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Archive for December, 2016

2016 YEAR-END WRAP-UP

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 23, 2016

BRYCE ON JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING

– My most popular columns this year.

This is my last column for the year as I prepare to enjoy the holidays and rest up for 2017. As has become customary, I’m going to use this opportunity to review my top essays from the past year.

It was a busy year in 2016. In addition to my blog, I have been writing for News Talk Florida and the Huffington Post which is rather amazing when you consider the liberal slant of the Post.

As you know, I write on a variety of subjects, such as management, systems, technology, social issues, politics, and observations of our changing world. Sometimes my work is instructional and informative, other times it is controversial or humorous. I certainly hope it isn’t boring. By the number of subscribers I have, their comments, and the hits I have on my web site, I do not believe this is the case.

For my year-end column, I researched my statistics to see which were my most popular. As 2016 was a major election year, I have considerable political columns which did well, as you will see. Therefore, here are my “greatest hits” for 2016.

NOTE: You can find the audio versions for many of these columns on My Web Page.

GENERAL POLITICAL

“Florida Vote-by-Mail Request & Early Voting Statistics “ – this was my #1 column of the year as I updated it on a daily basis for two weeks. Those concerned about the election outcome in Florida paid particular attention to this piece.

“Why The Electoral College Matters” – following the election, Democrats had a problem understanding the difference between the popular vote and the electoral college, hence I wrote this column which enjoyed wide circulation.

“So you’re thinking of voting independent are you?”

“Shocking the Press” (aka, “The Media Is Reeling From This Election Result”)

“Election Post Mortem” – a good review following the election.

“The Attack of the Wusses” – another follow-up piece after the election.

“The Problems with Political Polling” – explaining the flaws in polling.

“Au Revoir Democratic Party” – written after Nancy Pelosi won again the House Minority leader.

HILLARY CLINTON

“A Look Back at Hillary Clinton’s Record” – this column was heavily referenced prior to election day.

“Book Review: Crisis of Character” – also frequently referenced.

“Clinton still favored by Vegas and British bookmakers” (aka, “Odds Are Donald Trump Remains A Good Bet For President”) – a fun piece on gambling and the election.

“What it means to vote for Hillary Clinton” (aka, “Hillary Clinton: Why You Shouldn’t Vote For Her”)

DONALD TRUMP

“Why I’m Voting for Donald Trump” – my most frequently read article from my Trump series.

“What I learned attending a Trump Rally” – the lessons regarding the press was interesting.

“Understanding the Trump Personality” (aka, “Understanding the Type A Personality”) – this is still a worthwhile read for anyone who wants to understand our President-Elect.

“Candidate Trump Visits Tampa Bay One Last Time” – over 20,000 people were there.

“What Do We Know about Mr. Trump?” – this column too was frequently referenced.

“The Democrats are Scared” – and they had good reason to be.

“Donald Trump’s Plan: Jump Start The Economy” – at the start of his Victory Tour.

LIFE

“Leave it to the Cops” – very popular piece on the responsibilities of law enforcement personnel.

“It’s Wednesday and I’m already sick of the Olympics”

BUSINESS

“How Can Allegiant Airlines Survive?” – based on personal experience.

“What Ever Happened to UNIVAC?” – a bit of history regarding the first commercial computer.

“Microsoft Dusts Off Speech Recognition” – I was surprised by the popularity of this piece.

“Proof of Technology Addiction” – includes an important message on the use of technology.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year everyone!

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

LAST TIME:  ENJOY EVERY MOMENT  – And take nothing for granted.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Business, Life, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

ENJOY EVERY MOMENT

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 21, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– And take nothing for granted.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Christmas is rapidly approaching and if 2016 taught me anything, it is to enjoy every moment.

I had a doctor friend pass away a couple of months ago. At 65 years old, he appeared to be in the pink of health, but was suddenly struck down by Leukemia and a stroke. Despite all of the attempts to save him, which were considerable, he lasted 103 short days before passing away. At the end, his body was emaciated, so much so, his coffin was closed for his funeral.

He was a good man, good father, trusted and dependable doctor, and was dedicated to his church. We would often see him at lunch at a nearby restaurant where we would discuss at length the world’s current events and share a few laughs. His wife is a peach with a great sense of humor. They were blessed to have raised a fine son and daughter, and were now beginning to enjoy their grandchildren.

His medical practice was successful which afforded him an opulent house on the Gulf of Mexico, sports cars, and season tickets to the Tampa Bay Rays. His passion for baseball included coaching his son and friends in Little League. He also possessed a civic duty and readily volunteered his time and donated money to several charities and his church.

Hundreds of people attended his funeral and during the ceremony several people stood up to say a few words in remembrance of him. His son struggled with the eulogy, but somehow got through it. Several tears were shed; it was quite touching.

Despite all of his success and generosity, watching him struck down so suddenly caused several of us to consider how precious life is and why we shouldn’t take it for granted. When you are young, there is a tendency to feel invincible, causing you to overlook life’s little intimacies which we should relish, but commonly overlook.

This was reinforced over the Thanksgiving holidays when we had a member of the family suffer through respiratory failure, but fortunately is now on the mend. It was scary for all of us. I had another friend whose mother tripped and fell just before Thanksgiving, thereby causing her to break her hip requiring surgery to replace it. Another friend had a foot operation, and several others experienced severe colds.

I mention this because we normally host a party at noon on Thanksgiving with friends and neighbors. We call it the “half time” party as it allows people to escape the kitchen for awhile and share a glass of cheer. Unfortunately, due to all of the medical problems, we couldn’t hold this little get-together this year, and we all missed the camaraderie.

From all of this, I’ve learned to appreciate every moment; to sit and talk, to laugh, to listen, to help and support, to take pride in our work and pastimes, to become a benefit as opposed to a burden on others, to be grateful for our health and the simple joys of life, to take nothing for granted, and to simply enjoy every moment.

Merry Christmas!

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  2016 YEAR-END WRAP-UP – My most popular columns this year.

LAST TIME:  WHERE HAVE ALL THE WRISTWATCHES GONE?  – They are slowly disappearing.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

GETTING BURNED

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 19, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Some people have to learn the hard way.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I had a situation where I was working with a young Systems Analyst who was ambitious but a bit naive as to the field of information systems. Nonetheless he wanted to boldly tackle a major systems project for his company and asked me for advice. I encouraged him to first study the parts of the business the system would serve, specify the end-user information requirements, and produce an overall system blueprint. “No, no, no, I’ve already got it worked out in my head,” he told me and started programming. Although he was very proficient in how to write program code, his software didn’t adequately serve the needs of his users and his project failed miserably.

Regardless of how you try to coach someone, I find it disheartening that a lot of people have to burn their fingers before they learn something. Maybe this has something to do with the cockiness of youth whereby there is a great temptation to leap before you look. It seems impetuousness has a lot to do with this, particularly for those who yearn to make a name for themselves. It’s one thing to have an academic knowledge of a subject, quite another to have practical experience.

When you try to use logic to persuade people, they want to argue with you. 2 + 2 is no longer 4, but 5 instead, or it’s no longer black and white but some shade of gray. When you use examples and case histories to illustrate your point, they believe it is an obsolete analogy to the subject at hand. Frankly, the people who tend to get burned are those who know just enough about a subject to be dangerous, and they will argue you to the ground simply because they are combative and want to wear you out. This leads me to believe there is a fine line between intelligence and stupidity.

I guess what I finally learned is there are certain people who need to get burned and learn the hard way. Consequently, I find I no longer argue as vehemently as before and let people make their own mistakes as long as it doesn’t affect me personally. I’ll still be willing to offer my advice, but I’m just not going to try to shove it down anyone’s throat.

In closing, I am reminded of the old story of two bulls, one old and one young, who were standing on a hill overlooking a herd of cattle. Being a bit impetuous, the young bull said to his elder, “How about we charge down the hill, snort loudly, and make love to a couple of cows?” The old bull replied, “I have a better idea; let’s quietly sneak down the back of this hill, slip around from behind, and get the whole herd.”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  ENJOY EVERY MOMENT – And take nothing for granted.

LAST TIME:  WHERE HAVE ALL THE WRISTWATCHES GONE?  – They are slowly disappearing.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

WHERE HAVE ALL THE WRISTWATCHES GONE?

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 16, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– They are slowly disappearing.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

My wristwatch recently broke and I had it taken in for repair. At first I kind of felt like a dog who had lost his collar, like an important part of me was missing. After awhile though, I got used to it and felt somewhat unshackled. I think the last time I was without a watch was back when I was in high school. Surprisingly, I discovered I didn’t miss the watch that much and may go on without wearing one. I have no problem knowing the time as I can find it just about everywhere, including my PC, in my automobiles, on television and radio, and general wall clocks. Cell phones and other personal electronic devices also maintain the time. So much so that young people imbued with the new technologies are less likely to wear a watch than their elders.

One of the reasons we wear wristwatches is as a status symbol, a sort of “coming of age” thing and is an expression of our personality. Gaudy and gold watches are worn by wannabe power brokers. Sleek watches are worn by people who want to appear hip and contemporary. The super-gadget watches are worn by the techno-geeks, and the basic sports watches are worn by the jocks and naturalists.

As watch wearing declines, watch makers are scrambling to make new models that will appeal to the younger generation and include such things as temperature readings, GPS, Internet access, multimedia or whatever. In a way, it will be reminiscent of Dick Tracy’s 2-Way Wrist Radio/TV.

However, I think the days of wristwatches as a status symbol are winding down. Young people do not seem to look upon the prestige of watches like my generation did or my predecessors. Basically, the watch has been replaced by the smart phone with its many different features, everything from simple phones to sophisticated devices that can be used for just about anything, e.g., camera, recording device, radio/television, dictation machine, etc. As for me, I’m waiting for a model that comes with either an electric razor or a phaser.

I see many friends and business contacts constantly trying to do one-upmanship over their smart phones. This doesn’t impress me, but then again neither did an expensive watch. Nonetheless, the transfer of status from watches to cell phones is a phenomenon that should not go unnoticed, as it is marking the end of an era, the start of another, and a change in our culture.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  GETTING BURNED – Some people have to learn the hard way.

LAST TIME:  POLITICS AT THE DINNER TABLE  – Do we use this as an opportunity to reason and discuss?

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Life, Society | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

THE WAR AGAINST TRUMP

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 15, 2016

 

It may not be fought with guns and tanks, but it is a war nevertheless.

Click for AUDIO version.

 

The Democrats and main street media did not like losing the general election. They are still at a loss as to how Donald Trump won and, as such, cannot accept the election results. So much so, they believe there must be some foul-play afoot on the GOP side. Because of this, they are putting President-Elect Trump under a microscope and will contest everything he does from now on. To illustrate:

* During his transition planning period, they criticize every appointment Mr. Trump makes and casts suspicion regarding each candidate’s character and intentions. With rare exception, it appears Mr. Trump is selecting people with real-world experience, be it in business or the military, as opposed to people from academia. The Democrats and media simply do not accept this.

* Every one of Mr. Trump’s publicly made decisions has been ridiculed, be it the Carrier deal, the costs for Air Force One, or his feelings on intel briefings. This leads me to believe he will be less likely to tell the press much of anything during his administration.

* The Democrats recalled votes in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, a costly endeavor which bore no fruit and actually garnered more votes for Mr. Trump.

* There is a desperate movement to change electoral votes. One electoral voter in Lake Wales, Florida, Kathryn “Kat” Gates-Skipper, a Republican, claims she is being inundated with mail, e-mails, phone messages, even Christmas cards, not to cast her vote for Mr. Trump. It is obvious to her that her background was well researched as most of the correspondence she receives mentions her prior service in the U.S. Marines and veteran affairs. Interestingly, she claims most of the notes are coming from California and were openly from various Democratic organizations. Even the Associated Press reached out to her to ask about her vote. Kat is not alone in this full court press as she claims the two other electoral voters in Polk County are also being swamped with solicitations to change their votes and probably all of the other Florida electorates as well.

* They are trying to make an argument that Trump is a puppet of Russia. However, this is based on flimsy evidence regarding the Democrat’s and Republican’s e-mail servers, making one wonder if it was an internal leak as opposed to an external hack. In all likelihood, this will result in another expensive Congressional investigation with nothing to show for it.

* And there is still a movement underfoot to protest and stop the inauguration.

These maneuvers to delegitimize Mr. Trump’s victory are insidious and smacks of sore-losers. During his term of office, it is unlikely there will be anything done by the President-Elect that will be trumpeted as a success, be it a better health plan, developing a more robust GDP, better trade deals, tightening of our immigration laws, defeat of ISIS, Supreme Court nominees, or whatever. Even if Mr. Trump were to miraculously create world peace, the Democrats and media would still want him hung on a cross as he represents an outsider challenging the Washington establishment.

Even though Mr. Trump hasn’t been sworn in yet, the press is already considering who will be the Democratic nominee for 2020, with Joe Biden currently leading the pack (click HERE). Just as they underestimated Mr. Trump from the beginning, it is beyond their comprehension he will be successful as president and run for a second term.

All of this means Mr. Trump’s term of office will likely be the most tumultuous in recent memory. It will make Richard Nixon’s relationship with the Democrats and press seem like a cozy arrangement.

To his credit though, Mr. Trump ignores the criticism and carries on, giving the impression he is on a mission. All of this, much to the chagrin of his detractors. The President-elect’s only ace in the hole is that the GOP controls both chambers of Congress.

In reality, what we are witnessing is a change in our culture, not so much in terms of race or sex, but in the sense of our moral values, as to what is right and wrong. For example, the movement towards Mr. Trump means people want a less intrusive government with more freedom and personal initiative. This culture war is at the heart of the liberal agenda who seeks to change the very character of America. Cultural changes are naturally volatile as it represents a departure from the status quo. This is true in corporate culture, as well as in any change of government. People will either embrace the change or resist it. This explains why the Democrats and media are desperately trying to thwart Mr. Trump as his interests appears to be the antithesis of theirs, particularly Mr. Obama’s. In reality, Mr. Trump is a complex individual with considerable experience in world business, and claims to love this country. As such, he considers both sides of an issue before making a decision, something we should do more of.

Even though the Democrats and main street media are pledged to fight Mr. Trump to the bitter end, the one undeniable fact driving them absolutely bananas, is that Donald Trump will be inaugurated the 45th President of the United States on January 20th, 2017.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , | 3 Comments »

POLITICS AT THE DINNER TABLE

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 14, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Do we use this as an opportunity to reason and discuss?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

During this past Thanksgiving holiday, we were admonished by several talking heads on television not to discuss politics at the dinner table in order to maintain peace and harmony. I vehemently disagree as I see this as more political correctness running amok.

As we all know, our young people are no longer learning the important lessons of civics and history at the high school level, and college professors are twisting American history in order to make us feel guilty about our past. Concepts such as “American exceptionalism” and “Manifest Destiny” are very much frowned upon by liberal professors who are busily rewriting history and reshaping the perspective of our past.

So, if youth is truly not learning the lessons of government, what better place to do so than at the dinner table? For starters we should use this opportunity to determine what our youth are learning in school, how it affects their perception of our country, and clear up any misconceptions. For example, ask about their patriotism. Do they stand for the flag and recite the pledge of allegiance? Do they regularly vote? Do they understand their responsibilities for serving on a jury? What is their understanding of current events?

Discussion should allow for the open exchange of ideas, not unilateral. I don’t mind an opposing view, but I want to know why they have it, and certainly do not want to ostracize the person. In my day, everything was on the table for review, including drugs, religion, politics, war, law and order, sex, etc. The discussion should be more in the form of a debate as opposed to hotheaded slander or sarcasm. Interestingly, I find this is more easily done with conservatives as opposed to liberals who are trained to passionately attack rather than reason.

As to history, discuss the necessity of the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. What were the events leading up to the Civil War, World Wars I & II, as well as Korea and Viet Nam? Do they understand the “Domino Theory” of communism? What are the differences between capitalism and socialism, or Democrats vs. Republicans, liberals vs. conservatives? What is gerrymandering and the electoral college?

There is a lot to discuss at the dinner table. Failing to discuss such subjects does nothing but promote ignorance and encourages misunderstandings that may lead to emotional meltdowns as we saw recently following the 2016 elections, but even worse, withdrawals from our obligations as citizens.

Christmas is rapidly approaching, and we’ll once again gather around the dinner table. If you want to stick your head in the sand as the pundits suggest, be my guest. As for me, I’ll have an extra helping of discussion with that turkey and dressing.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  WHERE HAVE ALL THE WRISTWATCHES GONE? – They are slowly disappearing.

LAST TIME:  OUR FIXATION WITH NAME SUFFIXES  – Do we make too much out of them?

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Life, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

OUR FIXATION WITH NAME SUFFIXES

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 12, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Do we make too much out of them?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I have always been fascinated with our use of suffixes in names, such as “Senior” or “Junior.” I look upon the use of such monikers as a desperate cry for attention. Years ago I had a friend who put “Senior” after his name on business cards. Knowing he had no offspring yet, I asked why he did this. He explained it was wishful thinking on his part to someday have a son to carry on the family name. Of course, he was blessed with a trio of girls and eventually dropped the suffix.

Then there are the people who add Roman Numerals after their name to indicate they are the second, third, fourth, or whatever to bear the same name. I guess they see this as a way to add class and dignity to the family name. I think the highest was a “V” representing five people with the same boring name. I am tempted to add the Roman Numerals “MLXVII” to the end of my name, thereby confusing people or allowing them to believe there has been 1,067 generations of Tim Bryce. That should scare them.

In academia, Doctors use Ph.D. which actually means Doctor of Philosophy, or to be more literal, it is Latin for Philosophiae Doctor. The idea that a doctor is a philosopher in the strictest sense, isn’t very comforting if you are in the hospital where I would rather be treated by an MD (Medical Doctor, or Doctor of Medicine). In business there are the MBAs representing a Master’s degree in Business Administration. Interestingly, you do not see too many people denoting their Bachelor’s degree. I can only assume they are ashamed of the title as compared to the Ph.D. or MBA. As for me, I’m proud to say I hold a BSC degree, representing a Bachelor of Science degree in Communications. I worked hard for this and am proud of the designation, but I do not print it on my business cards.

Depending on the line of work we select, there are often many certifications we can claim. The entertainment industry is full of them, most notably the American Cinema Editors (ACE). In my field, the computer industry, there have been numerous certifications. For example, I was among the first group to hold the Certified Systems Professional (CSP) title which, unfortunately died after the country stopped building information systems and focused on software instead. A Certified Data Processor (CDP) was also a coveted title requiring several weeks of study and testing. This too faded from view and was replaced by something called the Certified Computing Professional (CCP). It kind of sounds like the old Soviet Union doesn’t it?

The industry certification programs were replaced by those sponsored by specific vendors, such as Microsoft, Adobe, Apple, and many others. In Microsoft’s case, there are at least six certification programs that I am aware of, including:

Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA)
Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA)
Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE)
Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer (MCSD)
Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT)
Microsoft Certified Educator (MCE)

I would like to meet the guy who refers to himself as “John Doe, MTA, MCSA, MCSE, MCSD, MCT, MCE.” I do not believe there is a business card big enough to hold all this. Frankly, I believe this does more to advertise Microsoft products, than reveals any substantial skill.

Nonprofit organizations make extensive use of titles, particularly the Freemasons, the ancient fraternal organization well known for wearing aprons, sashes and other regalia. They also make extensive use of titles, such as Past Master (PM), Past District Deputy Grand Master (PDDGM), Past District Instructor (PDI), Past Grand Master (PGM), not to mention their prefixes of Worshipful, Right Worshipful, or Most Worshipful. I suspect this was all created to establish some sort of prestige competition. To me, too much emphasis is paced on these suffixes and not enough on the simple word of “Brother.”

A few years ago, I tried an experiment whereby I signed my name as “Tim Bryce, LSMFT” which, of course, are the initials for “Lucky Strike Means Fine Tobacco,” an advertising scheme used for many years. I believe it is still printed on each pack of Luck Strike cigarettes. Nonetheless, very few people picked up on the ruse and were impressed by my title. Not many people asked me what it meant as they didn’t want to appear clueless. However, when someone asked me about it, I would explain what it meant and they would laugh, but then started to think about the point I was trying to make.

In the movie, “The Flim Flam Man,” George C. Scott plays the role of a southern swindler with the name, Mordecai Jones, MBSCSDD, which stood for “Master of Back Stabbing, Cork-Screwing and Dirty Dealing.”

I tend to believe we rely too heavily on these name suffixes. They’re pompous, arrogant and often result in negative political side effects. I’m of the age where I am no longer easily impressed. I have met way too many people with titles who are book smart but cannot produce a work product on time or within budget. I have also done my fair share of travel throughout the corporate world and have seen everything from the boardroom to the trenches. I certainly do not need another title. However, there are people who have led a sheltered existence and want to have their egos stroked with some form of recognition. These are the people who desperately seek such suffixes.

Keep the Faith!

– Tim Bryce, EIEIO

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  POLITICS AT THE DINNER TABLE – Do we use this as an opportunity to reason and discuss?

LAST TIME:  ADMITTING A MISTAKE  – “The longer you delay admitting a mistake, the more expensive it will be to correct.” – Bryce’s Law

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

ADMITTING A MISTAKE

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 9, 2016

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

– “The longer you delay admitting a mistake, the more expensive it will be to correct.” – Bryce’s Law

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Nobody likes to admit making a mistake. We tend to believe it makes us look bad in the eyes of our coworkers, friends and particularly the boss. It’s a real test of our integrity. Some people like to cover-up mistakes so they go undetected or, even worse, let someone else take the blame for them. I find mistakes tend to fester and grow if left unchecked, thereby causing bigger headaches and costing a lot more money if we don’t catch them in time.

Every once in awhile you have to look your boss straight in the eye and say, “I screwed up.” It’s kind of like having a priest listen to your confession. Although the boss may be disappointed, he will be appreciative of the fact you came clean with him early on and brought the problem to his attention where it can be caught and corrected with minimal damage.

In this day and age of micromanagement you don’t see too many people willing to admit a mistake. They take on an assignment, get in over their head, and fail to yell for help in time. This does a disservice to the assignment, the people depending on you, and yourself. In business, it is not uncommon to see people rising above their level of competency (aka, “The Peter Principle”). In other words, they have been placed in a position where they are incapable of performing their job effectively. Keeping them in this position is a disservice to the company as well as to the person. Frankly, I think we have too many people in over their heads who refuse to ask for help, which I consider a pretty scary operating scenario.

We have all made mistakes we wish we could take back and correct, some small, others real beauts, but there is nobody out there without a blemish on their record, which is why we are all willing to forgive, provided the person comes clean with it early on.

There’s an old axiom in business that says, “If you make 51% of your decisions correctly, you will be a success.” I’m not suggesting we don’t strive for perfection, but we should all realize it is an impossibility. After all, the last guy who was perfect, they hung on a cross.

Also published with News Talk Florida.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  OUR FIXATION WITH NAME SUFFIXES – Do we make too much out of them?

LAST TIME:  75TH ANNIVERSARY OF PEARL HARBOR  – Remembering “a day of infamy.”

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Management | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

75TH ANNIVERSARY OF PEARL HARBOR

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 7, 2016

BRYCE ON HISTORY

– Remembering “a day of infamy.”

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Today, we observe the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day, a day we set aside in America to commemorate “a date which will live in infamy,” December 7th, 1941, when the Imperial military forces of Japan bombed military targets in Hawaii or, as many called it, a “sneak attack.” Today, in the 21st century where 9-11 is fresh in our memories, the Pearl Harbor attack is quickly fading into obscurity as the “greatest generation” fades away with it. I’m afraid 9-11 is superseding December 7th, just as the Pearl Harbor attack superseded “Remember the Maine” in 1898. All were unfortunate disasters, and I don’t want to say one is better than another, but it would be unfortunate if we forgot the important lessons they taught us, particularly December 7th.

Pearl Harbor is a story of courage, survival, and a spirit of “don’t give up the ship.” On that day in 1941 approximately 2,500 people were killed and another 1,200 wounded. Four major battleships were sunk in the harbor (though two were subsequently raised), numerous planes were destroyed, and America’s Pacific fleet was set into disarray. To this day, 75 years later, oil still leaks from the USS Arizona which sits in its watery crave in the harbor.

The bombing shocked and angered the nation. Had it not been a surprise attack, it may not have aroused the emotions of Americans, but such is hindsight.

The real lesson learned from Pearl Harbor was how unprepared we were and how we could have prevented it. To illustrate, prior to the Pearl Harbor disaster, the Army sent General Billy Mitchell to study Pacific defenses. Mitchell’s notoriety stemmed from his advocacy of air power. During World War I he commanded all of the American air combat units in France. He was a visionary who understood the potential of the airplane and pushed hard to promote air power which, as he discovered, was difficult to do during peacetime. His arguments extolling the virtues of air power fell on deaf ears and earned him the scorn of his superiors, who sent him to the Pacific (and get him out of their hair).

During his tour of the Pacific, Mitchell visited Japan and witnessed firsthand how the Japanese were embracing air power and realized America was far behind their counterparts. Following his tour of the Pacific he produced an extensive 323 page report on his assessment of American defenses in the Pacific. Here are excerpts from it:

“One hears it often said that Japanese cannot fly. Nothing is more fallacious than this. They can fly, are going to fly, and may end up by developing the greatest air power in the world… It takes no longer to teach Japanese than it does Anglo-Saxons.”

“Japan knows full well that the United States will probably enter the next war with the methods and weapons of the former war… Japan also knows full well that the defense of the Hawaiian group is based on the island of Oahu and not on the defense of the whole group.”

(After describing in detail the tactics and timing of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor) “I have gone into attack by an enemy in some detail to show how easily it can be done by a determined and resourceful enemy… Actually nothing can stop it except air power…”

“(Japan) knows that war is coming some day with the United States, and it will be a contest for her very existence. The United States must not render herself completely defenseless by on the one hand thinking that a war with Japan is an impossibility, and on the other by sticking to methods and means of making war as obsolete as the bow and arrow.”(1)

Interestingly, this report was produced in 1924, seventeen years before the Pearl Harbor bombings. Mitchell was not only prophetic, he was correct. Regardless of how accurate Mitchell’s report was, he was criticized and ignored by the Army, and the report was quickly dismissed. One year later, Mitchell would be court-martialed and suspended for remarks he made accusing the Army and Navy of military incompetence.

Regardless of the military’s feeling about him, Mitchell had delivered a fair warning and provided a blueprint of weaknesses in Pacific defenses which, had they been corrected, would have changed the course of history.

Pearl Harbor Day to me is a strong reminder of how Americans tend to be reactionaries as opposed to planners. I find it incredibly strange and dangerous that we prefer to pay attention to a dog only after it has bitten us, as opposed to heeding its bark. Our history is checkered with many examples of reactionary behavior, all coming at an incredible expense to American lives.

TODAY

Today, we commemorate the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor. Regretably, the number of survivors grow fewer with the passing of each year. A parade is planned with actor Gary Sinise as the Grand Marshall. You can watch it by clicking HERE. For information of Pearl Harbor historical sites, click HERE. To learn about internment at the USS Arizona, click HERE.

Keep the Faith!

EPILOGUE: In 1942, after Pearl Harbor proved Mitchell correct, FDR restored his service record and elevated him to the rank of major general. Regrettably, he had passed away six years earlier never knowing how prophetic he had been.

1 – “The Billy Mitchell Story” by Burke Davis

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  ADMITTING A MISTAKE – “The longer you delay admitting a mistake, the more expensive it will be to correct.” – Bryce’s Law

LAST TIME:  THE ATTACK OF THE WUSSES  – Considerations of the anti-Trump pushback.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in History | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

THE ATTACK OF THE WUSSES

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 5, 2016

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– Considerations of the anti-Trump push back.

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Since the general election I have been preoccupied with other priorities. However, I have kept an eye on the news regarding the push back to Mr. Trump’s victory. Yes, I have seen the demonstrations and anarchist riots, the Grubhub boss who threatened to fire employees supporting Trump, people physically attacking Trump supporters, the Seattle councilwomen calling for a blockage of the presidential inauguration, the parodies of Trump on television, the “Hamilton” reprimand of Mr. Pence, the flag burnings, the invention of “Post-election anxiety” whereby service dogs and grieving counselors are provided for students, and that Mr. Obama may not go quietly into the night as other presidents have done before him.

One comment that particularly caught my attention was from a parent who lamented, “What am I going to say to my children; how will I explain this to them?” Perhaps the best way is to learn from Republicans who had to do likewise in 2008 when Mr. Obama was elected president, by explaining this is how our electoral process works. Democrats may be surprised to learn when our current president was elected, many Republicans believed the country had made a big mistake, and many still believe so to this day.

Republicans were aghast to watch Mr. Obama follow a socialist agenda. The Affordable Care Act (aka, Obamacare) was drafted and implemented without consulting GOP congressmen or senators; their input was simply not wanted. This established a confrontational relationship with Congress and gridlock ensued that haunted us throughout his term of office, leading him to write executive order after executive order as an end run around Congress. His policies led to more than doubling the national debt, a regressive Gross Domestic Product, the rule of law was threatened, violence and joblessness plagues our inner cities, an out-of-control immigration situation, and a diminished leadership role in the world community. From a Republican’s point of view, Mr. Obama was an epic failure, even worse than Jimmy Carter. Consider this, if he had done so well, Hillary Clinton would have easily ascended to the presidency on his coattails. Instead, the American people said “enough is enough,” and elected Mr. Trump instead in a landslide electoral victory of 290-232. Mr. Trump’s victory represents a rebuff of Mr. Obama’s policies and programs. Whereas Jimmy Carter begat Ronald Reagan, Barack Obama did likewise for Donald Trump. Despite all of this, Republicans still recognized Mr. Obama as the legitimate President of the United States, like it or not. Liberal Democrats simply do not comprehend any of this.

Democrats feel it is their duty to demonize Trump supporters as racist and sexist bigots. It is now an inherent part of their vernacular. In contrast, an argument could be made to call the anti-Trump people politically and historically ignorant as they have no comprehension of how the electoral process works. Once again, we heard from the left regarding the evils of the American electoral college, that the popular vote should suffice. If they had studied history, they would realize the electoral college is a stroke of genius by our forefathers who sought parity between the metropolitan and rural areas of the country. It was devised by men such as James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Jefferson, who had an in-depth understanding of government based on their studies of ancient Greece, Rome, and Europe. Our young people have simply no comprehension of any of this, which is what happens when you no longer teach civics or history anymore. Interestingly, despite the voiced displeasure of our young people, ages 18-29, only 19% voted in the election. They either do not know how to cast ballots to voice their desires or have simply abdicated the American electoral process.

Honestly, what are the young people crying about? Because their candidate lost? It is certainly not the end of the world, or our country. Maybe it is because we have conditioned youth to believe everyone wins in sports and academics, that there are no losers. No, I have no sympathies for any of this. I’m sorry, the home team doesn’t always win. Ask the Cleveland Indians. Get over it.

Fanning the flames of discontent is the news media who is still reeling from being proven so wrong about the election, they were embarrassed and humiliated. To compensate, they are now doggedly psychoanalyzing and criticizing every decision and appointment Mr. Trump makes. The degree of hounding will undoubtedly go way beyond that of Richard Nixon. However, as a businessman, look for Mr. Trump to redefine the rules of the game for the press in his White House.

Following Mrs. Clinton’s defeat, the Democratic party has gone into a tail spin. They desperately need to clean house under new leadership. This also happened after Ronald Reagan soundly defeated Jimmy Carter in 1980. The DNC had to do some introspective soul-searching under the assistance of Lee Iacocca.

In the senate, Harry Reid is finally being put out to pasture. Before leaving though, he called Mr. Trump, “a sexual predator who lost the popular vote and fueled his campaign with bigotry and hate.” If the country is going to heal, such rhetoric has to be removed. Hopefully, his replacement as Senate Minority Leader, Chuck Schumer, will be more effective, particularly in lieu of the fact he and Mr. Trump have a long relationship in New York.

In the House, Nancy Pelosi was challenged for minority leader by Tim Ryan of Ohio who is more interested in reestablishing relations with the working class as opposed to the liberal agenda. He’s right. During the presidential campaign, I met many Trump Democrats who lamented their party had deserted them. If the Democrats do not heed the warnings of people such as Congressman Ryan, they are doomed to lose more power in the next electoral cycle.

What we are witnessing is a widening of the cultural divide in this country. Whereas one side respects the rule of law and order, the other does not. Our moral values are becoming increasingly incompatible; and our interpretation of reality is blurred. It is no wonder, there are those who perceive the Republican agenda as evil, and the Democratic agenda as reckless and non-pragmatic.

As to the Liberal Democrats concerned with what to say to their children, try telling the truth. I do not recall any backlash in 2008 by the Republicans. We may not have liked Mr. Obama, but he was the one who was elected president, not John McCain.

Also published with The Huffington Post.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  75TH ANNIVERSARY OF PEARL HARBOR – Remembering “a day of infamy.”

LAST TIME:  BEING SICK  – What happens when the crud hits you?

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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