishes ants from grasshoppers.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  STRANGE BEDFELLOWS: POLITICS AND SOCIAL MEDIA – If you are in the public eye, become proficient in how to use such facilities.

LAST TIME:  THE GOLDEN AGE OF CHILDREN’S TV – What shaped the Baby Boomers?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Lance Tormey & Brian Teegarden (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Business, Management | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
%d bloggers like this: