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Archive for February, 2016

FATHERS EAT HEELS

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 5, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– and perform all the thankless jobs around the house.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I was making a sandwich the other day, and as I opened a loaf of bread I observed the heel customarily unclaimed by other members of the family. I, of course, took it to build my sandwich. Only then did I stop to think how many times I had done this over the years as my family seems to have an aversion to eating the heel and, consequently, it was always earmarked for my consumption exclusively. It’s not that I relish eating the heel, I just don’t want to see it go to waste. I then started to think about the other attributes that distinguish fathers. For example:

It is the father’s job to kill spiders, bugs, and any other potential vermin frightening the household. In Florida, this includes man-eating grasshoppers, ants, armadillos, opossums, snakes, palmetto bugs (what we call cockroaches in the South), and the rare alligator that may wander by the house.

It is the father’s job to take out the trash, not just the regular kitchen garbage but virtually anything that can be shoved into, on top of, or next to a trash can. This includes items from the attic, bio-hazardous material stored in the garage, and anything that can be hacked off on the property. When the receptacles are full, it is the father’s job to somehow transport it to a dumping station, usually in the cleanest car available.

It is the father’s job to mow the lawn. More than mere mowing, this includes edging, hedging, pruning, sodding, raking, fertilizing, and blowing debris off the property. Hopefully the father is assisted by his offspring, but most find it an imposition for the child and therefore pays for Mexican laborers to perform the task instead.

It is the father’s job to change the oil and wash the car. I don’t mean running down to a car wash or quick-lube either. Every father should know how to use a hose and bucket of suds, not to mention wax. Further, they should be able to change the oil, miss the pan, and cleanup the slop spilled on the driveway. Hopefully the father is assisted by his offspring, but most find it an imposition for the child and therefore pays for Mexican laborers to perform the task instead.

It is the father’s job to eat leftovers and anything else the family refuses to consume. This distorts his palate which explains why fathers have a passion for such things as lima beans, Brussels sprouts, artichoke hearts, rutabaga, lamb shanks, liver and onions, black eyed peas and collard greens, grits, tapioca pudding, Rhubarb Pie, and Bosco.

It is the father’s job to help the children with their homework when they hit a problem. It is also his job to look as helplessly puzzled when he doesn’t know the answer (or understand the question).

It is the father’s job to make simple house repairs, such as changing the garbage disposal, fixing the toilet, repairing the door bell, or electrocuting himself when he should have called an electrician.

It is the father’s job to be the computer technician of the house, to hook up wires and strings, to buy and replace printer cartridges, and to curse Microsoft.

It is the father’s job to take the blame for whatever goes wrong, large or small, regardless if he is at fault or not, pick up the pieces and try to mend things.

It’s not easy being a father. We get all the dirty little jobs to do, and the leftovers to eat. We only ask for a little love and attention in return.

Just remember, fathers eat heels.

Originally published: December 16, 2010

Also published with News Talk Florida.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  MOVING UP TOO FAST – What happens when you do not pay your dues.

LAST TIME:  FINDING THE TIME AS MANAGER  – Embrace your workers, do not avoid them.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific); and WWBA-AM (News Talk Florida 820). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

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Posted in Family, Life | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

FINDING THE TIME AS MANAGER

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 3, 2016

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

– Embrace your workers, do not avoid them.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

As you probably know, I am not an advocate of micromanagement, a Theory X form of management featuring autocratic rule. I tend to subscribe to Theory Y where you “manage from the bottom up,” meaning a manager should train and empower his/her people to perform project tasks, and get out of their way. However, the manager should run interference for his people to overcome problem areas, real or potential. From the sound of this scenario, the manager spends little time with their people. Not quite. It is true they will manage more and supervise less, but they should always be cognizant of the needs of their people.

I knew a Chief Information Officer (CIO) for a Fortune 500 conglomerate who spent the bulk of his time away from the office, attending a multitude of meetings, either with the executive board, visiting the company’s many offices, or attending industry conferences where he often gave speeches. Although he had a mobile phone, the best way to contact him was either by e-mail or through his secretary who tracked his whereabouts.

His subordinate managers rarely knew where he was, and desperately wanted more face time to address some of the problems arising in the organization. Without the guidance of the CIO, they were forced to second guess how to best solve problems, usually wrong. This forced the managers to form an alliance to mutually solve problems, an unintended benefit resulting from the CIO’s absence. Aside from this, the managers and his workers felt abandoned and became apathetic.

One of the objectives of any manager is to “do yourself out of a job,” meaning to train your people to be able to take over the organization in the event the head manager is disabled or unavailable. If the department can run smoothly without him, he has done his job. Actually, this approach is derived from the military where it has long been the practice to prepare subordinates for advancement in times of crisis. However, to make this work, the subordinates must be properly trained. Unfortunately, many managers overlook this little detail and, consequently, the subordinates flounder.

Aside from this, the manager’s main attention should be focused on their people. Knowing corporate direction and planning is one thing, but it is imperative managers understand the problems and needs of their people. This means attending meetings, one-on-ones, keeping tabs on the pulse of their departments, status reports, brainstorming sessions, etc. As the captain of his ship, the manager should understand the direction of his department and make sure the crew has all the tools and instruction necessary to competently sail the ship.

In the example of the CIO mentioned earlier, most of the workers had no clue as to what the manager was thinking or what was expected of them. Consequently, they worked independently, certainly not in a concerted manner. In other words, the crew was not rowing on the same oar.

Just a little time socializing with your workers, remembering their names and important dates, such as birthdays and anniversaries, can work wonders in terms of improving morale. Sorry, but tweets, e-mails, and text messages will not suffice. Find the time to meet with your people, even if its nothing more than walking the trenches and checking progress first hand. As the leader of your area, it sends a powerful message that you care. Bottom-line, make yourself more accessible to your people. Hiding behind a wall will not enhance productivity.

Also published with News Talk Florida.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  FATHERS EAT HEELS – and perform all the thankless jobs around the house.

LAST TIME:  BECOMING A “SENIOR”  – Quite often, we do not see it coming.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific); and WWBA-AM (News Talk Florida 820). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Business, Management | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

BECOMING A “SENIOR”

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 1, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Quite often, we do not see it coming.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

A rite of passage we must all experience is becoming a “senior.” It can be used to denote the final year of high school or college, or graduation from some other institution, such as a tour of duty in the military. It denotes we are growing older which we commonly overlook.

When I was a senior in high school, age 18, I was in the downtown area of my hometown of Wyoming, Ohio wearing my WHS school letter jacket. I was waiting for a ride and just minding my own business. Nearby were two kids, about age 10, who were talking. I overheard one of them say, “Let’s ask that man over there what time it is. Hey Mister…” I was surprised by the comment, and at first didn’t realize they were talking to me. To be recognized as an adult for the first time was an epiphany for me, something I was unprepared for. Only then did it occur to me I was growing up.

More recently, I was recognized as the 2015-16 Outstanding School Volunteer for Palm Harbor University High School (PHUHS) for my work with CABAM (Center of Academics for Business Administration and Management), a special program within the school designed to provide for the education of business related skills. Personally, I believe it to be an important program and something I wish I had when I was in high school. I appreciated the honor, but noticed I was selected for the “Senior” category. Just as when I was 18, I was surprised by the designation as I still consider myself a regular adult who continues to work. While others my age are scrambling to retire, I cannot see myself doing so. There is too much to do yet, and I do not play golf or shuffle board.

To me, becoming a senior means you possess certain experiences and people rely on your expertise to advise them on various matters, such as in business, education, a particular craft or skill, politics, and life in general. To do so, you must be willing to give back to your community or industry and offer wise counsel.

Not everyone feels this way though. I have met too many people check out when they retire, becoming apathetic, and dropping out of sight.

What I find interesting about the “senior” designation, it is something we all yearn for as we grow up; to be recognized as some sort of experienced expert. I was disappointed when I became a senior both in high school and college. After all of the expectations, I found it wasn’t a big deal. “Is this all there is?” I would lament. I believe we are in too much of a hurry to grow up and do not spend enough time enjoying the moment. However, there are instances where we do not see it coming, such as when I was 18.

Yes, I was surprised by the “Senior” classification on my volunteer award. I certainly do not feel like one.

And stop asking me when I’m going to retire. I still have plenty of dances left on my card.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  FINDING THE TIME AS MANAGER – Embrace your workers, do not avoid them.

LAST TIME:  THE NEED FOR CONCEALED WEAPONS CLASSES  – Why it should be considered mandatory to attend such classes.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific); and WWBA-AM (News Talk Florida 820). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

 
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