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Archive for October, 2017

THE FOUR STEPS FOR AMERICAN SUBVERSION

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 13, 2017

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– A warning from a former KGB agent.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

The premise behind Hitchcock’s 1935 movie classic, “The 39 Steps,” was not about a staircase, but rather a series of clandestine tasks to ultimately overthrow the government. It was an intriguing movie but as it turns out, it actually takes considerably fewer steps to subvert a government, four to be exact, at least according to Yuri Bezmenov, a former KGB agent. Throughout the 1960’s, Bezmenov served the KGB primarily in India where he spread Soviet propaganda and disinformation to the Western world. He eventually defected to the West in 1970 and settled in Canada where he lectured and wrote about the KGB’s techniques for subverting the West.

In 1985 he was featured in a television interview which is still available on YouTube. During the interview, Bezmenov explains the KGB’s activities are less about espionage in the classic James Bond sense (only 15%), and more concerned with “Ideological Subversion” (85%) which is used to secretly undermine the American government through psychological warfare. Key to this program is to change the perception of reality using subliminal brainwashing techniques over an extended period of time. As I’ve written in the past, people act on their perceptions of reality, regardless if it is correct or fallacious. They are not so much concerned with facts as they are in perspectives and self interests. By controlling the perceptions of people, they become more prone to make erroneous conclusions thereby simplifying the manipulation of the masses. The objective of the KGB program, therefore, is to program people into dismissing true facts as fallacious even in spite of the obvious.

As Bezmenov explains in the interview, there are four steps to transform the thinking and behavior of the population:

1. Demoralization – this is a process which can take about 15-30 years to perform (a generation). During this stage, the moral fibre and integrity of the country is put into question, thereby creating doubt in the minds of the people. To do so, manipulation of the media and academia is required to influence young people. As the younger generation embraces new values, such as Marxism and Leninism, the older generation slowly loses control simply through attrition. Again, true facts no longer matter during this stage, but rather creating perceptions are of paramount importance.

2. Destabilization – the purpose of this step is to change the status quo, particularly the country’s economy, foreign relations, and defense systems. The intent is to create a massive government permeating society and becoming intrusive in the lives of its citizens. This can take from two to five years to perform, again with the active support of academia pushing youth in this direction. Here, entitlements and benefits are promised to the populace to encourage their support. Basically, they are bribing the people to accept their programs.

Bezmenov claims after this stage is completed, the naive college professors are no longer needed and since they will undoubtedly protest government policies when they discover the truth, they will be disposed of quickly. He cites examples of this occurring in Nicaragua, Grenada, Afghanistan, and Bangladesh.

3. Crisis – this is a major step lasting up to six weeks and involves a revolutionary change of power. This is where a cataclysmic event upsets and divides the country thereby creating panic among the citizens. Recent examples include the 2011 upheavals in the Middle East, most notably Egypt and Libya. To Americans, symptoms would include circumventing the Constitution and altering the checks and balances of government, and possibly martial law.

4. Normalization – the final stage is where the populace finally acquiesces and begins to assimilate communism. This can take up to two decades to complete.

Bezmenov claimed the first step, Demoralization, was completed well before his 1985 interview. In fact, the Russians were surprised how easily it had been performed. One clear indicator of the moral decay of the country is the decline of organized religion which, historically, has been a beacon for morality, but now it is in retreat. He also thought step two was nearing completion in 1985 but I believe he underestimated the rise and popularity of Ronald Reagan as president, which led to the end of the Cold War with the Soviet Union in 1991, and the shift to the War on Terror following 9/11. Nonetheless, many would argue America is now realizing Bezmenov’s scenario in 2012, particularly as the November elections loom ahead. This means the third step is in the offing which has a lot of people frightened for America’s future.

Yuri Bezmenov died in 1993 never realizing his prophecy, and hopefully it will never come to fruition, that we will remain a free and democratic Republic bound to the U.S. Constitution. However, as Bezmenov reminds us, communism requires simple patience and perseverance to alter the perceptions of the people. The only way to thwart it is to practice due diligence and not let it go unchallenged.

“America is like a healthy body and its resistance is threefold: its patriotism, its morality, and its spiritual life.
If we can undermine these three areas, America will collapse from within.”

– Joseph Stalin

“The press is our chief ideological weapon.”
– Nikita Khrushchev

First published: April 25, 2012

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  A TRIBUTE TO TYPEWRITERS – In praise of the look, feel, and smell of a typed letter.

LAST TIME:  MANAGEMENT A LA 1961  – Some management lessons from the past.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

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MANAGEMENT A LA 1961

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 11, 2017

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

– Some management lessons from the past.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Recently, I was going through some of my father’s old papers back when he worked as Product Planning Manager at Remington Rand in New York City, the makers of the UNIVAC computer at the time. In particular, I came across a training manual entitled, “Creative Management Development” from 1961. Evidently it was used as part of a training class to groom managers for the company. Being curious, I picked through the manual carefully to see the perspective of management back then.

The manual was rather thick and consisted of several sections featuring different lessons. In particular, I came across a chapter entitled, “Elements of Effective Supervision” which included the following:

“The most effective supervisor is the one who…

1. Delegates authority

2. Makes definite assignments and supervises by results

3. Minimized detailed orders

4. Uses low pressure

5. Trains subordinates

6. Does different work from that done by his subordinates

7. Spends his time on long-range rather than short-range problems

This is the pattern of what we call general supervision.

As superiors intrude on matters that rightfully should be handled by their subordinates, problems have a tendency to snowball. One subordinate described the situation this way:

‘As long as the boss gives us the right to make our own decisions, we cooperate with him. We report to him all the information he needs to answer to his boss, but the little things we don’t bother him with. But if he doesn’t give us any freedom we can make his life miserable. We can bombard his office with reports on everything we do. We can refuse to make a decision until we talk to him about it. We can stop saving his time by sifting the important from the unimportant and we can keep him on the run.’ “

Each of the seven sections were then explained in greater detail in the manual. The only problem I had between then and now was the distinction of supervisor versus manager. Whereas I tend to see a supervisor as someone working more closely with workers to assure work is performed properly, I tend to see a manager as more as a leader assessing priorities and plotting direction. Although the chapter referred to a “supervisor,” I believe they were actually describing the duties of a “manager.”

For some rather old management advice from over a half century ago, I found it rather refreshing and interesting. It confirms what we’ve been saying for years, that managers need to learn to manage from the bottom-up, not just top-down. Employees should be properly trained, empowered, and allowed to assume responsibility. In other words, managers should manage more and supervise less, which is just the antithesis of today’s micromanagement philosophy.

The management advice from 1961 is every bit as applicable today as it was back then, making it something we should reconsider. Fascinating.

First published: April 16, 2012

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  MANAGEMENT A LA 1961 – Some management lessons from the past.

LAST TIME:  THE FOUR STEPS FOR AMERICAN SUBVERSION  – A warning from a former KGB agent.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Business, Management | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

OUR CHANGING VALUES

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 9, 2017

BRYCE ON MORALITY

– “You cannot treat a patient if he doesn’t know he is sick.” – Bryce’s Law

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Each year, the Gallup organization checks the pulse of the country’s morality. According to their annual study, for the last few years, many people believe America’s morality is deteriorating. In their May 2017 report, Gallup noted, “Americans continue to express an increasingly liberal outlook on what is morally acceptable, as their views on 10 of 19 moral issues that Gallup measures are the most left-leaning or permissive they have been to date.”

Some people will laugh at this observation, others will look at it more seriously. Coupled with this is the reality of declining attendance and membership in organized religion and traditional civic minded institutions such as Scouting, Freemasonry, Knights of Columbus, and other charitable organizations. This denotes apathy and indifference to the values these organizations embrace. Historically, our values are learned around the dinner table, but parents today have abdicated teaching values to school teachers and the entertainment industry. This reflects a change in parenting skills and a decline in the cohesiveness of the family unit.

Patriotism is also changing. Fewer people are standing for the pledge of allegiance and national anthem, offering a symbolic gesture of protest instead. Some people believe this is an acceptable form of protest, others do not, but it is gaining in notoriety and further dividing the country. There are those who still relish a hometown 4th of July parade with some John Philip Sousa thrown in for good measure. There are others who find this comical and dismiss it out of hand. The same is true when “Taps” is played on Memorial Day or Veterans Day. This denotes a split in our perceptions of what America is suppose to represent and love of country.

There are many other indicators of conflicting values in this country. For example, some state governments are resisting attempts by the federal government to investigate voter fraud. Further, states and cities desperately cling to the concept of Sanctuary Cities, which is commonly viewed by others as havens for illegal immigrant criminals.

It is also worth noting a recent FBI report noting the rise of violent crimes over the last two years (2015, 2016). Such crimes include:

* Murder and non-negligent manslaughter offenses, which increased 8.6%.

* Aggravated assault, which rose 8.6%.

* Rape, which increased 4.9%.

* And robbery, which rose 1.2%.

Overall, the 2016 violent crime rate rose 3.4% as compared with 2015, a significant uptick. Chicago represented the largest metropolitan area for violence, easily outpacing New York City which has approximately three million more people.

So, the question becomes, do these changes in our values represent an improvement or a decline in our society? As indicated by the Gallup study, liberals will see this as positive while conservatives will argue its harmful effects, and therein lies the true reason for divisiveness in America. And when you add intolerance for opposing views, you’ve got a recipe for violence.

If you believe these changes are positive, there is nothing much for you to do as the pendulum is rapidly swinging your way.

However, if you believe these changes are negative, the first thing to do is simply recognize a problem exists. After all, “You cannot treat a patient if he doesn’t know he is sick” (Bryce’s Law). Second, it is time to speak up, either in group settings, in letters to your local newspapers or Congressmen. A dialog about the moral values in this country is long overdue as the country appears confused as to what is right and wrong. For religious and civic minded institutions, such discussions are vital before they close their doors permanently. Apathy and indifference will not suffice, now is the time to act before it is too late. Remember, silence represents acceptance of the status quo.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  MANAGEMENT A LA 1961 – Some management lessons from the past.

LAST TIME:  GAMES WE PLAYED AS KIDS  – Anybody remember “Red Rover”?

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Morality | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

GAMES WE PLAYED AS KIDS

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 6, 2017

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Anybody remember “Red Rover”?

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

It’s interesting what you can learn just sitting on a park bench. Not long ago, I was down at Crystal Beach, a local park and pier on the Gulf of Mexico where I was enjoying some Florida sunshine and waiting for the sunset when I happened to overhear some kids who were bored and looking for something to do. In the course of the conversation they talked about their favorite games; they mentioned: “Call of Duty,” “Batman: Arkham City,” and “Portal 2.” Only then did I realize they were talking about computer video games and got me thinking about the games I played as a child growing up in Connecticut.

Back then, the emphasis was to get out of the house and get some fresh air. We were fortunate to live in a wooded countryside with a stream running through our backyards in the community. We spent a lot of time swimming and fishing in the stream, where we mostly caught brook trout. The only organized sport we played back then was Little League baseball, but it seemed we were always playing a pickup game regardless where we were.

We drove our bicycles everywhere; to school, to the baseball fields, and to the store. One of our favorite endeavors was to canvas the neighborhood to collect used soft drink bottles and take them to the grocery store where we turned them in for the deposit (two cents for a regular bottle, three cents or a nickle for a quart bottle). We would then take the money and play a round of putt-putt golf at a nearby range, and stop off at a country store to buy penny candy; e.g., root beer barrels, paper strips of dots, rock candy, jaw breakers, pixie straws, wax candy, licorice sticks, and a myriad of other delicacies.

Living in a wooded setting, one of our favorite games was Hide and Seek, and we all learned some rather devious places to hide. So much so, it would take a couple of hours to play just a handful of games. We would also play Tag, Red Rover, and Red Light/Green Light. Our fathers tried to teach us “Buck Buck” (aka “Johnny on the Pony”) but this never really caught on with us.

One time, the neighborhood was planning a Clam Bake party and the adults were all charged with various responsibilities, be it preparations, cooking, dessert, entertainment, cleanup or whatever. The father next door was charged with keeping the kids out of everyone’s hair so the adults could do their jobs. To do so, he devised a scavenger hunt whereby he placed clues all over the neighborhood, at certain landmarks in the woods, and at our school. He broke us up into teams to make it competitive. The hunt began in the morning from a massive boulder in his backyard. After he explained the rules, he turned us loose where we had to find the carefully hidden clues and and decipher them which was rather devilish as I recall. This went on for several hours until late in the afternoon where the hunt finally led us back to his boulder in the backyard where he sat enjoying the day by reading a book. We all thought it rather ironic that the hunt ended at the same place it started. He just laughed.

Afterwards, we had dinner and were now too tired to do anything but go to bed, which the parents had hoped for as their Clam Bake was about to begin. Afterwards we realized it was a brilliant bit of strategy by the parents.

There were many other things occupying our time in those days: we whittled, we caught fireflies in mason jars, built forts in the woods, picked apples in a nearby orchard, and played a lot of Dodge Ball (we called it “German Dodge” for some unknown reason). When it rained, a group of us would get together and play marathon sessions of Monopoly. In the winter, we slowed down a bit, but still found time to ride our sleds down hills, ice skating, build snow forts, and of course engage in several snowball fights.

So, as I thought about the young men talking about their video games, I kind of felt sorry for them. Here we were sitting on the Gulf of Mexico on a beautiful day and they were bored. It never occurred to them to drop a fishing line off the pier or even a simple game of catch or “pickle” (running bases). They just wanted to go home and play their favorite video game. I was tempted to teach them how to play Red Rover, but like our fathers who tried to teach us “Buck Buck,” I knew this wouldn’t really catch on with them. Pity.

Whenever I hear a youngster lament, “There’s nothing to do,” I just role my eyes and think back to my youth. There is much more to being a child than just playing with electronic gadgets. Maybe the parents just need to throw the kids outside and force them to discover the world around them.

First published: March 30, 2012

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  OUR CHANGING VALUES – “You cannot treat a patient if he doesn’t know he is sick.” – Bryce’s Law

LAST TIME:  JUMPING TO CONCLUSIONS  – How the Internet has altered the way we argue.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

JUMPING TO CONCLUSIONS

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 4, 2017

BRYCE ON LIFE

– How the Internet has altered the way we argue.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Recently I came across a local news story having to do with road rage. Evidently, two men in their twenties got into a highway dispute in the wee hours of a morning which led to a physical confrontation whereby one man finally pulled out a gun to defend himself and killed the other person. The shooter has not been charged with a crime as he is protected by Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law. This resulted in a firestorm of letters commenting on the story, most criticizing the shooter and claiming the victim was a really nice guy. Interestingly, most of the people springing to the defense of the victim appeared to be of the same age (in their twenties). Those who came to the defense of the shooter appeared to be older. This led to a rather toxic debate on the Internet with the two sides arguing which person was at fault in the incident. So much so, I got the uneasy feeling the issue started to become as ugly as the initial confrontation, maybe more so.

As for me, I felt it was an unfortunate incident but I certainly didn’t have enough information to form an opinion one way or another, just an article where the reporter pieced together a story from law enforcement reports. This is why I was surprised by the vicious discourse resulting from the article. Some of the commentators were familiar with the location where the shooting occurred, some claimed to know one or the other person in the incident, and others played detective or attorney. All had a definite opinion which they fervently argued, some even going so far as to attack anyone possessing an opposing opinion. I was actually more aghast by the comments as opposed to the actual accident itself. Obviously, none of them were present at the time of the incident, nor knew the sequence of events leading up to it, nor the evidence or testimony compiled by the police afterwards, yet they were hellbent on defending their position which struck me as rather strange. The same can also be said about the Trayvon Martin incident where the public became a lynch mob before allowing the police to complete their investigation.

Actually, these incidents typify how Americans tend to argue in the 21st century. It is not so much a matter of civil discourse anymore as it is spin, attack, ridicule, deceive, and assassinate character; a sort of “Sherman’s march to the sea” mentality where everything is destroyed that gets in the way of the person arguing. This approach has been facilitated by the Internet where it is easy to snipe at your opponent under the cloak of anonymity which seems rather cowardly to me. This is why I have always tried to maintain my true identity on the Internet as I am willing to stand by my words. You may not always agree with me, but you know where I stand on an issue.

In both my writings and pursuant correspondence I avoid saying anything I wouldn’t be afraid to say to a person’s face. I know a lot of people on the Internet who cannot make this same claim. I am also mindful of the old axiom, “If you haven’t got anything good to say about a person, do not say it.” As such, I do not engage in arguments where I know the other person is trying to bait me. If I were to take the bait and allow myself to argue in the gutter, I would lose my dignity and respect, which is something my opponent may be willing to risk, but I am not. When it is apparent we are at loggerheads, and we will obviously not change each other’s opinion or perspective, I simply drop the matter recognizing it is futile to continue. In other words, a lot of people need to learn when to “let it go.”

Understand this though, my way of arguing is considered old school. Today’s Internet savvy kids do not possess this school of thought and, consequently, do not abide by any rules whatsoever. As far as they are concerned, all is fair in love and war, and show no restraint in their arguments or ethical compunction. Somewhere along the line we have forgotten that arguments are a very personal form of communications. We can either do it with a little style and respect for the other party, or simply go for the jugular. Unfortunately, the era of gentlemanly debate ended with the 20th century. It may be considered a bygone era, but we didn’t have quite as many Road Rage incidents back then either.

First published: October 4, 2012

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  GAMES WE PLAYED AS KIDS – Anybody remember “Red Rover”?

LAST TIME:  WHY THE REPUBLICANS IN CONGRESS ARE BLOWING IT  – They only have themselves to blame.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

WHY THE REPUBLICANS IN CONGRESS ARE BLOWING IT

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 3, 2017

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– They only have themselves to blame.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

It’s not much of a secret Americans are growing frustrated with the slow pace of the Republican led Congress, particularly members of their own party. It was hoped legislation would be on the president’s desk immediately following his inauguration to repeal and replace Obamacare. It wasn’t. Instead, the House and Senate fumbled the ball and the bill stagnated until the Graham-Cassidy Bill which still doesn’t solve the problem effectively. Even though they campaigned for several years to oust Obamacare, they have suddenly come down with an acute case of the stupids.

Now in October, it was hoped we would have also rewritten the tax code by now, passed the 2018 budget, and addressed the construction of the southern border wall. Alas, nothing. Even though Republicans control both chambers of Congress, they give the distinct impression they are reluctant to do anything. The question is, Why?

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell claims the President doesn’t understand how the Congress works, that there are political protocols to be observed. In contrast, the President is perfectly cognizant of the political gymnastics involved, but ran into a stumbling block of a lethargic Congress. On the campaign trail, he repeatedly called out the Congressional establishment of both parties by saying it was time to “drain the swamp.” This was a slogan the American public embraced and helped catapult the President to the White House.

The slow pace of today’s Congress lies in sharp contrast to the “Contract with America,” offered in 1994 by then Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich with Dick Armey. Back then, the Republicans articulated an agenda and made sweeping reforms. Not so today. The reason is simple, establishment Republicans consider the Trump agenda a threat to their political existence.

Instead of rallying around the President, Congressional politicians are primarily concerned with getting re-elected in the 2018 midterm elections. As such, they see Mr. Trump’s populist agenda as a political football which they are hesitant to run with. Because of the controversy surrounding the President, GOP politicians perceive Mr. Trump as a political liability, not an asset. If they support the President, they are convinced the news media and “resistance” movement will unseat them. They also believe if they can demonstrate their independence, their chances for winning re-election will improve, and this is where they are wrong.

It is rare to have a single party control both the executive and legislative branches of government at the same time. When this happens, it is presumed they will work together to achieve goals such as those in the “Contract with America.” Whereas Mr. Trump has undone a lot of the Obama-era executive orders, he is frustrated by a Congress that moves painfully slow. The Congress knows what Mr. Trump wants, as based on his “Contract with the American Voter,” they are just hesitant to give it to him as they perceive it as a threat to their livelihood.

The Republicans were aghast Mr. Trump recently sat down with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer in September to work out deals on hurricane relief, DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) and border security. First, negotiating with the opposing party is something a President should do, as exemplified by Ronald Reagan in the 1980’s and Bill Clinton in the 1990’s. Unfortunately, Barack Obama did not follow suit. Second, the President has grown frustrated with the inability of the Congressmen from his own party to get anything done, so talking with the opposition seems rather obvious. According to polls, it appears the American people agree with him. It is pretty sad when the President has to battle members of his own party as well as the opposition, but such is the state of politics in Washington, DC.

Should the Republicans lose the Senate and/or the House in 2018, they will only have themselves to blame, not the President. Instead of bucking his agenda, they should seize the day. The American people are tired of talk and desperately want the type of decisive action Mr. Trump campaigned on. So far, they haven’t seen it in 2017 and view Congressional Republicans as roadblocks, not movers and shakers.

Congressional Republicans are having difficulty coming to grips that it is a new day in American politics. As evidenced by Mr. Trump’s victory, the populace no longer accepts the status quo. Should Congress continue snubbing the President they will continue to be perceived as a part of the Washington “establishment” which will ultimately cost them their re-election. As much as they may hate the President, they do not seem to grasp their political future is dependent on him. They must decide to either rally around the President or face losing their jobs in the midterm elections.

This exhibition of weakness by the GOP will haunt the party for years to come. As long as they continue to think short term, their tenure as leaders of the Congress will be brief. All because they want to thwart someone perceived to be an outsider of their political clique.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  JUMPING TO CONCLUSIONS – How the Internet has altered the way we argue.

LAST TIME:  INTUITIVENESS, THE SIXTH SENSE  – Some recognition for the Radar O’Reillys of the world.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

INTUITIVENESS, THE SIXTH SENSE

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 2, 2017

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Some recognition for the Radar O’Reillys of the world.

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In just about any job interview, managers look at applicants for such things as skills and proficiencies, intelligence level, their ability to listen and learn, and a variety of other attributes. One aspect they are particularly interested in is the intuitiveness of the person which is difficult to quantify and substantiate. Just about all managers hope the new worker possesses this important “sixth sense” which helps to spot problems before they occur and take corrective action. One of the best icons for intuitiveness was Corporal Radar O’Reilly of M.A.S.H. fame, who would process paperwork and take care of the camp’s business before the Colonel could issue the orders. As efficient as Radar was, he was the exception as opposed to the rule in the camp. The same is true in business.

Over the years I have met several Radar O’Reilly-types in the I.T. industry, most assuming clerical roles. In the past, they may have been secretaries, librarians, project administrators, or even systems analysts. The point is, they weren’t high on the totem pole, yet everyone in the department was acutely aware of their ability to overcome administrative obstacles, particularly the boss who understood the employee’s value and developed a dependence on it. It’s not that such employees possess any special knowledge, as much as they know how to conquer problems. In the process, they make themselves invaluable to the department, thereby guaranteeing job security.

From my perspective, there are three attributes that make up such a person:

1. They know their systems inside and out. Such insight, coupled with experience gives them the confidence they need to properly take action. They have either made all of the mistakes, and suffered the consequences from them, or are at least cognizant of the ramifications for making such mistakes.

2. They have an innate desire to please which is what motivates them. It seems they are trying to prove something to someone, particularly a superior, that they know how to do their job and make it look effortless.

3. They possess an empathy for human needs. Such people understand what it means to be frustrated by a problem and, as a result, they are quick to respond to people to either ease their pain or make them feel more comfortable. Bottom-line, they are caring people who are willing to extend a helping hand.

Years ago, when we were starting our company in Cincinnati, we needed to make a sales presentation to a company in Louisville. At the time, we used transparencies and needed a portable overhead transparency projector to take with us. Anticipating the need, we went through normal channels to order a 3M projector two weeks before the presentation. The sales rep assured us he could deliver it to us with plenty of time to spare. Days came and went until we were just two days before the presentation and we still had not received the projector. Our sales rep had fumbled the order and we were at a loss as to what to do. In desperation, we called the President of 3M in Minneapolis. His secretary answered the phone and explained the president was busy; was there something she could help us with? We explained our dilemma to which she replied, “Oh dear, I understand your problem, please leave it to me.”

The very next morning, just 24 hours before our presentation in Louisville, a delivery truck arrived with our precious projector. Frankly, we were overwhelmed how efficiently the secretary had solved our problem, which she made look simple. Being grateful, we wrote a letter to the president of 3M, thanking his secretary for solving our problem and complimented her on the professional manner in which she solved the problem. Realizing the secretary was probably charged with opening and organizing the president’s mail, we can only assume the letter ended up at the top of his stack.

It’s a special sort of person who possesses intuitiveness and, frankly, I’m not quite sure how to determine this during a job interview. Quite often, intuitiveness is nothing more than experience in disguise, but I tend to believe it goes beyond this and requires some specific human related factors such as empathy and a desire to please. Whatever it is, such people are to be cherished as they make life easier for the rest of us. It would be a big mistake to take such people for granted. In fact, you should probably do as we did with the 3M secretary, thank them.

First published: December 4, 2012

Keep the Faith!

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Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

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