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Archive for the ‘Life’ Category

GOODBYE SEARS, FAREWELL OLD FRIEND

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 25, 2018

BRYCE ON LIFE

– We’re going to miss you.

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No doubt you have heard about Sears recently filing for bankruptcy. The one-time retail giant has been facing crippling losses over the last few years which caused vendors to stop shipping supplies to their stores. It now owes billions of dollars which will likely not be paid back.

At one time there were over 4,000 Sears stores throughout North America. That number has dwindled to less than 700 with liquidation sales to begin shortly.

Sears originally started out as a mail order house, then expanded to stores both in urban and suburban areas, but they eventually felt the competition of discount retailers and specialty stores, such as Walmart and Home Depot, and their market share fell. The knockout punch was the Internet, an area they entered too late allowing others to dominate the market.

To me, it seemed like Sears was with us forever. No matter where I lived, there was always a Sears store nearby. It was dependable, consistent, and good value. It was also clean and meticulously organized, making it easy to find whatever you were looking for. If you couldn’t find it, the clerks would be glad to direct you to it and answer any question you might have. As such, the store was like an old, reliable uncle or friend in the neighborhood. You were comfortable in it and, unlike other stores with unthinking clerks, you liked to visit if, for no other reason, than to browse the aisles. This is why I consider this news about the company closing as a sad sign of our changing culture.

As a kid, my brother and I would love to page through the Sears catalog as we approached Christmas time, oohing and ah-hing at the latest toys, and dogear the pages we wanted our parents to see.

Sears was the home of Kenmore appliances, Craftsman tools, and DieHard batteries, products you always had confidence in. A Craftsman tool case was perhaps the most coveted prize to have in your garage. My family bought many a lawn mower at Sears over the years, and had them serviced there as well. Their hallmark was fast, reliable, and dependable service.

The Sears auto repair centers also had a good reputation for reliable work at reasonable prices. If the service man said you needed a new belt on your engine, you knew it wasn’t a con job. Nearby was their key center where you could have a duplicate key made quickly. As a lad, I loved watching the people make keys.

Having lived in Chicago, we were all familiar with the Sears Tower which, at the time was the tallest building in the world. It was a dramatic symbol of stability and strength for the company. Chicagoans would later be shocked when it was sold and renamed the Willis Tower, but even today, natives still refer to it by its original name.

This is why the passing of Sears is so troubling and unimaginable to a lot of us. It was a beloved institution which was trusted, possessed a great reputation and was a pleasure to frequent. We were so confident in its durability that it causes us to reflect on our own frailties. Maybe the problem was they simply overextended themselves and no longer could compete with the discount houses anymore. I find it rather ironic that Sears, which was originally devised as a mail order house, fell prey to the 21st century version of the same; you know, the Internet.

And so we turn another page in our culture.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2018 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

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MORE POLITICAL CORRECTNESS RUN AMOK

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 23, 2018

BRYCE ON POLITICAL CORRECTNESS

– We need to study all of our history, not just selected chapters.

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At a recent rally in Lebanon, Ohio (10/12/2018), President Trump happened to bring up the names of the two most famous generals of the Civil War, Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee, describing them both as “great.” Liberals accepted Grant’s name as he was the Union general, but were outraged for recognizing Lee as the commander of the Army of Northern Virginia.

Here we have another example of political correctness running amok in this country. Even NBC misquoted the President and was forced to apologize later, but the damage had been done. Liberals were incensed the President would recognize Lee at all, someone they bitterly viewed as a racist.

As I grew up in the north, I was taught the North had their generals, and the South had theirs. The emphasis was on their military tactics and strategies, not their politics. The Union won, the Confederacy lost, and a lot of people died in the process. We recognized the North had generals they were proud of, as did the South, and it basically ended there.

Now, in the 21st century, we are being taught by the Left to never discuss anyone in the Confederate States of America (CSA), as they were all allegedly racist. This is simply foolish as the War between the States, is an epochal event in the development of our country and there are many lessons to be learned. However, liberals would rather have us ignore it as the old racist attitudes of the South are too offensive by today’s standards. I’m sorry, but burying your head in the sand is just plain foolish.

I would remind my liberal friends of a few simple facts about General Lee.

* When war broke out, President Lincoln offered Lee the command of northern forces. However, he turned it down as he couldn’t go against his beloved Virginia.

* Lee had served as Superintendent of the Military Academy at West Point, where many of the cadets were trained and would later serve both the North and the South.

* Lee knew Grant through the Mexican-American War, when Lee was Major and Grant a Lieutenant. At the Appomattox surrender, the two chatted briefly of their days in that war.

* Arlington National Cemetery was Lee’s home prior to the war. Following heavy losses after the Battle of the Wilderness, the U.S. Army Quartermaster commandeered Lee’s home and buried the Union dead there.

* After the Civil War, Lee became the president of Washington College in Lexington, Virginia where he ably served for five years before passing away. To honor him, the college was renamed “Washington and Lee University” and this name carries forward to today.

Regardless of his position on slavery, militarily, historians agree he was a great general, having defeated Union forces many times, particularly in the early part of the war. He surrendered after his losses in the North, Union victories in the South, and the depletion of supplies, making victory untenable.

One little bit of trivia most liberals are unaware of is their beloved U.S. Grant, who went on to switch parties and become a Republican and 18th President of the United States, was a slave owner prior to the start of the war (while he was still a Democrat).

History isn’t always pretty. In fact, it can be quite ugly, but we should study it nonetheless to learn its lessons and avoid making the same mistakes a second time. Instead, Liberals believe this ugly chapter of our history should be removed from the history books completely. This is censorship at its worse.

The Civil War was what it was. We cannot change it by political correctness or deleting chapters. We must look at it in its entirety, warts and all.

I’m just disappointed we have to keep fighting the Civil War over and over again.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2018 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

DON’T YOU FEEL BETTER?

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 19, 2018

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Stop asking. It’s annoying.

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Some of you will remember a few years ago, I started to clean up my act. This usually happens in your sixties as you start to notice your friends beginning to pass away. I’ve been on this trip for at least three years now. Inevitably, people ask me how I feel. Well, I’ll tell you…

CIGARS

I stopped smoking cigars three years ago as I found I wasn’t really enjoying them anymore. It was an expensive habit which caused me to think about my health. People gave me a lot of “atta boy” compliments at the time as they admired my fortitude to quit. Recently though, somebody asked me if I felt better for staying off cigars for so long. Frankly, No, I didn’t feel any better or worse for it. Shortly thereafter I quietly had a smoke with a friend and felt no different afterwards. I do not smoke as regularly as before, but I will sneak one now and then.

EXERCISE

I’ve been going to the gym regularly now for two years as part of my effort to reduce weight and improve myself physically. I’m still fairly strong but when I’m asked afterwards if I feel better for exercising, I most emphatically answer, “No.” True, my muscle tone is better but I still feel the wear and tear of osteoarthritis, so I certainly do not come out of the gym dancing.

ALCOHOL

I knocked my sugar levels down by cutting fruit juices and soft drinks out of my diet, but I also gave up alcohol in the process. This is perhaps the biggest reason for my loss of weight. I imbibed in a glass of Scotch whiskey now and then as there is no sugar in it, but I certainly missed a quiet beer at the end of the day. Again, I’ve been asked, “Don’t you feel better?” No, not really. My sugar numbers are excellent now, so once in awhile I’ll treat myself to an ice cold Lite beer. I had forgotten how good it tasted.

FOOD

Based on my doctor’s advice, I learned to avoid bread, pasta and sweets. It didn’t bother me to drop the pasta and sweets, but I missed the bread. I haven’t had a Publix sub in probably two years, and I eat mostly protein. I still stick to this regimen, but do I feel any better? Of course not.

WEIGHT

Between the exercise, change in diet and less alcohol, I dropped a significant amount of weight. Do I feel any better from losing the weight? Yes, but I sure do miss the Publix subs. The only problem I encountered along the way was my relatives who started to say I looked too skinny and sickly. You have to remember, these are the same people who encouraged me to lose the weight in the beginning. The lesson here is simple, you cannot win, no matter what you do.

Net, net, net, do I really feel better? Not really. I could keep on knocking myself out concentrating on my health, but I would probably miss the little things in life that make it enjoyable, such as an occasional cigar, a cold libation, and something decent to eat. I guess it is all a matter of moderation.

Now stop asking.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2018 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Healthcare, Life | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

FINDING JESUS

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 2, 2018

BRYCE ON LIFE

– He’ll be back after these words…

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I recently had a friend confide in me that he had found Jesus. Frankly, I didn’t know he was missing. Religion is always a touchy subject, but in the Christian world we still find people who have sudden epiphanies about their faith. I think these are the same people who slept through Sunday School years ago and are just now catching up.

Not long ago, I went back for a high school class’ reunion. I hadn’t seen most of the people in quite some time. Those that were jerks in high school were still jerks as grownups. The people who were “wallflowers” in high school actually turned out quite well. However, what I found particularly interesting were the people who were heavy into alcohol and drugs or had promiscuous reputations in high school had all found Jesus. Some wore prominent crosses around their neck and it was kind of awkward trying to talk to them. When you asked them about what they were doing with their lives, they would inevitably tell you how Jesus had saved them. I never did find out anything else about them. I even had one guy quote me chapter and verse on the evils in the world today. I thanked him for his words but said I needed some more ice for my drink.

I guess the secret to finding Jesus is that you must have screwed up pretty bad somewhere along the line and, in desperation, you turn to the Bible where you have your revelation. What I find disconcerting though is that these people now feel they are authorities of the faith and unless you share their zealousness you are perceived as a heretic. I fail to see how those of us that didn’t screw-up, attended church, and practiced our faith accordingly were somehow not on a par with those who just caught on.

I don’t want to be too harsh on my friends who find Jesus though. After all, I would rather have them study the Bible than continue down a road of self-destruction. But guys please remember this, just because you’ve found the faith, doesn’t mean the rest of us have been napping.

First published: May 26, 2008

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2018 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life, Religion | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

THE PROBLEM WITH PILLS

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 6, 2018

BRYCE ON LIFE

– It’s pop-pop time around the clock.

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The size of the drug culture in our country is truly amazing. We start popping pills as little kids for vitamins and to treat such things as the common cold. As we get older, we take them for just about every ailment we have, be it for mucous, fungus, rashes, infections, aches and pains, or just to get high. Not sure what your problem is? Pop a pill. This mentality has led to the deaths of many entertainers. Instead of dealing with reality, we take a pill to buzz us up.

A few years ago, I was amazed by the number of pills my father took in the morning. It was easily a handful, and I looked at him like he was some sort of chemistry experiment. Since then, I was always mindful of the number of pills I took for whatever reason, and determined to stay away from them.

Lately though, pills have slowly crept into my life. I take a red pill to dry my sinuses, a blue diet pill, a little brown pill for my osteoarthritis. On the weekends, after working in the yard, it is not uncommon for me to pop some Advil to tackle body-aches. If I come down with a cold, it’s pop-pop time. Actually, I think a good Scotch is better medicine.

Whereas I wondered how my father had come to take so many pills, now I find I carry pills of my own wherever I go. And I believe the influx of pills is a disturbing sign of aging. I wouldn’t be surprised to learn the average pharmacist can probably guess your age based on the volume and types of pills you take.

Some people carry their pills in zip-locked plastic bags, others use designer purses and murses (I guess they want to make an impression), and others use well organized plastic trays, be it for the days of a single week, or for a whole month. As to the latter, much time is devoted to sorting pills into such trays. It’s rather impressive the number of pills they can contain, representing a substantial investment in money. Such pills are used for a regular regiment, but for other ailments, such as a cold, a generous backup of pills is maintained in our home base, be it prescription or over-the-counter.

So prevalent are pills in America, I would wager there is probably enough pills in the average household to fill a gallon milk jug. So, the mindset is clear; Got a problem? Pop a pill. Instead of using natural cures, take a pill as the panacea du jour. Want to feel up? Take a stimulus. Need to calm down? Take a depressant. Why I didn’t invest in the pharmaceutical industry years ago is beyond me.

This also explains why we will never find a solution for the opioid problem in this country; pills have become an intrical part of our way of life. Now where is my Fred Flinstone fix for the day?

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2018 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Drugs, Life | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

DEALING WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT

Posted by Tim Bryce on July 12, 2018

BRYCE ON COPS

– Should you be adversarial or respectful?

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I recently found myself embroiled in a passionate argument about law enforcement. Someone had posted a video on social media showing a man in his car eluding police allegedly after a road rage incident. He refused to stop until he pulled into his driveway at home. The fact he failed to acknowledge police commands and argued loudly when he was caught agitated the police who forced him to the ground and put him in handcuffs. A few of the viewers commented how outrageous the police acted and they would have done likewise in resisting arrest. In contrast, I made the remark the suspect only had himself to blame; had he done as he was instructed, I doubt it would have turned into an ugly episode.

This resulted in a firestorm of comments against me for taking the side of the police. Frankly, I was surprised by the push back. In my defense, I described how I was taught to drive years ago by my father, who said if the police pulled me over, to keep my hands on the steering wheel, do not argue, and treat the officer with respect saying, “Yes Sir” and “No sir.” As the police see a lot of people during the day, they know nothing about me and will naturally approach cautiously. As such, it wouldn’t pay for me to pose a threat to them by being a smart ass.

I found this advice to be invaluable over the years. By acting this way, I was able to talk my way out of a ticket on more than one occasion. Each time, as the officer saw I wasn’t a threat and was heeding his instructions respectfully, I was let go with a simple warning.

After explaining this on the posting, I was accused of being a wimp and should have stood my ground and taken the officers to task. One gentleman claimed it is necessary to resist the police, simply because they are looking for an excuse to impound your vehicle. I have never heard of this before, so I have no way of knowing if this is true or not.

The way I see it, law enforcement has a difficult job, and they meet a lot of strange people in their daily routine, some not exactly playing with a full deck of cards. My philosophy in dealing with the law is to demonstrate that I am not some kook who poses a threat to them. When this is established, I find it is relatively easy to have a rational conversation with them where I can explain my side of the story. Regardless of how I tried to rationalize it, others in the group thought I had behaved cowardly. The only thing I know, I probably get fewer tickets than they do.

In a way, I am reminded of the classic comedy routine by Chris Rock titled, “How To Not Get Your Ass Kicked By The Police.”

What bothered me about this little incident was the total disregard for law enforcement, portraying them as disreputable ogres who are to be fought with, not respected. I recognize not all law enforcement officers are perfect, but to have people openly provoke a confrontation doesn’t make sense to me. Frankly, this adversarial relationship is disturbing as I believe law enforcement serves a vital function for the community and should be appreciated for their efforts. Then again, maybe this is just another sign of our changing times. I grew up in an era when we were taught the police were our friends, but I have a feeling this is a lesson no longer taught. It disturbs me when I hear 29 officers were killed in the line of duty thus far this year (compared to 44 for all of 2017). Frankly, I’m surprised how patient and professional most officers conduct themselves in light of the animosity against them.

Next time you are stopped by law enforcement, keep your cool and act respectful, they are only trying to do their job and not get killed in the process.

P.S. – Perhaps the most imaginative way I’ve heard of someone talking their way out of a traffic ticket was the father of a friend of mine in Chicago years ago. The father, named Al, was a baker and typically worked the late shift. One night, as he was driving home in the wee hours of the morning, he was tired and anxious to get to bed. Consequently, he was driving a bit too fast.

As he passed a billboard, he spied a patrol car hidden behind it, undoubtedly running radar. Seeing the car pull out from behind the billboard, he knew he was going to be ticketed. Thinking fast, he pulled his car over to the side of the road, popped his hood open, jumped out and began jiggling his carburetor (Yes, this was before electronic ignitions). As expected, the patrol car pulled up behind Al’s car and the officer stepped out. Al looked up at him and said, “Oh, thank God you’re here. Something’s wrong with the carburetor and the car was running away on me. Boy, did it scare the heck out of me.”

The officer looked at Al, then the carburetor, and gave him a warning to get the car fixed before he got into an accident. Yes, he let him go. Brilliant, just brilliant, and a great story he told for many years thereafter.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2018 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Crime, Law Enforcement, Life | Tagged: , , , , , | 5 Comments »

WHY THE ESCALATION IN SUICIDES?

Posted by Tim Bryce on July 5, 2018

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Is there a connection to the decline of religion?

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A couple of months ago, I produced a presentation titled, “The PRIDE Renewal Tour,” which noted the changes in our culture and what can be done about them. Among the subjects discussed, I reviewed a recent report from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) regarding how youth suicides have skyrocketed 70% over the last decade. “According to the CDC, nearly 45,000 Americans age 10 or older died by suicide in 2016, making it the 10th leading cause of death.” It is also the 2nd leading cause of death among young people, ages 15-24.

According to Tom Simon, one of the authors of the CDC report, the increase in suicides is not limited to just our youth, “We know that overall in the US, we’re seeing increases in suicide rates across all age groups.”

This was amplified by the recent suicides of designer Kate Spade and celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain. Although it is unclear as to precisely why they decided to take their own lives, it was reported they suffered from depression. Despite their success, they simply couldn’t find happiness and contentment.

From their deaths, the public is slowly becoming aware of the growing trend in suicide, particularly among our youth. So what is causing this, failure? This certainly was not the case with Spade and Bourdain. Perhaps it was triggered by the influx of drugs and technology. Maybe it is simple depression, which has also been growing over the years. A recent REPORT claims “15 percent of the adult population will experience depression at some point in their lifetime.” Of that, “nearly 50 percent of all people diagnosed with depression are also diagnosed with an anxiety disorder.”

Again, we can look at the influences of drug and technology addiction, but I believe it goes deeper than this, specifically a loss of meaning in life which particularly affects our youth. To this end, let us consider the slow erosion of our MORAL VALUES as reported annually by the Gallup organization.

I have been following this since 2012 and in just the past six years alone, there has been a noticeable decline; when asked, “HOW WOULD YOU RATE THE OVERALL STATE OF MORAL VALUES IN THIS COUNTRY TODAY?”

2012 2018  
20% 14% EXCELLENT/GOOD
36% 37% ONLY FAIR
43% 49% POOR

We can blame this erosion on the media’s distorted views of morality, the failure of the family unit to properly teach their youth, and the decline of organized religion. As to the latter, both Gallup and Harris have produced polls showing the belief in a Supreme Being is slowly declining. Further, attendance at religious institutions is also dwindling; “65 percent of churches are declining or plateaued.”

Even more disturbing is fewer younger people are going to church which, of course, affects membership. Consequently, “for every new church that opens, four close.” For many years, churches and temples preached the lessons of right and wrong, but with fewer attendees, these lessons now go unheeded. It has become glaringly obvious to churches they must change in order to survive, be it the venue or how to disseminate their message.

More importantly, STUDIES make a direct connection between the rise of youth suicides on a loss of sense of purpose as derived from the decline of religion. In other words, as religion declines, youth suicides skyrocket. It is not a coincidence.

We would like to believe money, fame, and success leads to happiness. As evidenced by celebrities such as Spade and Bourdain, this is not the case. It’s a matter of how we see ourselves, our role in society, and learning to live a meaningful life, which are all lessons we should learn from our family, our schools, and our places of worship. However, if we do not support such institutions, we are doomed to watch our suicide rate continue to escalate unabated.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2018 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

HOW ABOUT A LITTLE PATRIOTISM FOR THE 4TH?

Posted by Tim Bryce on July 3, 2018

BRYCE ON INDEPENDENCE DAY

– The virtues of a home town parade.

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I have always enjoyed the charm of a local Independence Day parade. In my old hometown of Wyoming, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati, the streets would come alive in the morning with the sounds of fire truck sirens, the High School marching band, and numerous neighborhoods dressed in red, white and blue and marching in the parade. Local politicians would ride in the parade and wave to the crowd. A friend of mine used to live at the start of the parade route and would have coffee and donuts available for the fire and police departments as well as parade organizers. People lined the streets, waved flags, and had a great time. Some of the neighbors along the parade route would roast hot dogs. It wasn’t about politics, it was simply a great way for the community to pull together in honor of the country. I am pleased to say they continue this tradition to this day.

Unfortunately, it is not the same in my current hometown of Palm Harbor, Florida who has yet to discover the benefits of this community event. I would have thought the American Legion, the VFW, the Masons, or the local Chamber of Commerce would have pushed for such an event, but not yet. Maybe they think it is too hot for such a parade or that not enough people would show any interest. I hate to say it, but Cincinnati gets every bit as hot as Florida during the summer, perhaps more so. And there should be sufficient interest as neighboring Safety Harbor hosts such a parade. I wonder what they know that we don’t? It would be nice to see the local community pull together and demonstrate a little unity on America’s birthday.

No, this is not about taking a knee and protesting. It’s about community spirit, pride, and teaching patriotism to our youth, plus having a little fun while we’re at it. Are we so polarized that we cannot simply enjoy our community and country? I’m not there to represent a political party or ideology as that is not the point. Instead, I attend such functions as a proud American.

As we all know, the Declaration of Independence was signed on Thursday, July 4, 1776 in Philadelphia. A copy was then taken by courier to General Washington who was currently stationed in New York City with his troops preparing to engage the British. It took some time for the document to reach Washington as it was delivered by horse rider, not by text messaging, e-mail, or Morse code for that matter. Consequently, Washington received it two days later on Saturday, July 6th, along with a letter from John Hancock as president of the Continental Congress.

After studying the DOCUMENT, Washington ordered his troops to assemble in Lower Manhattan on Tuesday, July 9th at 6:00pm, where Washington’s officers read the Declaration to all of his troops. Local citizens were allowed to attend as well. For the general, the document was very timely as it provided the rationale for breaking away from Britain and creating a new nation, thereby motivating his troops.

The words in the Declaration were so inspirational, New Yorkers raced down Broadway where they toppled and decapitated a statue of King George III. This was later melted down and used for ammunition against the British. It must have been quite a sight.

Since then, America has celebrated the 4th of July as an important event in our history. I do not believe the founding fathers would be overly impressed by some of today’s home town parades, but I am sure they would appreciate the love and affection we still hold for our country.

Happy Independence Day!

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2018 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

OLDSTERS ARE COOL!

Posted by Tim Bryce on June 21, 2018

BRYCE ON LIFE

– The wit and wisdom of our seniors.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

It’s cool to be an oldster. You really do not appreciate it until you reach your sixties when your offspring are grown up and in the work force. People look at you differently, thinking you are past your prime and should be retired. It’s kind of like, “Okay Old Man, sit in the corner, eat your cookie, and we’ll take it from here.”

I have a problem with this as I still have a few dances left on my card.

Young people do not believe you can keep up with the pace of today, that you possess knowledge from a by-gone era that is no longer applicable. It disturbs them greatly when you demonstrate you know how to use their technology, not just as well but better than they do. The young people also think you dress funny, especially when you wear a suit and tie, and that you cannot comprehend the jargon, entertainment, or customs of today. They are particularly mystified when you say or do something politically incorrect and it doesn’t seem to bother you.

What oldsters lack in the customs, vernacular and technology of the day, they make up for in hutzpah, guile, and bravado. Their values may be different than the youngsters, but their experiences make them resourceful and a fountain of information. Even better, they have developed a sense of humor laced with wisdom. To illustrate, I have assembled a Youtube! playlist featuring the wit and wisdom of oldsters, which you can access HERE. Some of these stories are funny, some poignant, and others simply entertaining. The intent of is to give young people a glimpse into the mind of the oldsters, how they think, what they have learned, and their perspective on life. From it, you should be able to glean the mindset of oldsters, that they are not obsolete and want to prove their worth.

As for you oldsters out there, you’ll love this immensely.

These essays remind me of the story of two bulls, one old and one young, who were standing on a hill overlooking a herd of cattle. Being a bit impetuous, the young bull said to his elder, “How about we charge down the hill, snort loudly, and make love to a couple of cows?” The old bull replied, “I have a better idea; let’s quietly sneak down the back of this hill, slip around from behind, and get the whole herd.”

The message from these video clips is simple: Giving up is the ultimate tragedy. As long as we have a breath to breath, we need to demonstrate our worth, otherwise it is time to pack it in.

Mark Twain summed it up in terms of how young people perceive oldsters: “When I was a boy of 14, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be 21, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years.”

Then again, Mark Twain was an oldster when he made this observation.

P.S. – Congratulations to 65 year old trainer Bob Baffer and 52 year old jockey Mike Smith on winning the Triple Crown aboard Justify.

Keep the Faith!

P.S., Be sure to see my video, “The PRIDE Renewal Tour,” on YouTube.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2018 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

THE LOSS OF A “GOOD” FRIEND

Posted by Tim Bryce on June 12, 2018

BRYCE ON LIFE

– We should relish those who make life more bearable for all of us.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I guess I am now of the age where one starts to see their friends slip away, be it old school chums or others. For example, I recently experienced the passing of a good friend, Ro Ambrose, who lost a valiant fight to breast cancer, a disease she had been fighting for approximately fifteen years. This one hurt, not just because she was a dear friend, but for other reasons.

I have known Ro and her family for about twenty years, starting with the softball fields of Palm Harbor where I used to coach in Little League. Ro had never played the game in her youth but fell in love with the sport through her daughters. So much so, when I suggested starting an adult co-ed team she was the first to sign-on. We called ourselves “Chico’s Bail Bonds,” named after the original “Bad News Bears.” Our team gelled from the time we first took the field. We were competitive, but were mostly looking for an outlet to let off some steam after work and get some exercise. We also enjoyed libations and a little Karaoke afterwards. During the game we would distract the opposing team by cooking brats with peppers and onions in our dugout, which turned out to be a rather shrewd maneuver.

Although Ro never played softball before, we watched her improve her batting average, going from .364 to an impressive .462. She took batting practice every chance she could, was always early to the field on game day, but her trademark was to run out every hit and base on balls, much like Pete Rose. She just loved the game.

Ro possessed a great sense of humor and her laugh was infectious. So much so, everyone wanted to make her laugh. She was also an excellent cook, but more importantly she cared deeply about people and was always willing to help anyone in their hour of need. She was gracious, classy, hardworking, thoughtful and very kind. As we both worked in the Information Technology field, we would bounce technical issues against each other from time to time. She was proud of and hopelessly devoted to her husband, daughters, and grandchildren.

When she first contracted her disease she was determined not to let it stop her. Ro possessed an indomitable spirit. When asked, she would candidly tell you what her condition was and where she stood in her treatment, but she was more interested in the welfare of others. It was like, “Okay I’ve got this, I’m dealing with it, now let’s move along.” I never heard her complain about anything or anyone, least of all her condition.

Over the years we drifted apart, but now and then one of us would pick up the phone and call the other, and it seemed like it was just yesterday. If you were ever having a down day, you gave Ro a call and she would pick your spirits up. She was very inspirational in this regard.

I guess the reason Ro’s passing really hurts is that she was one of those rare pearls you seldom find in life. We now live in an age of immoral behavior, cutthroat business tactics, and a general disrespect for the human spirit. What we read in the news can turn the best of us into a pessimist. So, when we meet someone like Ro, who was the personification of goodness, we realize how lucky we were to have known such a person. So when that person is gone, it hurts, a lot.

I am certain there are other Ro Ambroses out there, so maybe it’s time to rekindle our relationship and let them know how much we appreciate them. As for me, I’ll miss her laugh, her thoughtfulness, and her heart of gold. Alas.

Keep the Faith!

P.S., Be sure to see my video, “The PRIDE Renewal Tour,” on YouTube.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2018 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

 
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