THE BRYCE IS RIGHT!

Software for the finest computer – The Mind

  • Tim’s YouTube Channel

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,004 other followers

  • Categories

  • Fan Page

  • Since 1971:
    "Software for the finest computer - The Mind"

    Follow me on Twitter: @timbryce

  • Subscribe

Archive for December, 2020

2020 YEAR-END WRAP-UP

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 22, 2020

BRYCE ON BRYCE

– My most popular columns and audio segments this year.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

This is my last column for the year as I prepare to enjoy the holidays and rest up for 2021. As has become customary, I’m using this opportunity to review my top essays from the past year.

As you know, I write on a variety of subjects, such as management, systems, technology, social issues, politics, and observations of our changing world. Sometimes my work is instructional and informative, other times it is controversial or humorous. I certainly hope it isn’t boring. By the number of subscribers I have, their comments, and the hits I have on my web sites, I do not believe this is the case.

This has been a fiery political year and, as such, my political columns did very well. Nonetheless, what follows is based on my “hits” on my web pages.

My top columns for the year were:

1. IN PRAISE OF THE BBQ PIT BOYS – By far, this was the favorite of my readers and I was pleased to see it win, even though I was bit surprised by its popularity. I think it was the subject matter that made it a success, slow cooking, or perhaps the “The BBQ Pit Boys” show itself is so popular, I rode on their coattails. Either way, I was glad to see people enjoy this essay on the enjoyment of BBQ.

2. WHAT HAPPENS IF TRUMP LOSES? – This was my most popular political piece, which people are still reading five months after I released it.

3. AS FLORIDA GOES, SO GOES THE COUNTRY – This was my last column before the 2020 election. In it, I accurately predicted Florida would go to President Trump. I had thought Florida would set the tone for the swing states, and I may still be right, providing we ever find out about the fraudulent voting.

4. WHO IS REALLY DIVIDING THE COUNTRY? – This was also published shortly before the election. In this one, I contended America hate was not generated from President Trump, as the news media claims, but by the far left instead.

5. BEWARE OF THE LINCOLN PROJECT – Another political essay which described a group of former “Republicans” bent on seeing President Trump removed from office. These were actually Democrats in disguise.

6. THE AFTEREFFECTS OF THE 2020 ELECTION – Some predictions of what to expect following the 2020 elections.

7. THE LOSS OF A SPOUSE – reflections on the pain of losing a spouse, something I experienced not long ago.

8. I WILL NOT FORGET – written in July, this represented a listing of the accomplishments of the president, as well as the roadblocks thrown up by the Democrats. Something I realized afterwards is that Americans have a short attention span.

9. ARE WE BETTER OFF UNDER TRUMPONOMICS? – As evidenced by a Gallup Poll in February, the answer is “Yes.”

10. THE POLITICAL CONSEQUENCES OF GEORGE FLOYD – This represented the kickoff to the “Summer of Hate.”

HONORABLE MENTION

AN OPEN LETTER TO GOP CANDIDATES

CAPITALISM VERSUS SOCIALISM: DO YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE?

JOE BIDEN’S DILEMMA

10 TIPS FOR CONFRONTING THE NEWS MEDIA

WHERE DOES THE GOP GO FROM HERE?

I also provide an audio version of most of my columns for those people on the go, courtesy of YouTube. I would like to believe people listen to me at the gym or beach, but more realistically, people tend to tune in while they are traveling or at work. Interestingly, the popularity of my audio segments is not the same as my written columns.

AUDIO SEGMENTS ON YOUTUBE

1. WHAT HAPPENS IF TRUMP LOSES? – Like the printed version, this was my top political piece.

2. BEWARE OF THE LINCOLN PROJECT – Also a favorite, just like the printed version.

3. THE AFTEREFFECTS OF THE 2020 ELECTION – This is still taking hits.

4. AS FLORIDA GOES, SO GOES THE COUNTRY – a lot of people tuned in to hear my prediction.

5. UNITY? DON’T MAKE ME LAUGH – Something former VP Joe Biden claims he wants, but people know better.

6. IN PRAISE OF THE BBQ PIT BOYS – This segment did well, but nothing like the printed version.

7. WHO IS REALLY DIVIDING THE COUNTRY? – An important piece which did well.

8. I WILL NOT FORGET! – both the printed and audio versions took the #8 spot.

9. THE AFTEREFFECTS OF THE 2020 ELECTION – listing predictions pursuant to the election.

10. THE SUMMER OF HATE – Interestingly, the audio version did better than the printed counterpart.

HONORABLE MENTION

DEMOCRACY VERSUS REPUBLIC: DO YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE?

HOW IS THE FIGHT FOR FLORIDA SHAPING UP?

THE SHOW MUST GO ON

WHERE DOES THE HATE COME FROM?

THE IMPEACHMENT CHARADE IS FINALLY OVER

I will be on sabbatical for awhile until I am ready to get back in the saddle. Merry Christmas.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE. These make great holiday gifts!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

CONDUCTING A MEETING FOR A NONPROFIT

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 17, 2020

BRYCE ON NONPROFITS

– Some commonsense do’s and don’ts to assist you.

NOTE: The following is an excerpt from my book, “How to Run a Nonproft,” a great gift idea for people starting on a Board of Directors for the new year.

Like it or not, the main business of a nonprofit is to conduct meetings, be it a regularly scheduled meeting for the membership, a ceremony or presentation of awards, a Board of Directors meeting, a convention, committee meetings, dinners, socials, etc. Let us also recognize nobody wants to waste time by attending an inconsequential meeting. Poorly executed meetings are the number one reason for declining attendance which ultimately affects membership. After all, if the meeting is bad, the member will not waste precious time attending and will look for other venues of interest to him.

There is nothing magical about conducting a good meeting. It just requires a little preparation, along with some leadership and structure during its execution. Here are some simple guidelines to follow:

1. Start and end on time. Not a minute before or after. This includes not waiting for someone who is running late thereby creating a problem for others. This is simply discourteous. I am reminded of Mahatma Gandhi who said, “Being late is an act of violence, an act of terrorism, because you unnerve people.” I tend to agree.

2. Follow an agenda. Print it up and distribute it accordingly, preferably prior to the meeting so others can prepare themselves accordingly.

Sample Agenda

DATE/TIME:

Dress:  Business Casual

Note:  If you have a question, stand and wait to be recognized by the President.

Location:  Chapter Building, address

I.  Opening

A.  Call to order
B.  Invocation & Pledge of Allegiance
C.  Roll Call
D.  Establishment of a Quorum
E.  Review of Sickness & Distress & Deaths
F.  Introduction of VIPs.
G.  Introduction of Past Presidents & Committee Chairmen
H.  Introduction of First Time Visitors
I.  Welcoming remarks by the President

II.  Administration

A.  Reading and approval of the minutes of the last meeting
B.  Reading of correspondence
C.  Reading of Treasurer's Report - motion to attach to the minutes
D.  Review Bills Pending & motion to pay them
E.  Reading and approval of Committee Reports

III.  Presentations

A.  Awards for service & accomplishments
B.  Charities & scholarships

IV.  Old Business

A.  Vote on new members
B.  Chapter Building Maintenance Project
C.  Community Cleanup project
D.  Revisions to Budget

V.  New Business

A.  Review membership applications
B.  Assign members investigations*
C.  Initiate new members
D.  Cleanup of kitchen to comply with new health codes
E.  Questions & proposals from the floor

VI.  Closing

A.  Review activity list/punch list & schedule of events
B.  Review preliminary minutes for this meeting
C.  Benediction
D.  Motion to adjourn

3. Follow the old military principle of: “Tell them what you are going to tell them; Tell them, and then; Tell them what you’ve told them.” Developing a punch-list of action items at the conclusion of the meeting can be very useful for certain situations.

4. Introductions are important so participants know the cast of characters involved and their interests. But do not waste an inordinate amount of time here. Also, name tags or name cards are useful to avoid the embarrassment of forgetting names and titles.

5. I am not a big fan of histrionics. Many lecturers like people to get up, stretch, shake hands with everyone or hold a group hug. This can be downright embarrassing to people. Get to the point and move on.

6. Maintain order to eliminate distractions and focus on business. Got a gavel? Use one. Haven’t got one? Get one. No, you do not have to be Attila the Hun to run a meeting, just someone with a little common sense, patience, discipline, and a sense of fairness. If this sounds like a baseball umpire, it is.

7. Make the meeting meaningful and interesting. Avoid repetition, boring subjects and boring speakers. Make the meeting something people “want” to attend as opposed to feeling compelled to do so. Make them feel like they are getting their money’s worth.

As mentioned, nobody wants to attend an inconsequential meeting. If treated frivolously, people will become apathetic and attendance will drop. I can remember my homeowner association board of directors meeting would literally go on for hours with nothing of any substance resulting from it. When I finally assumed the presidency, I set new records for conducting such meetings. Instead of hours wasted, I completed the business of the association in less than an hour. The first time I did this, one member of the board asked, “You mean, we’re done?” After I confirmed his suspicions, I invited him to have a libation at a nearby watering hole.

One last point, I have little use for people who come to meetings unprepared. If you serve on a Board of Directors, regardless of how frivolous it may seem, you are doing a disservice to it by coming to a meeting unprepared. And for God’s sake, bring a pen or pencil and something to take notes on. Only an idiot comes to a meeting without anything to write with or on.

ROBERT’S RULES OF ORDER

Robert’s Rules of Order, or simply Robert’s Rules, is the most commonly used guideline for parliamentary procedure and applies to meetings of just about every nonprofit imaginable. Want to bring order to Board and general meetings? Buy a copy for all of your officers and have them study it. Interestingly, some nonprofits make a point out of avoiding Robert’s Rules and leave control of the meeting to the discretion of the person holding the gavel, usually the president. Not surprising, such nonprofits typically default back to Robert’s Rules as they do not know how to run a meeting otherwise.

PUNCH LISTS

The term “punch list” comes from the field of construction and is used to enumerate items yet to be completed. A punch list is also a useful tool to remind a nonprofit of items to be performed and should be updated at the conclusion of a meeting, be it a general membership meeting, a board meeting, or a committee meeting. For each item on the list, it should mention not only the activity to be performed, but also who is assigned to the task and when it needs to be be completed by (a date). This reminds people of their responsibilities.

If something has been completed, take it off the list. In other words, a punch list in a nonprofit is an on-going document.

DECORUM

When announcing an upcoming meeting, it is wise to notify the participants not only the date, time and place, but the dress code for the meeting, and the rules to be observed, for example, use of a gavel to bring order to the meeting, stand and be recognized to ask a question or make a statement, how the meeting will follow an agenda, etc. By specifying the decorum of the meeting, you are helping to prohibit people from making a faux pas which may embarrass them, you are bringing order to the meeting, thereby expediting its execution.

AVOID POLITICS

People attend nonprofit meetings to escape the politics and drudgery of work during the day. Instead, they want to come, relax, and enjoy themselves. The last thing they want to hear is political bickering among officers at a nonprofit meeting. It is highly recommended you keep a tight lid on any political shenanigans, gossip, or accusations during meetings. Otherwise, you may very well scare away people. This happens far too frequently. It’s ugly, and it’s unnecessary.

REVIEW

All meetings should be reviewed, either formally or informally, to determine its success. Informal reviews are used for short meetings to determine action items to be followed up on. Formal reviews should be considered for all lengthy meetings. Standard critique sheets should be used for attendees and the leader to evaluate the meeting. Prepare a summary and evaluate the meeting’s success. More importantly, learn from the comments received. There is little point of going through the motions of a review if you have no intention of acting on it.

Here is a sample Meeting Critique Sheet:

1.  Meeting date _____

2.  Are you a member or a guest?

a.  If a member, how many years have you belonged?

3.  Was the meeting well controlled and run smoothly?  If not, why?

4.  What was the BEST part of this meeting?

5.  What was the WORST part of this meeting?

6.  Do you have any RECOMMENDATIONS for improving our meetings?

7.  Do you want to help the Chapter in some capacity?  If so, how?

8.  Other comments _____

9.  Name (optional) - telephone - e-mail.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR COMMENTS!

Try this a few times and you might find the comments most illuminating.

PROGRAMMING & CALENDARS

A business meeting will always follow a pattern and should be managed accordingly. A general meeting of the membership, may feature a speaker or special subject. In this situation, avoid repetition and don’t let it become boring. Use your imagination and try something new. Here in Florida, we have many “snowbirds” visit us during the winter time. As such, I belong to groups who cater to our “snowbird” visitors and put on programs to suit their interests. Can’t find a speaker, how about a video instead? Someday I’ll have to tell you about the “Spamfest” I scheduled for dinner one night, or poetry reading. We had a lot of people attend.

The point is, use your imagination. Perhaps you might want to select an educational topic, review a special project, or recognize a special member for length of service. If this means trying something new, so be it. Let it never be said the programs of the group are monotonous.

Selecting dates for your events is very important. Attendance depends on not scheduling an event in competition with another nearby venue or a better subject. Research those activities that may pose a problem in scheduling; for example:

* Federal/National/Religious Holidays.

* Public School Events – for holidays and vacations. After all, parents like to schedule getaways at this time. Also, pay particular attention to graduation days and key sporting events.

* Local College – vacations and Spring breaks.

* The events of other nearby nonprofits of a similar nature.

* District, state and national meetings of your nonprofit. Quite often, a national organization will hold meetings and national conventions.

* Sporting events, such as Baseball’s opening day, All-Star game, or World Series, or; special Football, Basketball, Hockey, Golf, Nascar events, etc.

* Local community events – such as arts and crafts fairs, parades, town festivals, or special events, e.g., in my area, the Scottish games is a popular event. Be sure to check the local Chamber of Commerce schedule.

* Monitor business calendars for conventions.

* Consider birthdays and anniversaries of VIPs in your area.

Use these events to determine a suitable schedule for the programming year. Free computer calendars are available to help you record your schedule and publish it to your membership, either in printed form or via the Internet.

TRACKING ATTENDANCE

It is wise to track attendance at meetings during the year. Computer spreadsheets are useful in this regards. Simply note the meeting’s date, and who attended; for example:

JAN 12	JAN 14	JAN 19	FEB 02	FEB 09	FEB 18	FEB 25	MAR 03	MAR 10
BOARD	MEMBER	BOARD	MEMBER	BOARD	MEMBER	BOARD	MEMBER	BOARD
Snowbird			Spamfest
Night
Members		8	52	7	65	8	51	8	68	8
1st Time Visit.	1	4	0	2	2	3	0	5	1
Return Visitors	2	8	4	11	2	3	1	12	1
TOTALS	 	11	64	11	78	12	57	9	85	10

AVERAGES	BOARD	MEMBER
Members		7.6	53.6
1st Time Visit.	2.2	3.2
Return Visitors	3.4	6.3
TOTALS		13.2	69.1

You may also want to track scores from the Meeting Critique Sheets mentioned above.

By tracking attendance, we can spot highs and lows, perhaps due to programming, the master of ceremonies, or some incident occurring such as an important vote. From this, we can improve programming of the meetings. However, if you have no intent on changing, regardless what the data reveals, there is little point in maintaining such a spreadsheet.

CONCLUSION

Mastering the execution of an effective meeting requires a little planning, a little organization, and a lot of management. Bottom-line, how do you know if your meeting was a success? People do not groan the next time you call one.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE. These make great holiday gifts!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

A HUGE CIVICS LESSON

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 15, 2020

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– What the 2020 election is teaching us.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

These are historical times, and if you are not paying attention, you are going to miss something. Of course, I’m talking about the 2020 presidential election, and the ensuing investigation for fraudulent voting. This will be discussed by historians for the next several decades and perhaps beyond. This easily overshadows the 1960 election between Kennedy and Nixon, as well as the 2000 election between Bush and Gore. All of this was preceded by the “Summer of Hate,” which was much more intense than the 1960’s.

The only beneficial byproduct of 2020 is that it is forcing Americans to finally learn civics. This is why I consider 2020 a huge civics lesson for America, something they should have understood all along, but took our electoral process for granted. People are only now starting to figure out the genius of the Electoral College, such as how it is used to represent all the people, not just those living in the major urban areas.

People are also starting to comprehend the need for “checks and balances” between the three branches of government, and the role of the 12th Amendment should no candidate get more than the minimum 270 electoral votes. And they are most definitely learning of the dangers resulting from voter fraud.

I recently talked with three naturalized citizens about their impressions of the helter-skelter of the 2020 elections. One was from the Ukraine, one from Albania, and another from Greece. I found their take on the subject interesting. All three left their countries to realize the “American Dream” and had gone through the process of becoming American citizens. They were excited to naturalize as they perceived America as the source of opportunity, liberty and fair play. However, the 2020 elections caused them to change their perspectives.

The Ukrainian said the elections made those in her native land look good, and you have to remember, her’s was a country notorious for corruption, but is now cleaning up its act.

The Albanian said he was not allowed to vote in his own country, as everything was prearranged in advance by the regime, not by the people. To be able to vote in a fair and transparent process appealed to him greatly. Because of the hubbub over the 2020 election though, he is losing confidence in America’s ability to conduct an election. He also has a problem with the news media who, he believes, is twisting and turning the truth to suit political needs. Like many Americans, he no longer trusts the press.

The Greek claimed the elections in his native country are worse than the American version, but not by much. He considers the Greek elections corrupt and believes the Americans are going down the same path, causing him to lose confidence in the country.

All three understand the basic principles of American government, something they learned from their naturalization process, but all are disappointed in the madness of the 2020 election. From their perspective, America’s reputation is being tarnished by the election, the two warring political parties, and the news media. They have trouble understanding why the greatest country on Earth is acting like a bunch of boobs. To them, it’s embarrassing.

It should also be embarrassing to all Americans, but it is not. This is an ideological clash so severe, one cannot figure out how we will survive without some form of bloodshed. Like I said, this is something for the historians to figure out years from now. In the meantime, learn your civics!

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE. These make great holiday gifts!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

TALKING TO YOURSELF

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 10, 2020

BRYCE ON AGING

– What it says about you.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

NOTE: The following is an excerpt from my book, “Tim’s Senior Moments,” a great gift idea for parents this holiday season.

I have noticed as I get older I have developed a habit of talking to myself. Other friends of mine have commented they have done likewise. It would be rather cheeky to say it is the most intelligent conversation of the day, but this is not what I’m getting at.

With me, I think it began years ago while driving around town. Because of all of the northerners who visit the Sunshine State, Florida has some of the most eclectic driving habits around. Evidently, how they teach driving in the Midwest is noticeably different than how they teach it in the East or Canada. This is very frustrating to the natives, such as myself, who often lose patience with other drivers and let loose with a salty tongue of expletives voicing their displeasure.

Naturally, as we get older, we are not as nimble as we once were and might suffer from basic body aches caused by arthritis or whatever the ailment du jour is. Consequently, we are susceptible to bashing ourselves into walls, stubbing toes, and bruising ourselves in the process. When we hit the deck in the morning, we feel our bones and muscles pop into place. None of this is beneficial to our demeanor and we start the day as a bit of a curmudgeon.

We also find simple tasks are no longer simple. For example, I used to be able to change a car battery in just a few short minutes, but thanks to today’s engineering and safety standards, it has become a complicated procedure, like performing a frontal lobotomy that now takes a couple of hours to perform and causes your patience to wear thin. Technology was supposed to simplify our lives, but I find it only complicates it.

With this in mind, we find ourselves becoming impatient with inanimate objects. To illustrate, I have a Kia with man-eating car doors. No matter what I do, I cannot seem to get the door to stay open as I enter or exit the vehicle. I think the Koreans have trained it to intentionally rip my legs off. Naturally, I become irritated with it, and begin to argue with it, e.g.; “Will you just stay put?” I demand. Of course, it pretends to not hear me and continues to ride my leg.

When I am dressing or undressing, I might reprimand an article of clothing or shoe for not fitting or buttoning properly, e.g.; “Will you just get off of me?”

As you work in the kitchen to cook a new recipe you read in a magazine, you try to follow the directions carefully but somehow it doesn’t turn out the way you had imagined, e.g.; “Why, this tastes like s***!” Naturally, you see yourself as the victim and not the cause of the snafu.

At night, a body ache of some form, such as a muscle or joint, might throb thereby preventing sleep. I admonish them as if they were my kids when they were little, “Will you knock it off and go to sleep!”

The interesting part of arguing with an inanimate object is that you never win. It may be nice to vent your frustration, but such talk says more about ourselves than anything else. When you curse an inanimate object, you are actually cursing yourself. The object is not a thinking entity, you are, and the fact you are quarreling with it means you no longer know how to deal with it anymore.

Now, about this stupid computer…

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE. These make great holiday gifts!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

LIVING IN A NEWS VACUUM

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 8, 2020

BRYCE ON AMERICAN JOURNALISM

– And turning the public into reporters.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

As we all know, one cannot survive in a physical vacuum as our bodies require air. Nor can we make intelligent decisions in a news vacuum void of honest journalism, thereby falling prey to propagandists. Admittedly, American journalism was founded on political opinion as many different newspapers spun the news as far back as the 18th century. However, nobody at the time made a coordinated effort to control the news as there were many different players involved at the time.

I have been a news junkie since I was young. Tragically, I now find I am on my own. Since the 2020 election I lost all respect for the news media and simply do not trust them. This includes newspapers, radio and TV, and social media. Truth and trust is what is at stake here.

I grew up with the New York Times and Chicago Tribune, both of which I thought were reliable. As our family moved, we also embraced the Cincinnati Enquirer, and the St. Petersburg Times (now Tampa Bay Times). They too seemed reliable at the time, but now their slanted reporting is overbearing. There have been so many factual inconsistencies and political spin in their reporting, I no longer consider them a reliable source of information. I simply do not trust them. Frankly, Russia’s Pravda newspaper is probably more reliable. I consider this rather sad as I am one of the last generations who relished reading a newspaper at the kitchen table over a cup of coffee. Alas, no more.

In terms of radio, I used to enjoy listening to the news from CBS and ABC while driving in my car (I can still remember their musical intros). For some reason, NBC didn’t seem to be a major player here. Regardless, these news sources appeared authoritative and trustworthy, but those days are long gone.

For TV, I was a Huntley-Brinkley man (NBC) for many years, and took their reporting to the bank. John Chancellor followed and did a capable job. However, when Tom Brokow took over, I sensed political spin creeping into the broadcast. Then along came Brian Williams and NBC lost my trust forever. I followed Fox News for the last few years, but they lost me with their coverage of the 2020 election, as did a lot of people who left in disgust. CNN and MSNBC are non-entities to me. After a political speech, I would often tune into them to see how they translated it. The speech I watched was nothing like what they interpreted. It was like matching English to Swahili; I hadn’t a clue what they were talking about. Bye-bye TV news.

Then came the era of social media which originally was considered a great way to communicate to groups of people. Unfortunately, social media giants began to flex their muscles and censored conservative news and opinion. So much for the 1st Amendment. Such censorship caused people to look elsewhere on the Internet for free speech. It also meant the Social giants were controlling the news and political opinion. This is what we call in the biz, “propaganda” (see Joseph Goebbels), it certainly cannot be construed as legitimate journalism. This brings up a point, the manipulation of the news is likely run by some diabolical person, like Goebbels. George Soros perhaps?

To my way of thinking, there is no longer a reliable source for news in this country. Everything is written to fit a specific political ideology. This forces the average American to seek out news on their own. We should all resent being forced to become reporters as we just do not have time for this. However, this is our only alternative as there is no longer legitimate journalism being exercised in this country.

What we are witnessing is not just a change in the political landscape, but a change in our overall culture; A change in the American way of life.

This is why I contend we are living in a news vacuum, thereby making us more controllable. Huntley-Brinkley would be spinning in their graves if they knew what was going on, and I’m sure Goebbels would love to run Google, Twitter and Facebook. I can imagine him drooling all over his keyboard.

I would like to believe now is a good time for a new journalism syndicate to emerge and challenge the status quo, an entity based on honesty and integrity. The reality though, it is hard to derail a system fueled by politics, such as the $11B from the 2020 election, along with a decline of our moral values which accepts the current mode of operation.

Mark my words: We need to change the system before the system changes us.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE. These make great holiday gifts!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | 3 Comments »

RETIREMENTLAND

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 3, 2020

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Do we ever truly retire?

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

NOTE: The following is an excerpt from my book, “Tim’s Senior Moments,” a great gift idea for parents this holiday season.

I have written about retirement in the past and I still regard it as a mystery. I have had more friends “check out” recently for a variety of reasons. They all claim to be happy to be retired, that they have been planning it for years, and that I am a chump to keep working. I consider this all a bald-faced lie. I’ve seen some become musicians, where they play pickup gigs. I’ve seen others become golfers, playing the same course over and over again like a gerbil on a treadmill. And they all seem to be obsessed with Viagra or Cialis for some reason.

Perhaps the hardest part of retirement is adjusting to the pace. At first, most men treat it like a vacation, but they quickly learn it is a vacation that never ends. Initially, they tend to get more rest, eat a little more than they should, take a trip, putter around the house tackling minor assignments, but then they become bored and restless. Instead of having someone set a schedule for them, like their company and boss, now they have to make their own schedule.

Retirement seems to turn executives into gardeners where they spend countless hours turning their property into lush Japanese gardens. At parties, they argue who has the best “Shishi-odoshi” in their “Koi” ponds to scare away deer. I also think they learn the language as part of this process. They have been known to blurt out words and expressions like, “Hai,” “non desu ka,” “Ohayou gozaimasu,” “douzo, and “domo.”

Some prefer cultivating vegetable gardens, complete with bib overalls and a straw hat. Somehow I am reminded of Eddie Albert. Tomatoes, corn, and cucumbers are common. The more ambitious farmers try their hand at such things as kale, cabbage, bok choy, okra, snow peas, and a variety of hot peppers. Normally, these are tried only once before reverting back to tomatoes, corn, and cucumbers. For some strange reason, broccoli is avoided at all costs.

At high school reunions I would hear classmates boast they were going to retire soon. They do this in such a way as to make it sound like a game, whereby the winner is the person who retires first. They looked forward to sleeping in during the mornings, travel to exotic locations, or catch up on their reading. Inevitably, they find their body is conditioned to sleep a few scant hours and they still rise before sunup, they rarely travel outside of the county, and the only reading they do is in the bathroom. If anything, they become addicted to television shows like “Jerry Springer,” “The View,” and “Dr. Phil.” Not surprising, they develop the habit of talking back to the television screen as if the host could hear them. The only thing stranger is when they offer applause to the television set.

The retirees start attending breakfasts and lunches with former colleagues. Inevitably old war stories are told over and over again. Breakfast usually consists of eggs, bacon, pork sausage, goetta, scrapple, pancakes, biscuits and gravy, grits, hash browns, and coffee, lots of coffee. Lunches usually includes pastrami, corned beef, hamburgers, chicken wings, and an occasional glass of beer or wine. It is no small wonder they begin to gain weight. There is also the ceremonial toothpick afterwards. They suddenly find themselves volunteering time to charitable organizations and political campaigns. And they spend an inordinate amount of time in doctor offices, where they develop an interest in women magazines.

Retirees discover they miss the socialization they enjoyed at work, which is why they gravitate to group meetings. They realize it is important to their mental health to be able to discuss current events and their observations on life. Without such discussions they become despondent.

To keep busy, it is not unusual for them to go to the post office, not just once, but twice a day (once in the morning and later in the afternoon). They also go for haircuts at dawn. Rarely do they really need a haircut as their hair is now thin. More importantly, it is to manicure the wild hairs growing in their eyebrows, ears, and nose. They also spend considerable time at sporting events for their grandchildren, where they can catch up on their sleep.

More importantly, I’ve noticed my friends who recently retired get bored easily. Although they pledged to live a life of ease, one by one I see them all going back to take on a job of some kind. Maybe not as rigorous as before, but necessary to practice mental gymnastics. I’ve seen some people become clerks at some of the home and garden superstores, others work at golf courses, and some go back to what they were doing before retiring. Frankly, I do not know anyone who has dropped out completely. Somehow, they all find a way to go back to work. Maybe retirement is not what they thought it would be.

In spite of all this, I am considered the “oddball” for continuing to work. I still enjoy meeting and working with people; I still enjoy jousting in debate, but more than anything, I still believe I have a role to play and am not ready for the curtain to fall. Besides, I look kind of silly wearing a hardware store apron.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

SHOULD BUSINESS LEADERS RUN THE COUNTRY?

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 1, 2020

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– As I wrote in 2011, there are complications.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Back in June 2011 I wrote a column titled, “Why Business Leaders Scare People.” This was triggered by then-private citizen Donald Trump considering a run for the 2012 presidential election, which eventually went to Mitt Romney as the Republican candidate who failed to take down President Obama. Prior to this, we hadn’t a true businessman run for president, except for possibly Herbert Hoover who was a geologist and understood mining. The intent of my column back then was to consider whether the American people would support such a business person. In reading the article nine years later, I consider it rather prophetic.

I wrote, “When it looked like Donald Trump was going to throw his hat into the presidential ring not long ago, it electrified everyone including his supporters, opponents, and the Main Stream Media. His blunt talk was refreshing to his supporters and scared the hell out of everyone else. The Main Stream Media went right to work undermining his bid as they started to believe he could take down the president (Obama). He was ridiculed for everything from his hair, to his clothes, to his talk. The fact remains though, Trump scared them to death. Now I am not here to defend Donald Trump or explain his exit from the political stage. I’m not even a fan of his popular television show, ‘The Celebrity Apprentice.’ It is his image as a successful businessman who wanted to correct the ills of the country, and the reaction that ensued, which intrigues me. This is not so much about Trump as it is about any business leader who would want to be taken seriously on the political stage.”

I went on to describe the three traits making a business leader successful:

“1. Is entrepreneurial in spirit, a visionary who knows how to recognize opportunity and capitalize on it and in the process is willing to assume risk. He/she is a gambler who knows how to calculate the odds.

2. Knows how to get things done. More than possessing academic knowledge, such a person usually possesses an unusual amount of practical ‘street smarts.’

3. Knows how to make hard decisions. A true business leader understands he is in the business of solving problems, not running from them. Yes, he will delegate some decisions and ask for advice from others, but he also understands the buck stops with him and will go to great lengths to see the business not only survives but prospers as well. Hopefully, he understands the best business deal is when all parties involved prosper.

It’s this last element which scares the public. Whereas others agonize over making a decision, the business leader knows how to define and weigh pros and cons, calculate the best solution to benefit the enterprise, and make a decision. It is called ‘business’ and some people are simply jealous of those equipped with the faculties to take rather large and complex issues and make some rather commonsense decisions. It is not the fear of a ruthless dictator which scares people; rather, it is the envy of someone who knows how to consistently make a logical decision, not an emotional one which most people tend to embrace. Further, when a decision is made, business leaders do not necessarily sugar coat their rationale which tends to make them appear abrasive to others, thereby creating fodder for the Main Stream Media.”

So far, I was batting 1.000 in terms of describing the future president. It was his ability to tackle major decisions with commonsense solutions which disturbed the media and his political opponents. Towards the end of the article, I pondered how the country would react to a President Trump.

“One last element that disturbs some people is that business leaders tend to be capitalists, not socialists. For obvious reasons, this scares the left, including the Main Stream Media. Make no mistake, this next election is about two extremes: capitalism versus socialism. Whereas the former defends the concept of the free enterprise system and smaller government, the latter is the antithesis.”

Plain and simple, people find successful business-types as either a God-send or very abrasive. To President Trump’s supporters, he was a breath of fresh air who delivered on his promises and made considerable achievements even in the face of a resistant Congress. To his opponents, President Trump is perceived as a genuine threat to the Washington “Swamp,” which worked overtime to fight him. To illustrate, consider what President Trump faced during his first administration:

1. The rise of “Fake News.”
2. The rise of the “resistance” movement, both in the Congress and the streets.
3. The Mueller Probe which found nothing.
4. The failed impeachment of the president.
5. The “stolen” election of 2020.

This explains why Trump’s successes frightens the Swamp. What takes them years to do, President Trump can do it at Warp speed, and at less expense, thereby posing a threat to their existence.

This brings up an important point, is the nation’s capitol a good venue for business people to flourish in a presidential capacity? Unfortunately, the answer seems to be, No. As we have witnessed with President Trump, he is perceived as an uninvited outsider who challenges the authority of the status quo. As much as this may be needed, such a person must be willing to suffer the slings and arrows of a rather determined opponent. The only way such a person wins is if he/she can dominate the Congress and the press. Unfortunately, it usually works the other way around.

After re-reading my 2011 article, all I can say is, Bryce was more than right, he was spot-on!

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

 
<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: