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Archive for November, 2021

THANKSGIVING & THE LOVES OF OUR LIVES

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 23, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Celebrating the many loves in our lives.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

thanks2Thanksgiving is a favorite of mine and I have written about it on numerous occasions (see below). It’s more than just the food, it’s about being around friends and family. It’s the telling of a joke or story, a fond memory, and a glass of cheer. All of this reflects on the love we have for those who surround us, to wit –

THE LOVES OF OUR LIVES

Throughout our lives we touch a lot of people.

Before you are born, you are the twinkle in your father’s eye.

When you are born, you warm your grandmothers’ hearts.

When you are a toddler, you are the apple of your mother’s eye.

When you are in grade school, you become the buddy of your grandfathers.

You form bonds with family and friends that often lasts a lifetime.

When you play well in a game, you are celebrated by your teammates.

As you enter your clumsy teenage years, you are the scourge of your parents,

But when you graduate from school, you are their pride.

As a young adult, you finally meet the love of your life.

When you marry, your mother is delighted but your father shed’s a tear.

When you have children of your own, your friends and family rejoice.

When you succeed at work, you are the toast of your business associates.

As you retire, you surround yourself with old friends and reminisce.

And when you are gone, you reside in the recesses of our loved ones’ memories, all of whom you have touched.

Each person touches many lives, not only receiving love but passing it on to others as well.

And when we gather around the Thanksgiving table, let us give thanks for the blessings we have and the love we share.

Happy Thanksgiving.

My other columns on Thanksgiving:

* Tim’s 2017 Thanksgiving Grace (Huffington Post, 11/22/2017)

* How not to cook a Thanksgiving Dinner (11/23/2016)

* A Thanksgiving Moment (11/27/2013)

* What are we giving Thanks to? (11/20/2012)

First published: November 26, 2019

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

tim75x75Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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TIM’S FIGHT WITH CANCER, PART I

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 16, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– A personal look at what goes on during such a fight.

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tbliver1I’ve got cancer; Stage 2 liver cancer to be precise. I’ve been sitting on this piece of news for some time now and have only shared it with family and close personal friends as I didn’t want to be awash in sympathy cards and notes through social media; I still don’t want to hear it. I’m going to beat this devil, which is probably what every person diagnosed with some form of cancer says, but I think I have a good medical team in place and I am optimistic. I am therefore writing this to let people know what it is like to go through this process, what goes through a patient’s head, and hopefully help someone along the way.

Years ago, I wrote a column titled, “Cancer, the Big Kahuna” of diseases which described the various forms of the disease. Since then, I have lost a lot of friends to the many forms of it, e.g., pancreatic, lung, brain, and more. Each had a unique experience in their battle with it. I realize there is no super-cure for cancer, but we have still made considerable progress during my lifetime. As of this writing, I am in my 67th year on this planet and there is still a lot I want to do with my life, but I am now mindful I have a problem and will watch the clock carefully.

What triggered all this was a routine review of my blood by my primary care physician who informed me my platelet count was falling. According to the National Cancer Institute, “a platelet is a tiny, disc-shaped piece of cell that is found in the blood and spleen. Platelets are pieces of very large cells in the bone marrow called megakaryocytes. They help form blood clots to slow or stop bleeding and to help wounds heal. Having too many or too few platelets or having platelets that don’t work as they should can cause problems. Checking the number of platelets in the blood may help diagnose certain diseases or conditions.”

To check on this, I was turned over to a specialist who ordered a biopsy of my bone marrow as produced from my hip. As it turned out, I was producing a lot of good blood, but something was eating up the platelets. This resulted in a series of tests, including an MRI, CTscan, and another biopsy on my liver. After all this, I was called in to speak to the doctor who broke “the news” to me. He was all business and “matter-of-fact” in his demeanor, and I appreciated his brutal honesty and professionalism, even though this wasn’t the news I hoped to hear. I learned a long time ago in business of the necessity of not sugar-coating anything of a serious nature. Political correctness be damned.

As I drove home, “the news” started to sink in and I found myself in a Twilight Zone or fog, wondering how the hell I got cancer. It was a very odd feeling, particularly since I feel pretty healthy right now.

There was no real history of cancer in my family, other than my maternal grandmother who fought and lost to cervical cancer, but neither my mother or father had any trace of the disease. I was asked if I had any exposure to Hepatitis C or a dirty needle; none to my knowledge. I was also asked if I used excessive alcohol; I said “No” as I consider myself a social drinker. The only other possibility was that I had become rather heavy years ago which may have created a “fatty liver” which would lead to cirrhosis of the liver, and cancer. For those of you who remember, I threw off considerable weight some time ago. I also stopped drinking a few weeks ago after hearing “the news,” which is helping me to lose weight.

Another thing I thought about while traveling home was Mickey Mantle, the legendary New York Yankee slugger who I revered as a kid. In 1995 he succumbed to an aggressive case of liver cancer. The doctors tried to give him a donor liver to solve the problem, but this didn’t occur. This too passed through my mind. Something else, for five years I was the primary caregiver for both my wife and mother who lost their battles to COPD. I find it rather ironic that I am now the patient and not the caregiver, something I never thought would happen.

The first thing I did when I got home was to “circle the wagons.” I reviewed the results with my former primary care physician who retired a couple of years ago and lives nearby. He read through the documentation carefully and clarified a few things my doctor had mentioned to me. I also reviewed it with a friend who is a retired Oncologist. He too confirmed the findings of my Doctor. I consider myself to be fortunate to have two friends from the medical community who could coach me accordingly.

As mentioned, I notified family and friends about my condition which surprised just about everyone. I asked them to keep this quiet while I tried to sort out what to do. One was a breast cancer survivor who fought her battle just a couple of years ago, so she was particularly sympathetic with my plight. My immediate family was very supportive, but I am determined not to let this have an adverse effect on their lives.

As some of you may know, I lost my wife almost two years ago. Recently though, a lady friend has entered my life who also fought and beat breast cancer about five years ago. She has been a tower of strength to lean on and I appreciate her candor on the subject. This group represents my safety net which I think is natural for humans to create as we want as much advice as possible

One of the first tasks I performed after learning of “the news” was to have my will and related estate paperwork updated. I had not reviewed the documents since we left Cincinnati in 1985. As good as it was, it still needed some updating which a local attorney handled promptly. He also helped me prepare a Power of Attorney, and a living will. This is something I should have been more mindful of, but finally put it to bed.

Following the initial shock, I then underwent a battery of tests and visited specialists who confirmed my diagnosis and discussed various treatments. The tests revealed the tumors were localized in the liver and not spreading. I also discovered how liver cancer is treated is not quite the same as with other forms of the disease. For example, chemotherapy is not applicable in this case. A liver transplant is one option, but I was told mine should be handled differently. In addition, surgery could be used to cut out the tumors and the liver can grow back. Unfortunately, in my situation, there would be a lot to cut out and my liver would never recover. The final treatment, and the one I will be undergoing, is to go in with vascular surgery and cut the blood vessels in the liver feeding the tumors, thereby killing them. So, the lesson learned here was: keep an open mind and consider all options. My doctor friends, as mentioned earlier, agreed this was the right road for me to take.

It is unlikely the surgeon would get 100% of everything on the first pass, so I might have to undergo the same treatment a second (or third) time until it has all been eradicated.

So, how do I feel about all this prior to embarking on my therapy? At first I was a bit in shock. As I said, physically I feel fine right now which caused me to disbelieve I have a problem. Then you ask yourself, “Why me?” Once you get past this stage you start focusing on the problem with a clearer head. More than anything, I appreciate the professionalism of my medical team. This has given me a sense of confidence and optimism.

Am I scared? I suppose I should be, but I have lived a good life, have seen a lot of the world, met a lot of people, and I’m proud of my family. Instead of being scared though, I have been preparing myself mentally as if I was going into a football game much like when I was a young man. I am not so much concerned facing a formidable opponent and getting hurt, but I am now focused on beating my enemy on his home turf. I realize pain will be part of the game, but I believe I can take it. Frankly, I like my odds of winning.

One last thing I’ve noticed since my diagnosis. The next day, I went to a local family-style restaurant I frequent and ordered my meal. Across the room in a booth, an argument erupted between a husband and wife. From what I gathered, it had something to do with simply keeping the house clean. It turned rather loud and nasty with a few choice expletives thrown in for good measure. To me, it seemed blown out of proportion. I just looked on in disbelief at the rage over something rather innocuous as cleaning a house. It was then that I realized we as humans tend to worry about the wrong things.

Now on to the next stage: implementation, which will occur shortly.

Remember this: all of this was triggered by a simple and routine blood test.

Again, please no sympathy cards or notes. A little prayer wouldn’t hurt though.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

tim75x75Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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JOE BIDEN’S COAT TAILS?

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 9, 2021

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– Bad news for the Democrats as we approach the 2022 mid-terms.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

The recent election on November 2nd was a small, off-year contest. Yet, it was a major victory for Republicans and gives us a sense of what to expect in 2022 and 2024. During the election, the key Virginia positions went to the Republicans, including the governor’s mansion, and it appears the State House is reverting back to GOP control. This news is significant as Virginia was a highly contested state, one which the Democrats were determined to control. Other contests included several House seats which switched back to Republican control, and Minneapolis voters rejected the notion of replacing the police with a public safety department, something Democrats have been fighting for. However, Virginia alone has put the Democrats and their News Media into a panic mode.

All of this adds up to several things:

First, Americans are rejecting the liberal agenda of the Democrats, and prefer common sense solutions and smaller government. In Virginia, the key was school curriculum and the teaching of Critical Race Theory (CRT). This resulted in vocal school board meetings and President Biden labeling concerned parents as “Domestic Terrorists,” something that enraged the parents. Beyond this, Virginia became a referendum on the national priorities of the President and the Democrats.

The timing of the Democrats couldn’t be worse. After being elected with 81 million votes, which was touted as the most ever cast for a presidential candidate, Biden’s popularity shrunk radically in just nine short months to a 36% approval rating according to Zogby. Quinnipiac University has him at 38%, while Gallup and NBC have him at 42%, which is also low. Further, more than two-thirds of Americans believe the country is heading in the wrong direction, including half of the Democrats. Rasmussen supports this by claiming only 29% think the country is headed in the right direction. All of this is an indictment of President Biden’s policies and the liberal agenda embraced by the Democrats.

During the Virginia race, President Biden, VP Kamala Harris, and former President Obama, campaigned vigorously, all for naught. Instead of concentrating on the Virginia school problem, they opted instead to draw a parallel between former President Trump and Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin, hoping they could touch on the anger issues of the 2020 election. Interestingly, it did not, and in the end, it cost former Democrat Governor Terry McAuliffe the election.

This means President Biden has no coat tails for Democrats to ride on as we approach the critical 2022 mid-term election, which will likely put the Congress back in Republican hands. In other words, his endorsement would mean the kiss of death to Democrats running for office, and they will find themselves alone, fighting for re-election. To take it further, I cannot imagine President Biden running for re-election in 2024, and there is nobody on the horizon to replace him, certainly not Vice President Harris.

Frankly, Democrats should be unnerved by the results of the 2021 election as it foretells the future. The Democrats simply went too far, too fast in pushing their agenda. Between inflation and the economy, illegal immigration, energy, and foreign affairs, the Biden administration has not enjoyed any success by any stretch of the imagination, and Americans are pushing back in the voting booth. Consider this, GOP candidate Youngkin was at a 10 point deficit just a couple of months ago, yet he hung on, rallied the state and won handily as governor. Basically, he has carved a template for other Republicans to follow in 2022.

Yes, this is how unhappy Americans are with the Democrat agenda and President Joe Biden.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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SEND IN THE MILITARY…

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 2, 2021

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– …to fix our supply-chain problems.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

We’re hearing a lot about a massive supply chain problem whereby we do not have enough port workers and truck drivers to unload and ship materials throughout the country. Imports are radically up, and exports lag woefully behind, a telltale sign of problems with trade and the economy. Experts claim this supply chain problem will have an adverse effect on our upcoming holiday shopping season. To compensate, the Biden Administration proudly announced a deal to keep certain ports open around the clock, but the fact remains there are worker shortages.

Let’s be clear, under normal circumstances we would have enough longshoremen and truck drivers to maintain the supply chain, but these are unusual times. To illustrate, inflation is up, and as Bloomberg reports, “It now costs as much as $25,000 to import a 40-foot container from Asia, up from less than $2,000 two years ago.” The fact fuel has spiraled upwards since the beginning of the year also adds to the cost of living.

Nonetheless, we now have bottlenecks at our ports to accept imports, (with empty ships leaving with our exports), and we have an immediate need for manpower. The most obvious remedy is to use the military for both unloading ships and trucking. Some might argue this is a waste of military talent. Not really, as they have been doing such tasks for a long time. Nor is it without precedent.

I find it interesting most Americans have already forgotten President Ronald Reagan’s problem with FAA air-traffic controllers back in 1981. As a quick history lesson, this occurred just seven months into Reagan’s first term. At the time, the Professional Air-Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO) had gone on strike over wanting federal pay increases and a shorter work week. Almost immediately, this caused pandemonium in commercial flight schedules with many delays and cancellations. This brought the country to the brink of closing down air transportation.

Angered, President Reagan warned the members of PATCO to return to work or face termination. The union defiantly resisted, thereby causing Reagan to fire over 11,000 air-traffic controllers. Further, these people became ineligible to be re-hired. Now, without air-traffic controllers, the President called on the military to replace the union until new controllers could be found. It was a slow process, which affected business worldwide, but proved to be an effective means to solve the problem. Flights resumed and the country returned to normal.

This is precisely the type of action we need today. We may not have a defiant union to deal with, but we do have an immediate crunch-problem in terms of workers. If the Biden Administration is serious about fixing the problem, bringing in the military on an interim basis is a no-brainer. Think about it; what is the point of opening up our ports 24/7 if we lack the manpower to unload the ships and truck the merchandise? That is like buying a gun without any bullets; it’s totally useless.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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