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Archive for April, 2014

INTERPRETING “MARRIAGE”

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 30, 2014

BRYCE ON SOCIETY

– Why true Christians disagree with same-sex marriages.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Same-sex marriage was back in the news recently. In January, “Duck Dynasty” star Phil Robertson made his views on homosexuality known in an interview for GQ Magazine, resulting in a temporary suspension from A&E executives. Earlier this month, Brendan Eich, was forced to step down as CEO of Mozilla for supporting California’s Proposition 8 to ban same-sex marriage. Prior to this, such admissions were considered harmless until 2012 when President Obama endorsed same-sex marriage, thereby politicizing it.

The gay community cannot comprehend why anyone would not endorse their position and are ready to pounce on those opposing it, regardless of their religious convictions. By doing so, they have put gay rights on a collision course with religion via the Constitution, specifically the First Amendment addressing freedom of speech and religion.

In the Christian world, practitioners view marriage as a sacrament, a religious ceremony used as a sign of divine grace. It is based on the teachings of Jesus Christ and the Apostle Paul:

* “man to leave his father and mother and cleave to his wife, and the two shall become one,” (Gen. 2:24)

* “So that they are no more two, but one flesh. What therefore God hath joined together, let not man put asunder.” (Matthew 19:6).

Thus, marriage bestows the sanctity of the joining in the eyes of the Lord and their families who consent to the coupling for propagation purposes. From a purely biological perspective, this makes sense as homosexual couples obviously cannot reproduce. I cannot speak for other religions, but I cannot imagine a true Christian who doesn’t accept this position. It is simply unfathomable to them and an affront to their sensibilities. Because of this, Christians have difficulty applying the word “marriage” to homosexual couples. Perhaps another word is in order, such as “union,” “partnership” or whatever, a label which would not offend the senses of Christians. Same-sex marriage advocates obviously will disagree over this interpretation, contending only love is necessary to form a marriage.

Attacking Christians for possessing their beliefs is obviously an affront to the First Amendment by denying religious freedom. Further, the 14th Amendment guarantees religious civil rights:

“Section 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.”

This guarantees “equal protection of the laws” for every person, including religious civil rights. Frankly, I’m surprised people such as Phil Robertson have not invoked the 14th Amendment to defend themselves.

As long as there are people who consider marriage a religious institution, the concept of same-sex marriage will remain abhorrent, and disagreements will perpetuate. If you consider it something else, such as a political or social concept, you will have no trouble accepting it. Unless the government negates religious freedom, the followers of Jesus Christ will continue to resist it, and strong disagreements will continue unabated in the same vein as abortion.

The media has taken same-sex marriage to new levels of political correctness, thereby manipulating public opinion. The growing acceptance of it is indicative of the decline of religion in this country. Regardless of what you call it, to Christians it is not “marriage.”

We must then ask what is the real issue here, marriage or the right to transfer property and benefits to another person legally? I suspect the latter. Surely legislation can be written to provide for legal partners of gay couples. Christian America should have no problem with providing for the rights of all of its citizens. They may not agree with their lifestyle and consider it unnatural, but the gay community is not going away anytime soon. The biggest problem for Christians is simply the distortion of the meaning of “marriage.”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  CELEBRATING THE MONTH OF MAY – One of my favorite months of the year.

LAST TIME:  FAREWELL SNOWBIRDS  – We hope you enjoyed your stay, but it is time to go home.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 17 Comments »

FAREWELL SNOWBIRDS

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 28, 2014

BRYCE ON SOCIETY

– We hope you enjoyed your stay, but it is time to go home.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Well, it’s that time of year again. Of course I’m talking about the migratory return of the snowbirds from Florida to their northern roosts. Actually, they began to return by the end of March, just as the Major League Baseball season was beginning, but it is now time to gently nudge the remaining folks out of their nests and back home. It’s almost May for God’s sake!

On behalf of the 19.5 million residents of the Sunshine State, I want to thank the +90 million tourists who visited us (yes, it is that much) and pumped over $60 billion into our economy. Thank you. We appreciate your visit. However, it is now time to return home so we can reclaim our highways, restaurants, ball parks, golf courses, parks and beaches. We enjoyed your visit but we now need to stretch out and rest before you return in the fall.

So, au revoir “The Land of Lincoln,” “The Hoosier State,” “The Empire State,” “The Garden State,” “The Buckeye State,” “The Great Lakes State,” “The Land of a Thousand Lakes,” and “Old Dominion.” And let us not forget our Canadian friends from Ontario (“Yours to Discover”) and Nova Scotia (“Canada’s Ocean Playground”). We will miss your dialects and erratic driving habits, not to mention your mammoth RV’s hogging grocery store parking lots, but do come back.

We may not have understood what you were saying, the clothes you wore, or your northern idiosyncrasies, but we tried to accommodate you the best we could, and hope you enjoyed your stay.

So, farewell our beloved snowbirds. Go in peace. See you in November. Bring lots of money with you.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  INTERPRETING “MARRIAGE” – Why true Christians disagree with same-sex marriages.

LAST TIME:  PRIVACY  – Some tips on dealing with loud and annoying people.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »

PRIVACY

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 25, 2014

BRYCE ON SOCIETY

– Some tips on dealing with loud and annoying people.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

When I first went to Japan, I found it fascinating how so many people could get along in a small amount of space. For example, if you take the subway in Tokyo during rush hour, you better not be claustrophobic, as people are jammed in with you any way they can. Fortunately, I’m tall enough where I can keep my head above the fray and get some fresh air, but down below are Japanese pushed into my navel (and just about everywhere else). Remarkably, as close as the quarters are on the subway, the Japanese try to respect the privacy of the people surrounding them. I’ve always admired the Japanese for this; quite simply, there is great respect for the concern of others. Because of the small amount of available space, I guess they really have no alternative.

Contrast this attitude though to the United States where we have a heck of a lot more space, but we still have areas where people live in close quarters, such as apartment buildings and condominium complexes. I recently had a reader complain to me about a neighbor in her apartment building who was causing a lot of trouble for the residents there, whereby he would be loud, knock on doors in the middle of the night to wake people up, and generally be an all-around nuisance. They tried to talk to him, but he disregarded their complaints and continues on his war path. My reader asked me what she should do about the situation.

First, you have to recognize you are dealing with someone who is either immature or socially dysfunctional, and such people can be dangerous as they have no concern for anyone else but themselves, the absolute antithesis of the Japanese culture. Second, find out the rules pertaining to your apartment complex as written and attached to the lease or contract, perhaps some governing documents. If such rules and regulations do not exist, look up local government ordinances. Next, register a written complaint with the proper authorities; in fact, get as many people as possible to sign the complaint with you which adds more credibility to your argument. Although you may want to take your complaint to your landlord, in all likelihood, he will not care. From his perspective, an obnoxious tenant that pays his rent on time is better than a quiet, empty apartment for lease. In other words, you will have to register your complaint with law enforcement officials.

When your complaint is officially registered and the person is notified, he will either be forced to conform or may become more belligerent. Now is the time to keep a journal of any other incidents that may arise, including pictures or audio if pertinent. Hopefully, the situation will go away, but it may also erupt on a grander scale, whereby you end up in court or be forced to move yourself.

Such a situation is unimaginable in Japan. The neighbors would talk to the person who, in turn, would become embarrassed and comply in order to maintain harmony and not to lose face. However, in the “home of the free,” such a talk would only make the problem worse, not better.

There are of course other alternatives, such as a baseball bat persuader, or hire Nunzio “Three fingers” to have a little “chat” with the problem child, but it is probably best to try legal alternatives first. Then again, you could move to Japan, if you don’t mind being squashed into a subway car.

Originally published: 4/21/2014

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  FAREWELL SNOWBIRDS – We hope you enjoyed your stay, but it is time to go home.

LAST TIME:  MORE EVIDENCE OF TECHNOLOGY ADDICTION  – Some new evidence revealing the legitimacy of the concept, and its effects.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

MORE EVIDENCE OF TECHNOLOGY ADDICTION

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 23, 2014

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Some new evidence revealing the legitimacy of the concept, and its effects.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I have been writing about the addictive properties of technology for several years now, even going so far as to label it a drug. Although several people have congratulated me on my essays, there are still people who are skeptical and reluctant to admit excessive use of technology can lead to an addition, particularly young people. Recently, more evidence has surfaced in the press describing the effects of excessive use of technology.

An interesting study, “Patterns of Mobile Device Use by Caregivers and Children During Meals in Fast Food Restaurants,” was published in the March 10, 2014 issue of “PEDIATRICS,” the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. The study concludes excessive use of smart phones causes parents and caregivers to become more irritable and less patient with their children; specifically, “Highly absorbed caregivers often responded harshly to child misbehavior.” This obviously notes how technology alters personalities.

Aside from mental changes, other physical changes have surfaced. In the March 1, 2014 issue of Africa’s “The Standard Group,” a report was published noting the development of “Tech Ring,” a line around the neck and chin caused from looking down at smart phones and computers. Take a good luck around at your colleagues at work. Don’t be surprised if you see it.

In India, the public is being warned of new ill effects resulting from smart phones, specifically excessive use of technology leading to sleep deficiencies, thereby causing anxieties which leads to problems in interpersonal relationships, particularly within families. Even sex lives are impacted through the distraction of smart phones.

There are other studies recently produced suggesting smart phone ring tones and text messaging beeps are creating a Pavlov’s Dog effect by owners. Whenever an audio response is given, it triggers changes in the brain. More on this will be reported soon.

The proliferation of smart phone photography has led to the popular “selfies” whereby people take pictures of themselves. Scientists now believe this is leading to mental health conditions focusing on a person’s obsession with looks. Consequently, this leads to narcissism.

As to pure addiction though, South Korea’s Ministry of Science is the latest to report on a survey of the country’s teenagers and found one in four (25%) to be addicted. Middle school children topped the list at nearly 30%. Let’s be clear, this is not about ownership or proficiency in the use of technology, it is about addiction in the same vein as drug addiction. The people cannot function without it.

These reports suggest our technology addiction is real and is altering people mentally and physically. Both parents and children must be made aware of the dangers involved and use such technology more judiciously. Some businesses are now encouraging workers to take a break from their technology during the day in order to refresh themselves and refocus. Web sites such as, “Tech Timeout,” have been established to provide awareness and guidance in dealing with technology addiction. While there, be sure to “Take the Pledge.”

Keep the Faith!

For additional information, here is a listing of my articles regarding Technology Addiction:

Our Smartphone Addiction – Sep 13, 2013

Is Personal Technology a Drug? – Dec 19, 2011

How Technology Affects Our Youth – Dec 05, 2011

Texting and Common Courtesy – Jul 25, 2011

The Cell Phone Pledge – Dec 03, 2010

The Digital Pandemic – Mar 17, 2010

The Absence of Electronics – Jun 30, 2009

The Adverse Effects of Technology – Jul 09, 2007

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  PRIVACY – Some tips on dealing with loud and annoying people.

LAST TIME:  HOW DO WE BUILD GREAT MANAGERS?  – Companies are “penny wise, pound foolish” in training managers.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Technology | 7 Comments »

HOW DO WE BUILD GREAT MANAGERS?

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 21, 2014

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

– Companies are “penny wise, pound foolish” in training managers.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Last month, the Gallup organization published a study entitled, “Why Great Managers Are So Rare.” In it, they describe how companies consistently fail to choose the right person to serve as manager a whopping 82% of the time. Their criteria was primarily based on the manager’s ability to properly motivate, inspire and direct the workers. Such ineffective managers provides the rationale as to why only 13% of the work force is truly engaged in their work; see “State of the Global Workplace.” In the same study, 30% of American employees were found to be truly engaged, which is a little higher but certainly not inspiring.

The Gallup study points out only one in ten people possess the necessary talent to manage, and herein is the Achilles’ Heal for business, providing suitable training to manage people. Managers are either hired from outside of the company or promoted from within. I have a friend who was a master machinist. He was so good, his boss promoted him to to supervise six other people. Unfortunately, he didn’t have the right people skills and he developed ulcers as a result of worrying about his responsibilities. After only a month, he begged his boss to return him to being a machinist. To his credit, he recognized his limitations. Unfortunately, too many people do not. Unfortunately, this scenario is commonplace in the business world.

In the area of Information Technology (I.T.), too often I have seen the following career path: Junior Programmer -> Senior Programmer -> Analyst -> Supervisor -> Manager -> Director. Because the person came from a technical background, he only thinks in terms of “zeros and ones,” not in terms of people and business. The point is, companies tend to pay more to develop technical skills as opposed to management skills. This inevitably produces the dismal results as reported by Gallup.

Outsiders applying for management jobs present a bigger challenge, such as substantiating their skills and experiences. Whereas internal people are easier to observe and quantify their effectiveness, it is more difficult to substantiate the outsider’s claims. Most companies refuse to discuss the performance of their employees either while employed or afterwards. This is done to prevent lawsuits. Consequently, it makes it almost impossible to confirm or refute an applicant’s claims of success. When interviewing management candidates, it should be more important to determine the person’s performance and style of management as opposed to how he/she will adapt to the corporate culture.

Instead of being measured by how they get along with everybody, managers should be measured by results, or as Gallup suggests profitability, productivity, and quality defects. According to the Gallup report, the great managers have the following talents:

“- They motivate every single employee to take action and engage employees with a compelling mission and vision.

– They have the assertiveness to drive outcomes and the ability to overcome adversity and resistance.

– They create a culture of clear accountability.

– They build relationships that create trust, open dialogue, and full transparency.

– They make decisions based on productivity, not politics.”

This suggests managers have to be more in tune with people skills as opposed to technology. It also means managers should possess knowledge of the various aspects of the work product involved, be intimate with oral and written communications, competent in team building, and should be versed in such things as negotiation, interviewing, conducting meetings, and familiar with such management concepts as leadership, accountability, corporate culture, and the various styles of management, e.g., Theories X, Y, and Z. Had my machinist friend been properly trained, he wouldn’t have developed ulcers, and I suspect we would have more effective managers in companies who can “truly engage” workers.

Gallup’s study reinforces the Bryce’s Law, “We accomplish projects through people.” To do so, executives must see the wisdom in investing in their managers, not just their workers.

This is why we have always described our work as, “Software for the finest computer – the Mind.” In the end, it is the human being that is of paramount importance, not technology.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  MORE EVIDENCE OF TECHNOLOGY ADDICTION – Some new evidence revealing the legitimacy of the concept, and its effects.

LAST TIME:  REMEMBERING THE DOOLITTLE RAID  – 72 years ago, American flyers dropped bombs on Japan as retribution for Pearl Harbor.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Business, Management | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

REMEMBERING THE DOOLITTLE RAID

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 18, 2014

BRYCE ON HISTORY

– 72 years ago, American flyers dropped bombs on Japan as retribution for Pearl Harbor.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)

To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

April 18th represents the anniversary of many key events in history; in 1906 it marked the destructive San Francisco earthquake and fire, Yankee Stadium opened in 1923 (“The House that Ruth Built”), in 1943 Japanese Admiral Yamamoto was shot down by American flyers over Bougainville, and in 1983 a suicide bomber destroyed the American embassy in Beirut, killing 63 people. To me though, April 18th primarily means one thing, the 1942 Doolittle Raid on Japan.

72 years ago today, Lieutenant Colonel James “Jimmy” Doolittle of the U.S. Army Air Forces (USAAF, the precursor to the U.S. Air Force), led an attack on industrial targets in Japan as retribution for the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, just over four months earlier. Considering the state of our military at the time, it is amazing America was able to pull together this response in such a short period of time. Make no mistake though, this was done more for rallying the spirit of America as opposed to making a strategic knockout punch.

My fascination with the raid began as a young man, when I purchased the book, “Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo,” by Captain Ted W. Lawson (1943). This is the first book I purchased at my grammar school book fair. Like a lot of youths of the period, the early 1960’s, I wrote a book report on it. In 1944, the book was followed by a movie of the same name, starring Spencer Tracy and Van Johnson.

From the book, I developed a fascination with the B-25 “Mitchell” representing the sixteen aircraft used in the raid. It remains my favorite medium bomber from that era. Interestingly, it was named after General Billy Mitchell, a hero of mine who was an early pioneer of “air power.” As an aside, it was Mitchell who predicted the attack on Hawaii a full 17 years before it happened. Mitchell also foresaw the need for medium and heavy bombers.

I will not try to explain the story of the raid herein as it has already been well told in both print and film. Suffice it to say it was an imaginative and courageous effort to strike back at the Japanese war machine. The raiders were escorted to Japan aboard the USS Hornet, which they launched from when they got within range of Japan, a daring feat as bombers had never before flown off an aircraft carrier. The raiders carried out their bombing run on various targets in and around Tokyo, before making their escape to China (one group made it to the USSR where they were imprisoned for a year). Two groups were captured by the Japanese, with three men being tried for military crimes and executed, the others were imprisoned in a Japanese POW camp for over three years. A few perished as they tried to land in China, but most made their escape thanks to the Chinese. Because of this, the Japanese killed approximately 250,000 Chinese for assisting the Americans.

Of the 80 men participating in the raid, only four survive to date, one of which is approaching 99 years of age (Richard “Dick” Cole). Over the years, the raiders held many reunions. Following the war, the citizens of Tucson, Arizona made a presentation of 80 sterling goblets to the group so the raiders could toast each other, both living and passed. A bottle of cognac accompanies the goblets for the last two remaining raiders to open and enjoy. The raiders no longer hold reunions as they have become old and frail, and the goblets are now maintained at the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs.

As an aside, there is now an effort underway to award the Congressional Gold Medal to the raiders before the last few pass away. For information, see “The Doolittle Tokyo Raiders.” The group needs your support.

Following Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt was looking for a way to lift the morale of the American people. He also wanted to send a message to the Japanese people that they were not as invulnerable as their government would have them believe. Navy Captain Francis Low, the Assistant Chief of Staff for anti-submarine warfare, was credited with the idea for launching bombers off of aircraft carriers. The plan was developed and implemented by Colonel Doolittle, a well known and respected aviator prior to the war.

The mission was bold, imaginative, inspirational, and achieved its goals. The raid caused nominal material destruction on Japan, nothing like the extensive daylight and evening bombings of Europe. However, it achieved the psychological objectives Roosevelt was hoping for, such as lifting the spirits of Americans while planting the seeds of doubt in the Japanese.

I write about the Doolittle Raid for two reasons: as a history lesson for our youth, and to remind us that we could use such ingenuity and courage today.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  HOW DO WE BUILD GREAT MANAGERS? – Companies are “penny wise, pound foolish” in training managers.

LAST TIME:  CONSERVATIVE STEREOTYPES  – Some sleight of hand to vilify conservatives.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in History | Tagged: , , , , | 10 Comments »

CONSERVATIVE STEREOTYPES

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 16, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– Some sleight of hand to vilify conservatives.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Following the release of one of my more politically inclined columns, I was accused by a reader of being an ultra conservative. The reader based his comments on established stereotypes of conservatives which I personally find distasteful. Such images have become rather old and tiresome, but were still effective in the last presidential election. These stereotypes were concocted by the Media over time and inevitably raise their ugly heads during election time. What concerns me though is these images are simply fallacious and aimed at misleading people away from the true issues at hand. Let me give you some prime examples of conservative stereotypes:

CONSERVATIVES ARE PRO-BUSINESS, EVEN AT THE EXPENSE OF SQUASHING ANYTHING THAT GETS IN THEIR WAY, INCLUDING THE LITTLE GUY.
I think it is no secret that conservatives believe in the free enterprise system, the land of opportunity, and an honest day’s wage for an honest day’s work, but I do not believe they are as ruthless as they are portrayed. They are unapologetic capitalists who want less government control, not more. Conservatives tend to see government as the servant of the people, not the other way around. This drives people crazy who oppose this way of thinking, particularly socialists and communists. It’s no small wonder that capitalists are portrayed as “fat-cats” who profit off the worker.

The reality is you will find just as many liberals in the board room as you will find conservatives. Further, anyone who has faced the realities and risks of starting up his/her own company, particularly a small business, is somewhat inclined to appreciate capitalist principles.

CONSERVATIVES DO NOT SHARE AND WANT TO CREATE A MASTER/SLAVE CLASS SOCIETY.
This is just plain bunk. First, greed knows no political ideologue. Second, we’re back to the capitalist argument whereby conservatives appreciate hard work and reward accordingly. Look, it’s simple, you cannot do everything yourself; you have to delegate, empower, and support your people, which includes compensating them accordingly. It’s just plain smart business. Third, conservatives give generously of themselves for a wide variety of causes. Although they balk at turning their wallets completely over to the government, conservatives gladly lend a helping hand to those who truly need it. Liberals certainly do not hold a monopoly on charitable causes.

CONSERVATIVES ARE ANTI-ENVIRONMENT.
It is generally believed that if you are a conservative, you have a fundamental disregard for the planet; that you want to rape the Earth and eradicate its resources. My question is, “Why?” This would imply that conservatives are like some visitors from outer space here to plunder the earth’s resources and leave a dead shell. I’m afraid I haven’t seen the conservative flying saucer yet, and I think we are all stuck on this planet together. In fact, conservatives have found such things as conservation, recycling, and land reclamation are not just good ideas, it’s smart business.

CONSERVATIVES ARE ULTRA RELIGIOUS.
Show me a fanatical Bible thumper and I’ll show you a conservative; Right? Wrong. I can’t begin to tell you how many liberals I have met through organized religion. We often hear of the “Religious Right” which primarily consists of Christian groups, but I don’t recall where it is written that a belief in Jesus Christ is a prerequisite for becoming a conservative. In fact, I’ve met conservatives from just about every religious faith imaginable. I will grant that conservatives tend to derive their core values from their religious beliefs, whatever they may be, but they are certainly not religious fanatics.

There is an interesting dichotomy here: whereas conservatives are accused of unethical behavior in business and the environment, they are also portrayed as religious zealots. I guess the assumption here is that organized religion doesn’t promote ethical behavior.

CONSERVATIVES ARE UNEDUCATED, UNIMAGINATIVE, AND ONLY FOLLOW PARTY LINES.
There is a general belief conservatives are incapable of intelligent discourse, are crude and lack creativity, and thereby must be told what to do. Gee, it kind of sounds like the goons in the Nazi Party under Adolph Hitler doesn’t it?

The notion conservatives are old-fashioned fuddy-duddies who resist change is erroneous. I know a lot of liberals who have been unbending in their ideas since the 1960’s.

Since conservatives tend to have a business perspective they are somewhat inclined to be freethinkers, meaning if it makes sense to them, they’ll buy it, regardless of who sells it. They will also make it plain if they do not agree with you, and perhaps this is what bothers their opposition. In fact, I find conservatives to be more open to debate; for example, consider the popularity of conservative talk radio programs (you don’t see too many liberal programs do you?)

CONSERVATIVES DO NOT HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR.
For a long time, conservatives have had to endure all kinds of jokes as communicated through political bumper stickers, cartoons, and late night comedians. In the process I think they have developed some rather thick skin and do, in fact, appreciate a good joke, although I admit their humor is not as destructive as others. But what is good for the goose should be good for the gander. Try poking fun at a liberal and you are accused of blasphemy. Now that’s funny.

CONSERVATIVES ARE RACISTS.
I’m not even going to dignify this with a rebuttal. Pure bunk.

CONSERVATIVES ARE ANTI-WOMEN
(See “Conservatives are racists”).

CONCLUSION

The concept of conservative stereotypes is nothing more than brainwashing for the purpose of social engineering by the media. Young people are taught early on that being a conservative is not “cool”…

“Did you know he is a conservative?”

“Really? He’s one of them? Wow! That’s lame.”

Behind the facade of the conservative stereotypes is a deeply-rooted resentment to capitalism, which the conservatives embrace. Anti-capitalists want to replace the system and evenly spread the wealth regardless of how much effort a person exerts to earn it. To conservatives, capitalism is the stimulus that encourages people to become entrepreneurs; to move forward and take risks, to boldly go where no one has gone before, to evolve, and hopefully succeed.

Like I said earlier, I have been accused of being an “ultra” conservative. As an aside, a friend recently pointed out to me, how come we do not apply this adjective to liberals (an “ultra” liberal)? I guess it is another attempt to stereotype conservatives as extremists (and liberals are not?).

It has been my experience that conservatives take their fiduciary responsibilities seriously, they are not afraid to be held accountable for their actions, they want to lead a worthy and meaningful life, and possess an ethical makeup derived from their religious beliefs. If this is what an “ultra” conservative is, then I plead, “Guilty. Most guilty.”

“Show me a young Conservative and I’ll show you someone with no heart.
Show me an old Liberal and I’ll show you someone with no brains.”

– Winston Churchill

Originally published: 3/2/2009

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  REMEMBERING THE DOOLITTLE RAID – 72 years ago, American flyers dropped bombs on Japan as retribution for Pearl Harbor.

LAST TIME:  STREAMING TV: THE NEXT GENERATION  – Like it or not, Streaming TV is here to stay.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »

STREAMING TV: THE NEXT GENERATION

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 14, 2014

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Like it or not, Streaming TV is here to stay.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Prior to the advent of cable-TV, we were all at the mercy of the programming of the Big 3 networks, ABC, CBS, and NBC. The viewer quickly became familiar with their scheduling. It was simple and you knew when everything was on. For example, Friday nights were boxing and wrestling, Saturday nights were movies, Sunday nights were Ed Sullivan, Bonanza, and Disney, etc. It was rather easy to figure out. Cable-TV came along in the 1970’s and added several channels, such as HBO, Cinemax, Showtime, The Movie Channel, etc. These channels quickly reproduced and multiplied into dozens of additional channels. Many other networks were introduced and propagated accordingly. So much so, the simple “TV Guide” was essentially replaced by monstrous programming schedules shown on the screen. At the same time, we went through a plethora of video players, such as Beta, VHS, DVD’s, and Blu-ray, providing us with additional content for us to chose from.

Streaming technology is the latest twist and it’s arrival inevitable. People want instant access to their favorite shows and movies, so they can watch them any time and any place, without having to purchase the latest media hardware. Now we are being inundated with choices and frankly, a lot of people are intimidated by the technology, particularly older people who are not imbued with smart phones and the Internet. Actually, the technology is not as imposing as it may seem. It just requires a little patience to learn it.

I got involved with the Roku Streaming Player not long ago. It requires Wi-Fi support, and an HDMI port, which is now standard on High Definition Televisions (HDTV). A remote control is included to navigate the many channels available, such as Netflix, Amazon, Hulu Plus, HBO GO, Pandora, Acorn (for lovers of British TV), and many others. Each has considerable content for you to wade through.

I also tried Google’s ChromeCast which also requires an HDMI port and Wi-Fi support. Unlike Roku, it requires computer input as opposed to a remote control unit. ChromeCast also includes such channels as Netflix, YouTube, HBO GO, Hulu Plus, Pandora, etc. From my observation, it doesn’t have as much content as Roku yet, but is has more than enough to entertain you and keep you busy.

Other streaming players are doubtless in the offing. All that seems to be needed is an HDMI port, Wi-Fi support, and access to the various networks which, I must point out, requires subscriptions for a fee.

These devices bring to the table a huge repository of programming, be it movies, television, sporting events (both past and present), and you can watch it at your convenience, not a set time. You can either select from different categories, such as Drama, Comedy, Action, etc. or search for a particular title yourself. For classic movie or television buffs, be forewarned, I had trouble finding anything of substance from the 1960’s or earlier.

Now, with such streaming devices, there are so many choices, it takes a long time to find something to watch. Many shows are either of no interest to me due to a variety of reasons, or I’ve seen them before. The search for a suitable program can become laborious and frustrating, particularly when you keep striking out with the search routines provided by the networks, and herein is the Achilles’ Heal of these services. The content is so massive, you will inevitably find yourself wasting considerable time trying to find something to watch. If you happen to know the title of the program, great. If not, forget it. It would be nice if the search engines would allow you to search by keyword, actor, director, studio, or year made. Better yet, establish “Junk” parameters for browsing the various categories. For example, I am not a fan of actor Adam Sandler, therefore I wish I could block the listing of his films, thereby expediting my browsing. Perhaps I want to search by a specific year or range of years, which would certainly speed things up. This has more to do with the networks as opposed to devices like Roku and ChromeCast. Whatever network finds a better way of searching or browsing through their content, will likely dominate the field.

Streaming TV is here to stay. Forget about your tape decks and DVD players; they have gone the way of “rabbit ears,” UHF antennas, and television sign-offs at 1:00pm. You will have to pay a little more for your television pleasure, and it will seem a lot more complicated, but this is the future of television, like it not. For those of you who can remember the early days of television, you will undoubtedly miss the simplicity of three network programming, and how inexpensive television used to be (free). Such is the price of progress.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  CONSERVATIVE STEREOTYPES – Some sleight of hand to vilify conservatives.

LAST TIME:  RENTAL PROPERTIES  – It’s like a boat; the best two days are when you buy one, and when you sell it.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Technology | Tagged: , , , , , | 7 Comments »

RENTAL PROPERTIES

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 11, 2014

BRYCE ON INVESTMENTS

– It’s like a boat; the best two days are when you buy one, and when you sell it.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

In these troubled economic times we’re always looking for a way to make a little extra cash. To this end, many people like to purchase buildings, condos or apartments and then rent them out. This type of investment is appealing for several reasons:

* It represents an asset you can possibly sell at a future date, hopefully for a profit.
* It’s also a handy tax write-off, particularly the interest on a mortgage.
* And it is a seemingly steady cash flow that can hopefully pay off the investment over time.

From a purely economic viewpoint, renting sounds like a great idea that can possibly give you a better return on investment than what a lot of the financial institutions are offering. If we lived in a perfect world, everything would be rosy and you would have a cash machine chugging away night and day, but unfortunately such is not the case. In reality, there are a lot of headaches associated with rental property. The first thing you have to realize is that the rental property does not run itself. You need people to market it, maintain it, and to live in it. This translates into real estate agents, homeowner associations, maintenance vendors, and renters. In other words, your troubles are only beginning.

Homeowner or condo associations typically watch your every move and are eager to cite you for the slightest violation of the rules. They are also not bashful when it comes to presenting you with bills for dues or some other innocuous improvement to the common areas of the property (which, of course, you were never consulted on).

Building repairs is an ongoing problem as something will inevitably go wrong at the worst possible time, such as when you are miles away on vacation somewhere. Air conditioners, refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers, etc. all have an uncanny knack for breaking down, even if you have a maintenance contract with someone. Then there is the problem of repairing the roof or parking lot every few years, representing a tidy outlay of money.

But perhaps the biggest problem is the renter, the tenant who leases the property. Typically, the relationship between landlord and tenant is either very good or very bad, rarely is it in-between. The person who pays his/her rent on time, is not a deadbeat, and takes reasonable care of the property is becoming few and far between. Most assume no responsibility for the property, live like slobs, and expect the landlord to be on-call 24/7 even for a problem the tenant created. True, there are also slum lords who neglect their responsibilities, but renters can be equally irresponsible as well. Then there is the problem of evicting a deadbeat tenant which involves a long and nasty legal process. Hopefully, the tenant will not seriously damage the property or remove appliances during the eviction process.

With all of this in mind, I am seeing more and more people shy away from investing in rental properties. In a way, I guess a rental property is a lot like a boat whereby the best two days are when you buy it and when you sell it. When you compare the headaches associated with being a landlord to other types of investments, maybe that low interest Certificate of Deposit doesn’t look too bad after all.

Originally Published: 04/17/2009

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  STREAMING TV: THE NEXT GENERATION – Like it or not, Streaming TV is here to stay.

LAST TIME:  HOW LIBERALS AND CONSERVATIVES PERCEIVE THE PEOPLE  – Our perceptions dictate not only how we will manage workers, but how we want to govern the people.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

HOW LIBERALS AND CONSERVATIVES PERCEIVE THE PEOPLE

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 9, 2014

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– Our perceptions dictate not only how we will manage workers, but how we want to govern the people.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I have described the differences between liberals and conservatives on more than one occasion. More recently, I examined their personalities, but herein I want to discuss their perspectives of the American people.

In the business world, one of the elements used to determine our style of management is how we perceive our workers, such as their strengths and weaknesses, their ability to assume responsibility, and their intelligence level. If managers perceive workers as lazy and unintelligent, they will likely chose a “Theory X” form of management, representing autocratic rule and considerable micromanagement. The byproduct of this “top-down” form of management promotes a slave mentality in workers. However, if they perceive workers as intelligent and responsible, they are more likely to implement a “Theory Y or Z” management philosophy, e.g., empower the workers, and turn them loose with minimal supervision. This “bottom-up” approach provides more freedom for workers, and encourages teamwork and personal initiative. This distinction is true in the political world as well.

Liberals tend to look upon the people as unintelligent and lazy, requiring someone to chaperone and think for them. In this way, they want to govern in the manner of a parent to its children, e.g., the parent knows what is best, the parent makes all the decisions, the parent watches the child’s every move, the parent dictates how the child must think. This is “Theory X” behavior in its robust form.

There is an element of truth that certain people behave like cattle and need to be herded accordingly. These are people who shirk responsibility and are content to be nothing more than wards of the state. The vast majority of the American people are intelligent, assume responsibility for their actions and want to think for themselves. These are people who embrace the concept of capitalism as opposed to socialism.

Conservatives believe in the rights of the individual, that each person must accept a certain amount of risk in their lives whereby they might succeed or fail. All they want is a chance, and not be encumbered by too much management or bureaucracy. This again is analogous to “Theory Y or Z” whereby the people are empowered and turned loose with minimal supervision.

It all comes down to simple human perspective. From it, our political ideology is formed just as our style of management is formed from observing our workers. Those who comfortably behave like sheep will gladly accept the liberal agenda, while responsible workers who are freethinking will accept the conservative agenda.

So, should people be able to roam on their own, or do they have to be herded? Your answer will dictate your political ideology.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  RENTAL PROPERTIES – It’s like a boat; the best two days are when you buy one, and when you sell it.

LAST TIME:  BUILDING TEAM MORALE THROUGH LEADERSHIP  – How a classic World War II movie teaches the basic lessons of leadership.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 9 Comments »

 
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