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Archive for the ‘Family’ Category

FATHERS EAT HEELS

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 5, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– and perform all the thankless jobs around the house.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I was making a sandwich the other day, and as I opened a loaf of bread I observed the heel customarily unclaimed by other members of the family. I, of course, took it to build my sandwich. Only then did I stop to think how many times I had done this over the years as my family seems to have an aversion to eating the heel and, consequently, it was always earmarked for my consumption exclusively. It’s not that I relish eating the heel, I just don’t want to see it go to waste. I then started to think about the other attributes that distinguish fathers. For example:

It is the father’s job to kill spiders, bugs, and any other potential vermin frightening the household. In Florida, this includes man-eating grasshoppers, ants, armadillos, opossums, snakes, palmetto bugs (what we call cockroaches in the South), and the rare alligator that may wander by the house.

It is the father’s job to take out the trash, not just the regular kitchen garbage but virtually anything that can be shoved into, on top of, or next to a trash can. This includes items from the attic, bio-hazardous material stored in the garage, and anything that can be hacked off on the property. When the receptacles are full, it is the father’s job to somehow transport it to a dumping station, usually in the cleanest car available.

It is the father’s job to mow the lawn. More than mere mowing, this includes edging, hedging, pruning, sodding, raking, fertilizing, and blowing debris off the property. Hopefully the father is assisted by his offspring, but most find it an imposition for the child and therefore pays for Mexican laborers to perform the task instead.

It is the father’s job to change the oil and wash the car. I don’t mean running down to a car wash or quick-lube either. Every father should know how to use a hose and bucket of suds, not to mention wax. Further, they should be able to change the oil, miss the pan, and cleanup the slop spilled on the driveway. Hopefully the father is assisted by his offspring, but most find it an imposition for the child and therefore pays for Mexican laborers to perform the task instead.

It is the father’s job to eat leftovers and anything else the family refuses to consume. This distorts his palate which explains why fathers have a passion for such things as lima beans, Brussels sprouts, artichoke hearts, rutabaga, lamb shanks, liver and onions, black eyed peas and collard greens, grits, tapioca pudding, Rhubarb Pie, and Bosco.

It is the father’s job to help the children with their homework when they hit a problem. It is also his job to look as helplessly puzzled when he doesn’t know the answer (or understand the question).

It is the father’s job to make simple house repairs, such as changing the garbage disposal, fixing the toilet, repairing the door bell, or electrocuting himself when he should have called an electrician.

It is the father’s job to be the computer technician of the house, to hook up wires and strings, to buy and replace printer cartridges, and to curse Microsoft.

It is the father’s job to take the blame for whatever goes wrong, large or small, regardless if he is at fault or not, pick up the pieces and try to mend things.

It’s not easy being a father. We get all the dirty little jobs to do, and the leftovers to eat. We only ask for a little love and attention in return.

Just remember, fathers eat heels.

Originally published: December 16, 2010

Also published with News Talk Florida.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  MOVING UP TOO FAST – What happens when you do not pay your dues.

LAST TIME:  FINDING THE TIME AS MANAGER  – Embrace your workers, do not avoid them.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific); and WWBA-AM (News Talk Florida 820). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

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Posted in Family, Life | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

WHEN DO WE BECOME OUR PARENTS?

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 4, 2015

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Is it in our 20’s, 30’s, or 40’s?

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Perhaps the most common joke at a high school reunion is when someone inevitably makes the observation, “Gee, when did we become our parents?” To me, the answer is simple: at age 40. Actually, a lot depends on when we were born as well as our offspring, but it is fair to say the transformation begins in our early 40’s. In our twenties, most of us are still learning to spread our wings and begin our careers. Lust typically raises its ugly head during this period, and along comes children. At this stage, I don’t think we’re our parents quite yet as we are still learning to find our way through the world and how to cope with the ankle-biters around us.

As the kids get older and enter grade school, we’re now in our thirties. At this stage we are still relatively active and fit. We are also coming into our own professionally. Both husband and wife remain active, be it developing a career or helping with the kids’ homework. Retirement is still a nebulous concept to us. No, we’re still not there yet.

As we enter our 40’s though, we start to observe several subtle changes around us. For example, we start to attend more weddings, showers and funerals. Oh God, the funerals. Long time friends and family members suddenly and mysteriously begin to pass away and we become conscious of our own mortality. We also start to observe and celebrate silver and golden anniversaries, not just our own, but of friends and relatives.

You notice that your parents are slowing down, their hair is getting whiter, and they are beginning to have trouble with their teeth and hearing, not to mention walking. In contrast, your children are now teenagers and abuzz with activity and chatter as they are discovering the world around them. Not surprising, it’s around this time when you become acutely aware of rising insurance bills and you start thinking about pending college tuitions, weddings and other substantial bills in the not too distant future. And this is where I believe we truly become our parents; as we find ourselves stuck between generations. It is this period when we come to the realization we share the same worries and concerns our parents experienced and we are shocked by the epiphany that we are no different than they were. We have the same interests, the same humor, the same type of friends and social activities. It is something we all must experience sooner or later.

I don’t wish to demean parenting in our 20’s or 30’s, but we really do not grasp the significance of it until we reach our 40’s. I see everything prior to it as nothing more than a learner’s permit, but it is our 40’s that defines us as parents and how we’ll be remembered as such. It is typically at this time when we go back for a high school reunion, look around at our old friends and notice they look and act remarkably like how we remembered our parents and their friends. It is then that you know with certainty that you have indeed become your parents. Don’t dismay though, consider it a right of passage. We all go through it.

Originally published: November 10, 2010

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  PEARL HARBOR DAY – Remembering the day of “Infamy.”

LAST TIME:  ONE WEEK’S MADNESS  – What in the world is going on?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Family, Life | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

DIFFERENCES IN FAMILY VALUES

Posted by Tim Bryce on June 3, 2015

BRYCE ON SOCIETY

– What is the true cause of our changing world and what can be done about it?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

In lieu of the riots in Baltimore, I thought I would talk about the importance of family values. Like millions of people, I watched in horror at the “protestors” on television. Perhaps a better name is “rioters” or “thugs” (regardless if it is politically correct or not, it is an apt description). The brightest spot though, was Toya Graham, the Baltimore mom slapping her son during the riots. It was refreshing to see a parent take charge of their offspring and straighten him out.

This incident says a lot about family values and discipline of our youth. This caused me to think about how parents raise their children today:

* If you were taught by your parents education was important, you will embrace it and take it seriously and improve yourself. If not, you are likely to drop out and grouse about others getting better paying jobs than you do.

* If you were taught by your parents the merits of work, you will become industrious. If not, you will probably become shiftless and undependable. Crime, drugs, and prison are likely in your future.

* If you were taught by your parents the meaning of responsibility, you will become dependable and a good citizen. If not, you will likely blame others for your problems and spend your life taking handouts and develop a dependency on welfare.

* If you were taught respect, manners and common courtesy by your parents, you will be considered socially well adjusted and experience prosperity through personal connections. If not, your social connections will likely be gangs, thugs, and criminals.

* If you were taught ethics by your parents, you will likely attend a place of worship and treat people fairly. If not, you will probably suffer from low self-esteem and treat people brutally.

* If you were taught right versus wrong by your parents, you will make better decisions. If not, you’ll make the wrong ones.

* If you were taught American history and the responsibilities of citizenship by your parents, you will likely become a patriot. If not, you will likely try to subvert the country.

It’s all about parenting. This, of course, means two things; first, parents are the prime source for personal guidance and social adjustment, and; second, they are role models for their offspring, good or bad. If they fail in either area, the child will likely take notice and learn their values from others, such as thugs and television. Children also have a tendency to emulate their parents. If they are misfits, the child will likewise become one. If they are industrious and responsible, the children are likely to assume these values.

Finally, if you were taught to be thankful for the little pleasures and bounties of life, regardless of how sparce they may be, you will lead a decent life.

Frankly, I think the poem “If” by Rudyard Kipling should be mandatory reading in every household.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  SLOWING DOWN? – Are we working harder or smarter?

LAST TIME:  BED BUGS & OUR CHANGING WORLD  – What is the true cause of our changing world and what can be done about it?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Family, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 5 Comments »

WHAT ARE WE GIVING THANKS TO?

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 26, 2014

BRYCE ON THANKSGIVING

– What kind of grace do you give at turkey time?

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

One of the reasons I enjoy Thanksgiving is because it is one of the few holidays where we do not have to exchange gifts. We simply get together with family and friends and enjoy the company. Maybe we’ll watch a parade on television or perhaps some football, but it’s the communal experience which I enjoy the most. For some reason, the preparation of the meal is less of a chore and more of a pleasure, probably because we realize it is designed for many people on a special day.

We’re all familiar with the origins of Thanksgiving, that the Pilgrims at Plymouth were thankful to celebrate the harvest at the end of the season. Actually, Thanksgiving traces its roots back to the 1500’s in England. It’s an old custom, and a good one as we would be remiss if we didn’t periodically take time to be thankful for the blessings we have received, be they few or many.

As a child, I was thankful simply to have the clan assemble, which was a rarity as the family was spread out across the country. We would have the meal at my grandmother’s house in Buffalo, New York, and I can distinctly remember the aromatic smells emanating from the kitchen which seemed heavenly. I would get the opportunity to talk with my grandparents, great-grandparents, and aunts and uncles. Everyone was in good spirits and helped as required. Occasionally, a squabble would erupt between family members over some innocuous subject which was quickly quelled and forgotten. If my great-grandfather was in high spirits, he would bring out his fiddle and play a tune from a distant era, much to everyone’s approval. It was interesting to watch the family dynamics, even at an early age. From time to time, I would sneak into the kitchen to check on progress and steal a nibble of something before getting caught. The room was awash in activity; relish trays being garnished with radishes, green onions, celery, and olives; salads being prepared along with appetizer trays consisting of a variety of dips and delicacies; in addition to the turkey and stuffing, there were mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, pearl onions, beets, cranberries, crescent rolls, and at least three different pies for dessert. As a kid, the room was a magical tapestry of smells and delights. It still seems this way to me many years later.

As I got older and moved up the family hierarchy, I learned to assume more responsibility in the preparation of the meal, such as dressing the bird and carving the meat. When we were finally called to the table, we all knew this was a special meal for a special occasion. To me, the Thanksgiving dinner is not complete without grace. As a child, it was always considered an honor to be selected to say the grace before the meal, which should be done with tact and presentation. A lot of kids tend to avoid the limelight of saying grace, but we considered it an essential part of the meal, hence an honor to deliver it on such an auspicious occasion.

As an adult, when I am asked to give the grace, I try to convey the fundamental things that truly affect us, such as:

* That we are thankful of all of the blessings we have, large or small; that we have a roof over our head in these perilous economic times; that we are in good health and remember those who are not.

* That we are thankful to live in a great country, even though we are cognizant it is certainly not perfect. We are thankful for the freedoms we enjoy as defined by the U.S. Constitution.

* That we are thankful for the people who protect and defend our nation; we pray they be protected from harms way.

* That we are thankful that we are all together for this bountiful meal, and to remember those who preceded us as well as those yet to come.

I think the Thanksgiving Prayer written by Samuel F. Pugh covers several of my concerns:

O God, when I have food,
help me to remember the hungry;
When I have work,
help me to remember the jobless;
When I have a home,
help me to remember those who have no home at all;
When I am without pain,
help me to remember those who suffer,
And remembering,
help me to destroy my complacency;
bestir my compassion,
and be concerned enough to help;
By word and deed,
those who cry out for what we take for granted.
Amen.

Then again, as a Scotsman, I may turn to “The Selkirk Grace”:

Some hae meat and canna eat,
And some wad eat that want it;
But we hae meat, and we can eat,
And sae let the Lord be thankit.

Just don’t expect me to pipe in a turkey stuffed with haggis.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Originally published: November 20, 2012

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  THE FACTS OF LIFE REGARDING MANAGEMENT – One of four new books from Tim; this book provides lessons well suited for those aspiring to become effective managers.

LAST TIME:  DOG POOP  – What do your dogs think about all of this?

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; The Glenn Pav Show on WTAN-AM (1340) in Clearwater, FL, Mon-Fri (9-10am); and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Family | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

PARANOID PARENTING

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 14, 2014

BRYCE ON PARENTING

– Who’s in charge? The parent or the child?

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

My grandmother used to be fond of saying, “Most children are raised by amateurs, not professionals,” and I think she really hit the nail on the head with this one. Regardless of how much you read or the classes you attend, nothing really prepares you properly for parenthood. Only by experiencing it and looking back afterwards do you appreciate what is needed to be an effective mother and father, but then again, it’s too late.

Whether or not you’re paying attention to them, children will grow like weeds, and if you’re not actively involved with their development, I can assure you someone else will be, and probably not for the better. For example, if children do not pick up their manners and other socialization skills from their parents, they will inevitably learn it from classmates, neighbors, and the media. In terms of the latter, I’m not so much concerned what they are watching on “Sesame Street” as I am in terms of what they are watching on MTV and late night television.

What concerns me though is when children are left in charge of their own development. This happens when parents have either abdicated their parental duties due to other priorities or operate in fear of their offspring. That’s right, fear. Due to our litigious society some parents are actually afraid of disciplining their children as they might be accused of child abuse. Precocious children who have been paying attention to television and the Internet understand this and have actually turned the tables on some parents by threatening to falsely accuse their parents of inappropriate conduct. This makes the parents paranoid in terms of how to discipline their children thereby compounding the problem further. In other words, parents walk on eggshells in dealing with their own children. Instead of the child being subordinate to the parent, the parent becomes subservient to the child.

Although it is sad to see such a relationship emerge, parents have themselves to blame, simply because they maintained a “hand-off” approach to parenting in the earliest stages of the child’s development. So what can be done? It depends on the parents and the resources available to them. Corporal punishment might be suitable based on the old philosophy of “Spare the rod and spoil the child,” but perhaps not as a regular regimen. It might be preferable instead to seek professional help which would include counseling and possibly medication. Even better, try turning the TV off and unplugging the Internet, give them some chores and responsibilities to perform, put them on a timetable, follow-up, and don’t let them off the hook. Don’t worry about being their best friend, instead worry about being a good parent. In other words, it is your responsibility to engage them.

Originally published: 11/11/2008

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  REACTIVE MANAGEMENT – Why it is easier to be more reactive than proactive.

LAST TIME:  MEDICINAL MARIJUANA AS A TROJAN HORSE  – What is the real reason for legalizing marijuana? To relieve the pain of patients? Hardly.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific), and KGAB-AM (650) of Cheyenne, Wyoming. Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Family, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

PERSONAL PECCADILLOES

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 14, 2013

BRYCE ON FAMILY & TRAVEL

– Why we behave the way we do under close quarters.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Holidays such as Thanksgiving and Christmas typically bring members of the family together, as does family vacations and anniversaries. Inevitably, family members open their homes and share quarters with loved ones traveling from out of town. Perhaps you’ll go home to see your parents and stay in your old room or stay with one of your siblings. Such close quarters are certainly appreciated, but they also have a tendency to drive people crazy, both the host and the guest, regardless how much we love our family.

As creatures of habit, we all have our own unique set of nuances we like to live by, particularly at home. Such habits may seem insignificant, but we begin to feel inhibited when we try to live in close quarters with someone else. In other words, we have to be on our best behavior and cannot truly relax as we normally would. To illustrate:

* Meal time can be awkward as people have different eating customs. For example, some people will eat a hearty breakfast, others something simple, and some not at all. Some like coffee, others want tea or just some juice of some kind. It all makes for some awkward moments for people in the kitchen. Some people like to eat strange snacks and consume beverages during off hours. What is normal to one person appears strange to others. The time at which we eat can also become an issue, as well as the types of food and restaurants we like. Trying to plan an evening dinner to accommodate everyone’s tastes and timetables can become as complicated as planning D-Day.

* In terms of bathroom decorum we have to observe different customs of using the shower, the “facilities,” towels and trash, and general cleanliness. Some people are slobs, others are neat freaks, neither of which are compatible.

* Even the act of washing clothes can become awkward. Some people like to wash small loads, others large. Then there is the matter of the water temperature and the amount of detergent to use. I realize it sounds rather petty, but such nuances drive some people crazy.

* Then there is the matter of what clothes to wear for certain occasions. Regardless of how old you are, your mother will inevitably comment, “You’re not going out dressed like that are you?” Even the comfortable clothes you want to wear around the house comes under scrutiny.

* Maintaining the bedroom can also become a problem. Some people like to live in pigpens, others are more tidy. Believe me, the differences between hosts and guests are considerable. Some hosts insist on sacrificing their own bedrooms to allow their guests maximum comfort. Inevitably, guests cannot relax in fear they may do something wrong in the inner sanctum, and hosts toss and turn uncomfortably on sleep sofas with metal bars sticking in their spines. It’s a no-win scenario no matter what you do.

* There are many other idiosyncrasies observed, such as talking too much or too little or at the wrong time, smoking, imbibing a drink, eating too much or too little, what you eat versus what you don’t, how you exercise (or not), how the coffee is made, what vitamins and medication you are taking, what you watch on television, what time you rise in the morning and retire at night, even how you drive your own car.

We all have unique peculiarities we like to live by and when we get together with family members we try to bite our tongues for the sake of harmony. However, I’ve observed some people are more accommodating than others. If you are the guest, you have to respect the wishes of your hosts, and; if you are the hosts, you have to tolerate the nuances of your guests. Compromise is the order of the day in such situations. You do not want to become an intruding pest regardless of the role you are playing.

In the end, we are all greatly relieved when the family disperses and everyone returns home. Guests are delighted to return to the routine of their own domain, and hosts are relieved to see their households return to normal.

We don’t really want to become pests to other people, but because of our peculiarities we cannot help it. Perhaps the worst thing though is to overstay your welcome and get under the skin of your family. If you are going to be in close quarters for an extended period of time, let me suggest you do it on neutral ground, such as in a hotel in another city, or on a cruise ship, where someone else will be charged with looking after your foibles. Otherwise, it is not uncommon for family members to start bickering among themselves, gossiping, and animosity inevitably grows into rage. This is why we should avoid “family” restaurants; there’s a fight at every table. Such is the price of our personal peccadilloes.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  MORE GOBBLEDYGOOK – I hear America talking.

LAST TIME:  BOXES OF RULES – Too many leads to a bureaucratic nightmare.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Lance Tormey & Brian Teegarden (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Family, Social Issues, Travel | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

IN PRAISE OF SISTERS

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 13, 2013

BRYCE ON BROTHER/SISTER RELATIONSHIPS

– The unique relationship between a brother and a sister.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Coming from a male dominated family, I missed out on having a sister. I always found the discourse of men and women to be rather interesting. They are entirely different. Men like to get to the point in their discussions, they enjoy a good joke, and like to BS about trivialities like sports and business. I find the banter of women to also be interesting yet substantially different than men. I think most like to size each other up and talk about family and events within their circle. Nonetheless, I find the talk between men and women to be substantially different than when they are amongst their own gender. They are either cordial, flirtatious, or candidly talk on the square, such as that between a brother and a sister. I have a son and daughter and have always admired their relationship as they tell each other things they wouldn’t normally tell their best friends or parents.

Although I never had an actual sister, I have been very fortunate to have three people I regard as sisters. Interestingly, two of them are named “Nancy,” one was a next-door neighbor I grew up with as a kid, and the other is someone I coached softball with years ago. The other is a sister-in-law whom I have known since High School. All three are down-to-earth people who I have enjoyed many a laugh and disagreement with over the years. More importantly, we have developed a rapport whereby we can talk candidly with each other. I respect their opinions and have often sought their advice on a variety of issues. We don’t see each other often, but when we talk, we simply pick up where we left off.

Although I enjoy their company and we have had our share of good times together, I think I appreciate their candor most of all. If I get off-track on something, they reel me in by speaking heart-to-heart with me. Their honesty is refreshing and something you don’t always hear among men. I suspect the same is true among women. We’ve discussed everything from raising families to our professional interests.

The discussions among husbands and wives is substantially different than between brothers and sisters. Whereas husbands and wives are trying to work together to make ends meet, brothers and sisters are more inclined to look at things from another perspective. My wife has a brother and I have observed how she talks to him is different than how she talks to her sisters. They laugh a lot, but they have also gone toe-to-toe on some issues. Regardless, they are blood and work out any differences that may surface.

Brother/Sister relationships are interesting. Although they are generally positive, there are instances where a feud can erupt, but this is not as common as Brother/Brother or Sister/Sister feuds. I think the difference of gender is the leveling factor.

For men, having a sister you can trust is very comforting. I hope women feel the same way. I just wish we had a Brother/Sister Day to remind us of how we value each other. We have holidays for just about everything else, but few are as important as the relationship between a brother and a sister.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  WHAT THE HECK ARE THEY TEACHING? – Politics in the classroom.

LAST TIME:  THE MORALITY PLEDGE – “And if I stumble, grant me the courage to ask for help.”

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Family, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

FOR MOTHER’S DAY

Posted by Tim Bryce on May 11, 2013

BRYCE ON MOTHERS DAY

– 12 things I’ve learned about mothers.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

* Mother’s spit has cured scratches, bruises and fixed millions of projects.

* Mothers sleep with their eyes half-open (they never stop worrying).

* Mothers dispense vitamin pills daily for their offspring, even when they’ve grown into adults.

* Mothers are always the last to sit down at the dinner table.

* The best ingredient in a meal prepared by a mother is her heart.

* Mothers always warn, “Be careful or you’ll put your eye out.”

* Mothers know where you hide things.

* Mothers keep your school work and anything you made for them when you were a child.

* Mothers know if you have been naughty or nice, not Santa.

* Mothers usually accept less so their children can have more.

* Mothers may not agree with you, but they will always listen.

* No matter how old you are, mothers smile at you as you leave home, but weep after you have left.

Have I forgotten anything?

Happy Mothers Day!

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Family, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

PARENTAL VISIONS OF GRANDEUR

Posted by Tim Bryce on January 18, 2013

BRYCE ON PARENTING

– Just who are you trying to impress anyway? Certainly not me.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Naturally, we all love our children, but it has always bothered me how parents want to impress you with how much better their kids are than your own. I remember years ago hearing a friend brag to me, “Well, our little girl has been accepted into Montessori school.” I would counter by saying, “Gee, I didn’t know she was having a problem.” I don’t think he saw the humor in this.

Back when I was coaching Little League, I ran into many parents who saw their kid as the next Babe Ruth and made sure I knew about it. One by one, they all eventually dropped out of baseball in favor of pursuing other interests or simply because they knew they couldn’t excel in it any longer. This was fine with me as it meant I didn’t have to listen to the parents’ malarkey anymore.

I find it interesting how parents try to live vicariously through their offspring. I guess they feel they blew it in life and are now getting a second chance through their children. This puts a lot of pressure on the kids to satisfy their parents and not enjoy the moment. Kids have a tough enough time with school and learning how to socialize; the last thing they need is an overbearing parent pushing them too hard. Yes, we want parents to be an active part of their children’s lives, but they shouldn’t try to live their lives through them. Sometimes, kids just need to be kids. In Little League, as well as youth soccer and football, it’s now quite common to have parents sign a code of conduct requiring them not to be obnoxious at sporting events. I never dreamt we would ever need such a contract, but with some parents trying to live through their kids, I guess I’m really not surprised.

I’m now a little older and have seen the children grow into adulthood. I find it amusing that the kids who were touted as geniuses by their parents are now working at convenience marts, and the star athletes now work on fishing boats. I guess they either peaked too early or their parents burned them out.

Those parents suffering from visions of grandeur need a reality check. There is certainly nothing wrong with a kid who shows signs of intelligence or possesses a talent, but there is a difference between nurturing their abilities and pushing them too hard. I guess some parents need to be reminded whose life it is, their children’s or their own? Whichever it is, please keep it to yourself as nobody else really cares.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.


NEXT UP: 
OFFICE TEMPERATURE – Who controls the thermostat in your office?


Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, (12:30-3:00pm).

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Family, Life | Tagged: , , , , | 5 Comments »

THE WISDOM OF DOBIE GILLIS

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 16, 2012

BRYCE ON LIFE

– A subtle yet simple suggestion for improving life.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

As a kid, a favorite television show of mine was “The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis” which aired on CBS from 1959 to 1963. It also appeared in syndication many years afterwards. I’m not sure many adults followed it at the time, but the kids became addicted to it as it was one of the few shows examining the trials and tribulations of a teenager transitioning into adulthood. Dobie (played by Dwayne Hickman) would usually open the show next to a statue of Rodin’s “The Thinker” where he would give a monologue to the television audience pondering a specific aspect of life. Although it was intended to be a comedy, Dobie questioned such things as family relationships, attracting the opposite sex, money, education, ethics; questions we all ask ourselves particularly at a young age. Even though it was done with humor, there was usually a profound message to each episode, at least to Dobie, which is why youth gravitated to the show. As an aside, I particularly enjoyed Dobie’s father, Herbert T. Gillis (played by Frank Faylen), a cantankerous, hard-working WW2 vet who owned a local grocery store. We could all relate to the family dynamics in the Gillis household.

Not long ago, I was pleased to discover the show was played on an “oldies” cable channel but in the wee hours of the morning. Fortunately, I was able to DVR it, and watch it at my leisure. There was one episode which I found particularly interesting, “Names My Mother Called Me,” where Dobie is invited to meet a Nobel Prize-winning scientist who inspired his unusual first name, Dr. D.W. Klein, whose character was based on Albert Einstein, the great physicist. Today’s generation would compare him to British physicist Stephen Hawking.

In this particular episode, Dr. Klein wants to retire and pursue other interests. As Dr. Klein has greatly influenced how people think and view the world around them, the press is hounding him for one final statement regarding the meaning of life. A press conference is arranged, but prior to attending it, Dr. Klein calls for a meeting with Dobie Gillis (of all people), who is surprised by the invitation. As it turns out, Dobie’s mother (played by Florida Friebus) knew Dr. Klein many years ago and asked his permission to use his first name. Dr. Klein was flattered by the request and, consequently, quietly watched Dobie grow up from afar. This, of course, surprises Dobie, but he wonders how he can help the doctor:

KLEIN: “I spent a lifetime trying to make the world a better place to live in, but what is the world except the people who live in it? And what are the people who live in it except a lot of individuals, like you.”

DOBIE: “Dr. Klein, you’ve done a wonderful job of making the world a better place to live.”

KLEIN: “Is it much of a place to live in right now?”

DOBIE: “Well…”

KLEIN: “The truth.”

DOBIE: “It’s miserable.”

KLEIN: “You bet it is, and part of the reason is that people like me who try to improve life have been too busy to live it and learn what it’s all about.”

KLEIN: “Dobie, at the age when you were dancing with Thalia Menninger (Tuesday Weld), I was locked in a laboratory working out a theory that only a few eggheads like me even cared about. While I was standing by observing, you were living, you were part of life, I was outside it. Now tell me, which of us is in a better position to give advice on what the world needs?”

DOBIE: “Me? Oh, no…”

KLEIN: “You, yes, that’s why I’m going back to fundamentals, to the basic primitive things. I’ve got to try to learn the things you already know. And that’s the advice I want from you Dobie: What does the world really want from life?”

DOBIE: “Oh, come on Dr. Klein, what does a kid like me know about that?”

KLEIN: “Plenty, because you lived life. Now speak up Dobie, don’t be a prima donna.”

DOBIE: “Well, I guess I want what everybody wants, happiness.”

KLEIN: “What is happiness?”

DOBIE: “Honestly, Dr. Klein…”

KLEIN: “Don’t poke along Dobie, get to the point.”

DOBIE: “Well, one part of happiness is having a girl.”

KLEIN: “A girl? Well, a girl, of course.”

DOBIE: “And friends, people you care about, people who care about you.”

KLEIN: “Yes, that we know.”

DOBIE: “Well, everybody wants a chance for an education, so they can learn how to make a living, and they want some time to enjoy themselves after they’re through working so they can make that living mean something. And, of course, they want peace, or else none of the rest of it means anything.”

KLEIN: “Peace? Well we’ve all tried; how would you go about achieving that Dobie?”

DOBIE: “Well, for openers, I’d try to make people more polite.”

KLEIN: “Well, I’m all for that, but how do you think politeness would bring about peace?”

DOBIE: “Oh, sure it would! Well, I don’t mean polite only on the surface like taking your hat off on elevators or using the right fork. I mean polite inside, in your heart, an honest respect for the other guy’s feelings and opinions, even if you don’t agree with him.”

KLEIN: “Ah-ha, that doesn’t seem like too much to ask, yet it’s everything isn’t it?”

DOBIE: “They need one more thing, one more thing, time to dream about better days, about a fine new world.”

KLEIN: “That’s a heck of a fine dream.”

DOBIE: “It’s a heck of a necessary dream, because, well, we’ve got to dream before we can plan.”

KLEIN: “Indeed, you do. Dobie, those people out there, they’re waiting for some final word from me, some memorable message.”

DOBIE: “They sure are. They made me promise to get it to them.”

KLEIN: “So you will.”

DOBIE: “Yes sir. I’ll get a pencil and write it down.”

KLEIN: “No Dobie, you’re going to give them the message, your own message.”

DOBIE: “Me? Oh no, come on now Doctor…”

KLEIN: “You, of course; Dobie, you’re the hope of the world, you and millions of others like you. Young enough to dream, young enough to make those dreams come true. Now go Dobie, give them the message they’re waiting for. I’m going to sneak out the back door; crowds bug me.”

DOBIE: “But I can’t speak for you.”

KLEIN: “Says who? What they want from me, I can no longer give them. You can; you can give them hope. Now go on son. And son, speak up, now don’t mumble, I’m counting on you.”
As implausible a scenario as this episode represents, that a scientific genius would seek the advice of a young adult, it does offer a simple yet profound message, that the world would be a better place if we just treated ourselves with a little love and respect. It may sound corny, but there is nothing wrong with what Dobie is proposing. If you read the dialog closely, you discover the characters considered the world a mess, as well as their socialization skills and discourse at the time, something we have all been feeling lately. I was pleasantly surprised by the show’s message and was startled by the parallel between now and back then (51 years ago).

A little politeness, eh? I’m not sure that will play any better in the 21st century than it did in the 20th. I can only hope.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2012 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

 

NEXT UP:  THE VILIFICATION OF THE TEA PARTY – How and why the term “Teabagger” is used.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, (12:30-3:00pm).

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Family, Life, Social Issues, Society | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »