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Archive for the ‘Life’ Category

THE SOCIAL CHANGES FROM CORONAVIRUS

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 7, 2020

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Is there a silver lining to this panic?

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I have found the social changes resulting from the coronavirus (COVID-19) to be fascinating. Most people appear to be staying home, minding their own business, and avoiding human contact either by choice or forced to do so by government regulations. As evidence, there is a groundswell in home improvement projects (just ask the hardware super stores whose profits are soaring). Other people are learning new cooking recipes, surfing the Internet, playing computer games, and watching a ton of television. My brother-in-law tackled a thousand piece jigsaw puzzle while sipping on some rather fine bourbon, and others are getting caught up on their reading. There are even fewer cars on the road, at least down here in Florida. Life has definitely changed since the panic began and the social ramifications are eye-opening.

The people who were asked to work from home or have been furloughed are bored, frustrated, and chomping on the bit to get back to work. When our doors finally re-open, we will likely witness a productivity boom the likes of which we haven’t seen since World War II. Likewise, children are restless and want to return to school. It is interesting to watch Americans react to the shutdown. No, this is certainly not a vacation or holiday as people are sensitive to their ability to generate income and have become rather restless.

One area I found particularly noticeable in neighborhoods is the need for human interaction. First, I have never seen so many people walking or bicycling around the neighborhood, be it alone, as a couple, or with kids and pets. I didn’t realize how many dogs there were in my neighborhood. I also see people walking around who I haven’t seen in a number of years, and frankly, I thought they had moved out of the neighborhood.

Most interesting is how people do not hesitate to stop and talk with their neighbors, usually at the end of a driveway or in a front yard. The virus has caused us to become more neighborly, to ask about each other, if everything is okay, and to lend a helping hand when necessary. Kindness and consideration seems to be the order of the day and a renewed sense of neighborly responsibility.

Since the restaurants and bars are closed, we are seeing people get-together, not in large parties, but simple get-togethers to talk and even play cards. Maybe bridge and pinochle will finally make a come back. Needless to say, the consumption of alcohol has increased and the stores are doing brisk business. People may not be able to get a drink at night, but if government regulators ever close liquor stores, there would doubtless be an open rebellion.

This phenomenon of neighbors becoming reacquainted with their neighbors is healthy for communities as Americans do better when they pull together in times of crisis. This reminds me of the classic 1941 Frank Capra movie, “Meet John Doe,” starring Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyk, whereby Cooper’s character goes on the radio to promote the concept of “love thy neighbor.” This results in a social movement whereby people renew friendships with their neighbors and help one and other. This becomes the basis for forming “John Doe Clubs” across the nation. It’s an entertaining film with an important message. It’s also vintage Capra.

Yes, I am aware we are suppose to practice “social distancing,” and I believe my neighbors understand this. I just find it interesting how the virus has forced people out of hiding and caused them to think about their neighbors, to lend a hand, to pick up and deliver supplies, or some small menial task. It is refreshing to watch. Maybe there is a silver lining to this panic after all.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Also, I have a NEW book, “Before You Vote: Know How Your Government Works”, What American youth should know about government, available in Printed, PDF and eBook form. DON’T FORGET GRADUATION DAY. This is the perfect gift!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Healthcare, Life | Tagged: , , , , , | 5 Comments »

THE COMPLICATIONS OF AGE

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 5, 2020

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Why are we faced with so many problems?

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I have discovered a new Bryce’s Law, to wit: “The older you get, the more complicated life becomes.” This came to me recently as I spoke with some contemporaries who have complained about the burdens accompanying age. I’m not talking about physical pain but rather the hectic pace of today along with the social ramifications accompanying it. I have one friend who is at war with his cable company who has not properly credited his account after overcharging him for several months. Another friend complains about the service policy of his two year old car, evidently nothing is free. And others express dissatisfaction with customer service issues or perhaps traffic has become overbearing or they are simply tired of waiting in lines, etc.

As for me, I have noticed physicians are less inclined to speak with you, the patient, and want you to go to a web site for follow-up questions, such as those regarding a diagnosis. I’m sorry, but it is not very “user friendly’ and I’m less inclined to visit a doctor again if I cannot speak to him. And as you get older, your patience grows thin to the point you want to blow your stack.

I believe as we grow older we assume more responsibilities, e.g., we purchase homes, boats, recreational vehicles, investments, etc.; we assume new responsibilities in our work requiring new skills; we have to fight with people at work, in our neighborhood, or perhaps in a nonprofit, and; children compound the problem as we may love them, but they take up considerable time and attention. We have to maintain all of this, which is not a problem when we are younger, but after the age of 60 we start to wonder why we do the same things over and over again. Maintaining all of these things requires considerable patience, something we start to lose over time.

We find we hate voice mail, sitting in traffic, ordering products on-line, communicating with idiot customer service reps, robo-calls, mysterious invoices for products we know nothing about, on-line banking, and an endless barrage of advertisements on television, none of which are aimed at our age group. Basically, we feel neglected and ignored. Normally we would argue and fight back, but now we’re too tired to do so. Because people have worn us down, we are less likely to be adventurous, and less likely to assume risk. We just do not want to step on any more meadow muffins.

And we finally stop and ask ourselves, “What the hell am I doing?”

The answer becomes rather obvious, we learn to keep things simple, the old KISS approach (Keep It Simple, Stupid). No, we no longer want to rip up and remodel the kitchen. It will keep. No, we no longer need the fancy sports car, just something that is easy to maintain and offers decent fuel efficiency. No, we no longer yearn to visit Timbuktu as we no longer want to drag all of our flotsam and jetsam with us, and what about the grandchildren, and besides, who is going to watch our pets?

No, “simplify, simplify, simplify,” is our mantra, and the only way to maintain our sanity.

Just remember, “Youth is our only true vacation in life, and our most unappreciated.” (another Bryce’s Law)

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Also do not forget my books, “How to Run a Nonprofit” and “Tim’s Senior Moments”, both available in Printed and eBook form.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

SHRINES OF EGO

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 3, 2020

BRYCE ON RELIGION

– Why are we building huge structures?

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Is bigger really better? Let me give you a scenario: a small church is started whereby the congregation and clergy tend to their faith and enjoy spiritual harmony. Inevitably, someone suggests constructing a bigger building to encourage membership. A mortgage is secured from a bank, construction begins, and indeed membership starts to grow. So much so, new facilities are added and modifications are made to the building until it becomes a landmark of the community. This, of course, forces the church to become more financially motivated to sustain their operations and recruiting campaigns are initiated to bring in more members. Suddenly, members begin to realize they are more consumed with the business of the church as opposed to practicing their faith, and membership begins to decline.

Feeling the effects of a financial squeeze, the church asks for more offerings from the congregation, which helps for a while, but membership continues to decline. Inevitably, the church can no longer sustain their operation and are forced to sell the property and move into more humble facilities.

Sound familiar? This scenario is played out every day not only in a multitude of churches and temples, but in fraternal organizations, nonprofit groups, and in small companies. The yearn to grow beyond their means is simply irresistible to some people. The problem is people tend to lose sight of their product, which, in the church’s case, is the spiritual well-being of the congregation. Any time you forget your mission, your product, you are inviting disaster.

So, is bigger truly better? Not necessarily. What we are seeing is a form of the Peter Principle whereby we grow our organizations beyond our level of competency to control. Personally, I tend to believe we build these huge edifices more for ego than for practicality. This puts us in a position of financially chasing our tail and losing sight of our original purpose. Next time someone suggests building something on a grand scale, instead of just asking, “What will it cost us?”, how about “Who is it going to really serve?”

Understand this, a week doesn’t go by where an ornate church or Masonic lodge isn’t put up for sale or demolished. If you find your leaders are more consumed about finances as opposed to the organization’s mission, the end is near.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Also do not forget my books, “How to Run a Nonprofit” and “Tim’s Senior Moments”, both available in Printed and eBook form.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life, Religion | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

FEBRUARY: BUSY HOLIDAY MONTH

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 11, 2020

BRYCE ON LIFE

– For a short month, we stay rather busy.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Even as a child, I always had a fondness for the month of February. It always seemed like the quirkiest month of the year. Maybe it is because it is the shortest month, or perhaps the first “R” in February is commonly pronounced silently. While seven other months have an extra day (31 in total), February was somehow shortchanged by two. Then there is the matter of Leap Year, which occurs every four years, whereby February picks up a day, yet is still less than all the other months. Imagine if your birthday was on February 29th, does this mean you only celebrate it every four years? One benefit would be your age would only be a quarter of what it is now, which would make me a teenager.

Other than the peculiarities of the calendar, February has some interesting days to celebrate:

Groundhog Day – this was my first indication that adults were truly mad. Why anyone would take their weather advice from a marmot was beyond me. The idea of the arrival of Spring was dictated by a groundhog is a bit much, even for a five year old. Yet, Americans seem to relish this day every February 2nd.

Super Sunday – for years, the Super Bowl was played early in January, shortly after all the college bowl games. Thanks to greedy owners though, the NFL championship kept getting pushed back until it finally settled on the first Sunday in February. This was probably done to give the players a couple weeks of rest until the next season begins. As an aside, I am old enough to remember the first Super Bowl in 1967 between Green Bay and Kansas City. As a fan of the old AFL at the time, I was disappointed until 1969 when Joe Namath and the NY Jets proved the viability of the league.

Valentine’s Day – this too was an odd holiday for youngsters to learn. I can remember dutifully making Valentine cards in elementary school and having to exchange them with the girls in the class. I prayed they wouldn’t get the wrong idea; after all, they had “cooties.” Other than that, this holiday reminds me of the Valentine’s Day Massacre in 1929 when Al Capone’s gang “rubbed out” Bugs Moran’s gang in Chicago. I found it interesting how they couldn’t pin the assassination on Capone. The police disguises were also a nice touch.

Aside from the mobsters, we should all use Valentine’s Day as a means to express our love and appreciation for others. It’s important.

President’s Day – is celebrated on the third Monday of the month and observes the birth of George Washington (Feb 22nd) and Abraham Lincoln (Feb 12th). This was an important date in grade school as it was used to teach us the significance of both presidents. As young children, we learned about Washington chopping down his father’s cherry tree, crossing the Delaware River, surviving Valley Forge, and becoming the “Father of our Country.” As for Lincoln, we learned he was an avid reader, a rail splitter, the President during the Civil War, and his assassination. We also learned the importance of his “Gettysburg Address.” Some of these lessons may seem rather shallow, but we probably learned more about these men than most of the kids in high school today. Historians today question the cherry tree story, but it served as an effective lesson in morality.

For a short month, we sure stay busy!

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Also do not forget my books, “How to Run a Nonprofit” and “Tim’s Senior Moments”, both available in Printed and eBook form.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

THE JOY OF SLOW COOKING

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 5, 2020

BRYCE ON COOKING

– It’s all in the rub.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Coming from the north, I was trained to cook meat rather quickly on an outdoor grill. Maybe it had to do something with the winter weather. Nonetheless, be it steaks, hamburgers or chops, the idea was to come home, slap some meat on the grill, throw some salt and pepper on it, flip it, and serve it up piping hot. This was matched by the warp speed by which we devoured the meal. From start to finish, maybe 15 minutes, tops. Then, off to watch the evening news (burp).

It’s not quite that way down here in the South where I have learned to slow things down while cooking. I now “rub” seasoning on the meat well beforehand (sometimes as much as 24 hours), put it on the top level of the grill, turn down the burner to low, and kick back and enjoy a drink or two while waiting for the meat to cook.

It is not uncommon for me to slow cook baby back ribs for two and a half hours. I stretch out the cooking of steaks and chops as long as possible depending on the size of the meat. Even simple chicken wings typically takes me close to an hour to cook. In other words, I have learned to become patient and not rush the meal.

A lot has to do with the seasonings I use. There are obviously many, but I typically use salt, pepper, garlic powder, Old Bay, paprika, cayenne pepper, and maybe some brown sugar. I rub this into the meat carefully and let it sit for quite awhile, overnight preferably. Only during the last 15 minutes will I consider applying a barbecue sauce, which I apply evenly, not outrageously. To me, it is the seasonings that enhance the flavor, not the sauce. The longer you let it sit on the meat, the better it will penetrate.

One trick I learned a long time ago was to cover steaks with a generous amount of Kosher salt. I usually put this on the night before, or possibly in the morning thereby giving it time to sweat the juices from the beef, causing it to become tender. I have used this on just about every cut of beef imaginable and it has never let me down. It can turn a cheap and tough cut of beef into something quite tender.

Taking your time in cooking allows you to kick back, enjoy a drink or two, and possibly watch a little television outside on the patio (Yes, this is what we do in Florida). In other words, I no longer play “Beat the Clock” when it comes to cooking. When I take my time, the food not only tastes better, it digests better, and I believe this is a preferable way of cooking then the frenzy of the north.

As I indicated, this approach is very popular in the South. Down here, people like to talk about “smoking” (and, No, I certainly do not mean cigarettes), the ingredients for their “rub,” the amount of time to cook something, and how good it looked and tasted. It’s not about competition, it’s about the constant quest for flavor. Interestingly, people down here enjoy watching barbecue cooking shows on television or the Internet, almost as much as they enjoy fishing.

My next challenge is to cook a prime rib on the grill. I saw a demonstration on YouTube which caught my fancy. Time to cook: two and a half hours. Watch the demo and you’ll start to understand why we like to do things slower in the South.

Bon appetit y’all!

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Also do not forget my books, “How to Run a Nonprofit” and “Tim’s Senior Moments”, both available in Printed and eBook form.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

PLEDGES, OATHS, VOWS & CODES

Posted by Tim Bryce on January 21, 2020

BRYCE ON MORALITY

– Do they mean anything anymore?

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I have been watching the History Channel a lot lately. I find as I get older there is little on the “prime time” channels that interest me. Instead, I find myself drawn to documentaries, biographies, and history, as well as classic movies (you know, the films they made before computers and had real scripts). Recently, the History Channel has been running a series on modern day gangs, both in and out of the prison system, and I have found it to be very interesting. These are gangs who have gone way beyond the Sharks and the Jets; bloodthirsty groups who stop at nothing to dominate a territory and extort money any way they can.

During the documentary, several current and former gang members are interviewed. Interestingly, one of the main reasons they join a gang is to establish a sense of family, a desire to belong to something in order to feel wanted and accepted, which is something they were not getting at home, regardless if they have parents or not. They are willing to pay dearly for this too, and voluntarily take a binding oath and suffer through a harsh initiation ritual, all for the sense of belonging. Such blood oaths and initiations leaves a lasting impression on the individual who dares not leave the gang, partially in fear of the consequences, but more as they desperately want the sense of family.

During our lifetime, we make a lot of pledges, and take certain oaths and vows. For example:

* “To love, honor and obey, until death do us part.”

* “To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law.”

* “I pledge allegiance to the flag…”

* “I will play fair, and strive to win, but win or lose, I will always do my best.”

* “I, (name), do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic…; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.”

As an aside, I find it interesting that all such oaths related to serving in American government or military end with, “So help me God.”

These pledges are all nice and sound impressive, but I find few people take them seriously anymore and reject them when it suits them. In other words, there is no real commitment to stand behind our words. Consider, for example, “The Journalist’s Creed” or the “Hippocratic Oath” as administered to physicians. If you read them carefully, you have to wonder how many people truly adhere to them.

Mechanisms such as pledges, oaths and vows are intended to define our code of conduct. This, of course, refers to our honor and ability to keep our word, something people use as a measurement of trust. I find it interesting that criminals have a higher regard for such things as opposed to John Q. Public. Maybe its because the criminal code has stiff penalties which will undoubtedly be executed if violated, and the person knows it. In our society though, there is no real penalty for violating our obligations, least of all shame or embarrassment. In other words, taking an oath or vow has become a joke in our society, and as long as it remains a shallow inconsequential ceremony, it will always be regarded as nothing more than a triviality to be implemented only when it is convenient to do so.

It’s no small wonder why today we have a deterioration of ethics, both in our homes and in the work place. It is one thing to enact legislation, quite another to enforce it. You can make all the pledges, oaths, vows, and codes you want, but if there is no real consequence for violating them, there is little point in administering them. The criminal class understands this. John Q. Public does not.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Also do not forget my books, “How to Run a Nonprofit” and “Tim’s Senior Moments”, both available in Printed and eBook form.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life, Morality | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

HOLIDAY REPETITION

Posted by Tim Bryce on January 14, 2020

BRYCE ON LIFE

– It has become rather predictable.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I happened to visit both my local drug store and supermarket on the day after Christmas. Interestingly, I noticed they were dutifully selling off holiday related food and items at rock-bottom prices, and starting to put out displays for Valentine’s Day in February. Of course, I have seen this drill many times before over the years, but it still struck me as odd to see red hearts and exotic chocolates even before the year came officially to an end.

In the United States, we have taken holidays to the sublime as there is something to celebrate or commemorate every day of the year. Fortunately, there are only a handful of “official” holidays requiring the closing of schools, banks, and government offices. Some, like Valentine’s Day and Halloween, may not be “official,” but represent a marketing bonanza for retailers. The obsession with holidays makes you wonder if Americans ever work anymore.

The main holidays observed by retailers include:

Valentine’s Day – February
Presidents’ Day – February
Saint Patrick’s Day – March
Easter, which is mid-April this year
Mother’s Day – May
Memorial Day – May
Father’s Day + Graduation – June
Independence Day – 4th of July
Labor Day – September
Halloween – October
Veteran’s Day – November
Thanksgiving – November
Christmas – December
New Year’s Eve – December

Many people also treat “Opening Day” for major sports as a holiday, as well as championship games. Regardless, these are the holidays retailer’s rely on to sell such things as cards, candies, costumes, libations, food, perfumes, and gifts. Car and truck dealerships take it a step further by offering discounts and rebates on vehicles during these holidays. Then again, they offer these same deals throughout the year; they just broadcast more advertising to show their pseudo-holiday spirit. Even television programming changes to match the holidays to put people in the proper mood. Come to think of it, when was the last time you saw a mattress company not have a sale on one of these days?

There are, of course, many more holidays, but these represent the bread-and-butter for sales purposes. These holidays are so repetitious and predictable, you can practically set the time of day by simply walking into a store. Maybe this is all intended to keep us on some sort of timetable to maintain the cash flow of merchants.

Unfortunately, I have been through this so many times, they have killed my holiday spirit. Instead of celebrating such holidays, they have taught me to loathe them, which is rather sad. I guess I just resent merchants telling me what and how to celebrate. Now I know where Scrooge picked up, “Bah! Humbug!”; at Walmart no doubt.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Also do not forget my books, “How to Run a Nonprofit” and “Tim’s Senior Moments”, both available in Printed and eBook form.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

THE LOSS OF A SPOUSE

Posted by Tim Bryce on January 7, 2020

BRYCE ON LIFE

– It is not the same as an elder.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Just before the holidays, I suffered the pain of losing my spouse due to complications resulting from COPD, something she suffered with over the last few years. I cannot begin to describe the incredible pain my family experienced as a result of her passing as it is very personal. I have attended a lot of family funerals over the years, including both pairs of grandparents, a set of great-grandparents, and my father. As much as we mourned their passing, it was somehow to be expected. The passing of a spouse though is different.

One of the first things I observed was the outpouring of sympathy and love by our friends, family, and the community during this terrible hour. We were overwhelmed. As a young man, I learned, “We enjoy life through the help and society of others.” This was particularly true since we lost my wife. People were very kind.

From this experience, I have learned there really is a lot of love out there among us, but we have somehow forgotten how to express it. It’s a shame we have to wait for tragedy to strike to express our feelings. Love represents such things as acceptance, affection and belonging. When you think about it, we all crave love but are either clumsy or mute in how to express it. There is nothing wrong with a hug, a handshake, a slap on the back, possibly a gentle kiss, or a word of kindness now and then. We, as human-beings, all need it. Just reach out and tell someone how you feel about them; take nothing for granted.

Since my wife’s passing, we have been on an emotional roller coaster. I think I’ve experienced just about everything;

* Denial, that she is gone. I still expect her to be there when I come home, with all her breathing tubes and medicine. In the morning, I used to prepare her medication, her breathing treatment, and her breakfast. I would also pick her a hibiscus flower for her in the morning and set it on the table to brighten her day. She was my delicate flower. Since her passing, I wanted to just hold her hand and talk with her again. I found myself even going into her closet to smell her clothes, just for the memory.

* I also experienced guilt, that I could have done something more in those last few moments, an image which will forever haunt me, but I felt so helpless. I felt like I let her down.

* I even felt a little anger; that she would leave me so suddenly. We all knew her day would come, but we weren’t prepared for it so soon. I always thought it should be the husband who passes first.

* In the end, I finally came to the conclusion that it was her time. That her lungs and heart had been through enough. And so, reluctantly, I had to accept she was gone.

Yes, her passing still hurts, but I am starting to figure a few things out; three things in particular:

First, I have learned how frail we are as human beings, both emotionally and physically. So it is important we enjoy every moment God has given us and take nothing for granted. It’s the little things in life that are more important than material possessions. For example, I always enjoyed giving her a kiss in the morning, and before going to bed. I still pick a hibiscus for her every morning. And I relished our talks, particularly this past year, and we laughed together, a lot.

Second, I have learned why the emotional pain hurts so much. As I mentioned, the passing of a spouse is different than someone from the family tree. If you have a strong marriage, you become one. Allow me to explain:

As a notary public, I have married a few people over the years. Before doing so, I admonish them that marriage is like dancing the Tango. “It takes two to Tango,” and it’s a matter of the couple working together as a team, both equals, in a spirit of cooperation, give and take. And if you do it right, it’s a beautiful dance; so is a marriage. And when your spouse passes, you are actually losing a piece of yourself, which explains why the pain is so hurtful.

As part of this, I have learned no matter what you do to help or comfort your partner towards the end, I can assure you it’s never enough, and you will beat yourself up over it. I know I have.

And third, I have come to the conclusion the pain never goes away; it never subsides; you just have to learn to live with it. There is no magic pill to get you through this, and sometimes you just have to take the pain; plain and simple.

I want to thank those of you for your kindness over our family’s tragedy. I cannot believe the overwhelming outpouring of sympathy expressed through cards, calls, and social media comments. I hope I can repay you someday. You really are special people, and I want you to know how much your love has affected us, and the spirit of my wife.

God bless you all, and goodnight my D.F.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Also do not forget my books, “How to Run a Nonprofit” and “Tim’s Senior Moments”, both available in Printed and eBook form. Great holiday gifts!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

2019 YEAR-END WRAP-UP

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 24, 2019

BRYCE ON EVERYTHING

– My most popular columns and audio segments this year.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

This is my last column for the year as I prepare to enjoy the holidays and rest up for 2020. As has become customary, I’m using this opportunity to review my top essays from the past year.

As you know, I write on a variety of subjects, such as management, systems, technology, social issues, politics, and observations of our changing world. Sometimes my work is instructional and informative, other times it is controversial or humorous. I certainly hope it isn’t boring. By the number of subscribers I have, their comments, and the hits I have on my web sites, I do not believe this is the case.

This has been a fiery political year and, as such, my political columns did very well. Nonetheless, what follows is based on my “hits” by my readers.

My top columns for the year were:

1. ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION: DO WE REALLY HAVE A PROBLEM? – Jan 4th – I began the year with a report from Sec. Kirstjen Nielsen of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) who gave a border security briefing to ranking Congressional leaders. Unfortunately, the Democrats were not interested.

2. PRESIDENT TRUMP VS. THE SQUAD OF FOUR – July 17th – How four female freshmen Congressional Democrats are pushing the party left.

3. WHAT EXACTLY IS AN ASSAULT WEAPON? – Sep 19th – I found it necessary to write this column after I discovered how naive Americans are about guns.

4. CAPITALISM VERSUS SOCIALISM: REFERENCE GUIDE – Mar 6th – Another educational piece aimed at describing the differences between the two ideologies. Most young people haven’t a clue as to the differences.

5. HOW I LOWERED MY CABLE BILL – Sep 24th – This was a non-political piece where I described how I brought my bill down. Hopefully, people found it handy.

6. RULES FOR DEPLORABLES – NEW BOOK – Oct 3rd – A review of a new book by Cathi Chamberlain describing the political tactics of community organizer Saul Alinsky and the Democrats.

7. IMPEACHMENT? WHO ARE THEY TRYING TO KID? – Oct 1st – The Democrats’ movement to impeachment was predictable (and frivolous).

8. ANTIFA UPDATE – Aug 27th – The hate group is quickly becoming a terrorist organization. When they are finally declared as such, they will finally be stopped.

9. WHO IS CREATING THE CULTURE OF HATRED? – Aug 13th – It certainly isn’t the Republicans.

10. TIME FOR A NATIONAL DEBATE ON SOCIALISM – Feb 13th – For a country so obsessed with Socialism, I’m surprised how many do not understand what it is.

HONORABLE MENTION

SOMETHING DOESN’T ADD UP – Apr 23rd – It’s amazing how politically naive young Americans are.

THE WHISTLE-BLOWER RULE IS WRONG – Nov 12th – And may very well violate the Constitution.

REPUBLICAN WOMEN GET ACTIVE – Oct 17th – and are pushing back.

BRYCE LAUNCHES NEW BOOK, “Tim’s SENIOR MOMENTS” – May 6th – On how we celebrate aging. I’ve been pleased with the response.

AUDIO SEGMENTS ON YOUTUBE

I also provide an audio version of most of my columns for those people on the go, courtesy of YouTube. I would like to believe people listen to me at the gym or beach, but more realistically, people tend to tune in while they are traveling or at work. Interestingly, the popularity of my audio segments is not the same as my written columns.

1. WHY WE HAVE TO TAKE ALEXANDRIA ORTEGA-CORTEZ SERIOUSLY – Jan 25th – She may appear goofy to us, but young people are listening.

2. THE TRUMP CULTURAL REVOLUTION – Mar 1st – How society has changed under President Trump.

3. REDISCOVERING THE DEAN MARTIN SHOW – Jan 29th – This was a non-political piece where I remembered Dean Martin as an entertainer. A lot of people enjoyed this column.

4. THE WITCH HUNT CONTINUES – Mar 25th – and ultimately found nothing in the end. What a waste of time and money.

5. ANTIFA UPDATE – Aug 27th – See #8 above.

6. TRUMP’S TAX RETURNS, PART DEUX – Apr 16th – There is still no requirement for the President (or anyone) to release their tax records to the public.

7. TIME FOR A NATIONAL DEBATE ON SOCIALISM – Feb 13th – See #10 above.

8. WHO IS REALLY THE RACIST HERE? – Jan 30th – Democrats have been conditioned accordingly.

9. IMPEACHMENT? WHO ARE THEY TRYING TO KID? – Oct 1st – See #7 above.

10. ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION: DO WE REALLY HAVE A PROBLEM? – See #1 above.

HONORABLE MENTION

SOMETHING DOESN’T ADD UP – Apr 23rd – how politically naive young Americans are.

PRESIDENT TRUMP VS. THE SQUAD OF FOUR – Jul 17th – See #2 above.

WHY ARE DEMOCRATS ABANDONING RELIGION? – Apr 30th – A very good question. Gallup contends they are.

I will be on sabbatical for awhile until I am ready to get back in the saddle. Merry Christmas.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Also do not forget my new books, “How to Run a Nonprofit” and “Tim’s Senior Moments”, both available in Printed and eBook form. Great holiday gifts!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2019 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

“I SCREWED UP”

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 5, 2019

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

– “The longer you delay admitting a mistake, the more expensive it will be to correct.” – Bryce’s Law

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Nobody likes to admit making a mistake. We tend to believe it makes us look bad in the eyes of our coworkers, friends and particularly the boss. It’s a real test of our integrity. Some people like to cover-up mistakes so they go undetected or, even worse, let someone else take the blame for them. I find mistakes tend to fester and grow if left unchecked, thereby causing bigger headaches and costing a lot more money if we don’t catch them in time.

Every once in awhile you have to look your boss straight in the eye and say, “I screwed up.” It’s kind of like having a priest listen to your confession. Although the boss may be disappointed, he will be appreciative of the fact you came clean with him early on and brought the problem to his attention where it can be caught and corrected with minimal damage.

In this day and age of micromanagement you don’t see too many people willing to admit a mistake. They take on an assignment, get in over their head, and fail to yell for help in time. This does a disservice to the assignment, the people depending on you, and yourself. In business, it is not uncommon to see people rising above their level of competency (aka, “The Peter Principle”). In other words, they have been placed in a position where they are incapable of performing their job effectively. Keeping them in this position is a disservice to the company as well as to the person. Frankly, I think we have too many people in over their heads who refuse to ask for help, which I consider a pretty scary operating scenario.

We have all made mistakes we wish we could take back and correct, some small, others real beauts, but there is nobody out there without a blemish on their record, which is why we are all willing to forgive, provided the person comes clean with it early on.

There’s an old axiom in business that says, “If you make 51% of your decisions correctly, you will be a success.” I’m not suggesting we don’t strive for perfection, but we should all realize it is an impossibility. After all, the last guy who was perfect, they hung on a cross.

Originally published: July 15, 2008

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Also do not forget my new books, “How to Run a Nonprofit” and “Tim’s Senior Moments”, both available in Printed and eBook form. Great holiday gifts!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2019 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Business, Life, Management | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

 
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