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Archive for the ‘Life’ Category

MY TRIP TO THE GYM

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 17, 2017

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Things have changed over the years.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I joined a nearby gym recently. It’s the first time I’ve been back since I played football 45 years ago. Back then it was mostly free-weights with a lot of lifting involved. One of the first things I learned from this experience is how out of shape I am. Most of my exercise over the years was based on yard work, chasing after my kids, and trying to keep up with the sports teams I coached. Now that they have grown up and moved along, I guess I’ve become somewhat of a coach potato, hence the need to get my butt in gear. For someone who enjoyed working out years ago, it was a humbling experience.

Starting back up, I was mindful of how easy it is to hurt yourself if you are not careful. I was at least smart enough to know I was no longer a man in my twenties or teens, back when you had a strong back, and thought nothing of lifting heavy weights. Now I think before I act, which I have found to be a shrewd policy.

In terms of equipment, the gym I belong to is essentially no different than others. There are still some free-weights to lift, but most of the activity involves machines with built-in computers and televisions. If you are going to walk, run, or drive a bicycle, there are several cable television channels to choose from. Sometimes I watch business and news channels, but I have found myself gravitating to fishing and cooking. I’m not sure why. Maybe it’s because I would rather be in a cold stream somewhere than working out on this machine, or perhaps I am dreaming of some culinary delight they tempt me with on the screen. No wonder I’m hungry by the time I get home.

The machines also have various computer based options to track my heart rate, calories burned, distance walked or bicycled, rotations per minute, etc. Watching this, I feel like I am getting an on-line physical exam, checking my blood sugar, wind, pulse, prostate, testosterone level, sperm count, etc. I find I spend more time watching and analyzing the numbers and less focusing on the exercise itself. Maybe this is by design as well.

Being an early riser, it is common for me to work out in the early hours of the day, as well as after work. It struck me, people seem to deport themselves differently between morning and afternoon workouts. The morning crowd seems to be in a trance as they go through the motions of waking up. As such, it tends to be very quiet at this time of day. It is so quiet, I sometimes drop a weight to see if anyone is listening. They aren’t, as everyone is plugged into their ear buds and have zoned out the rest of the world.

The afternoon crowd also likes to tune out the outside world, but they seem to be a bit livelier and there seems to be some camaraderie in spotting and encouraging others. Whereas the morning crew tends to follow a regular routine, the afternoon people seem to be more willing to experiment with different exercises and push themselves a little harder.

I’ve also discovered what you wear at the gym seems to be very important. Men are more inclined to wear black or gray. Some wear baseball caps, either forwards or backwards. If they have obnoxious tattoos, they wear something to accent them for the world to see. Women wear a lot of spandex and yoga pants which reminds me of the old joke; there are three things that do not lie; little children, drunks, and yoga pants.

As one of the older people working out, I’m viewed somewhat as an oddity. Maybe it’s the simple tee-shirts and shorts I wear, which are somewhat similar to what I wore in high school gym class years ago. Or perhaps it’s my gym shoes which could hardly be called “state of the art.” Either way, the younger people give the “old guy” plenty of space.

I’ve also noticed women are much more sensitive to cleanliness. After working out on a machine, some women fastidiously clean the station with a sanitary wipe of some kind, regardless if they sweated or not. Men are polar opposites. They couldn’t care less about the cleanliness of a machine unless someone deliberately fouled the area. Even then, they still might proceed, regardless of the sweat or mucous involved.

As for me, I just quietly go about my business and try to keep to myself. I am not there for social interaction, but rather to try and work the kinks out after 45 years of lack of rigorous exercise. My entertainment at the gym doesn’t come from one of the many televisions there or from ear buds. Instead I prefer watching the idiosyncrasies of the other patrons.

In the end, my friends ask me, “So, do you feel better?” Physically, I guess so, but I haven’t felt any grand changes yet, but I do love watching the people. It makes my day.

Also published with The Huffington Post.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  ESTIMATING – GETTING IT RIGHT – No Virginia, there is no magic in producing a project estimate.

LAST TIME:  WHERE ARE THE ADULTS?  – While liberals run amok, the Republicans are firmly in control.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

CLEANING MY SOCK DRAWER

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 10, 2017

BRYCE ON LIFE

– What I found 25 years later or “How to upset the sock gods.”

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I recently cleaned out my sock drawer. Guys typically don’t like to clean out such drawers and I am no exception. The reason for cleaning it was because I recently bought some new socks and discovered I had trouble stuffing them into the drawer. I believe the last time I did so was 25 years ago when we first bought the dresser.

It’s interesting what you find when cleaning out a sock draw, it is akin to an archaeological dig. I discovered I had over 40 different socks, none of which matched. This got me wondering where their mates were. Perhaps they were consumed by the washing machine or dryer as part of some demonic sacrificial rite. 40+ socks though is a lot and I cannot imagine who would want them or what they would do with them as individual oddities. I always considered my socks unique and do not believe they could be confused for those worn by my children. So there either must be a sock heaven or sock thief loose in the house.

As I picked through the socks in the drawer I was reminded of the many different types and colors I wore over the last quarter century. The oldest ones were long and came way up my shin, almost to the knee. They may seem awkward today but at the time they were comfortable and effective for covering any exposed flesh between the bottom of your trousers and your shoes. I had others with various bands of elastic to hold them up. Some had lost all elasticity and were rather droopy which is probably why I neglected them. By today’s standards, several socks looked rather strange and archaic. I suspect I would look like a spaz wearing them, and probably twenty years ago as well.

Most of the socks were either black, dark brown, or navy blue, but I also had some lighter colors which, in hindsight, probably made me look like a used car salesman. Fortunately, I didn’t have a white belt or shoes to accompany them. I learned my lesson wearing light colored socks and have stayed with darker colors in recent times.

I felt a little guilty cleaning out the drawer. My first inclination was to say, “But what if we finally find the mates?” I also had a fleeting notion they would make good dust rags, but my wife wanted no part of them. Finally, I came to my senses and purged all of the orphans into the garbage can thereby leaving only my new socks in the drawer all neatly paired up. I felt a sense of satisfaction for finally cleaning out something that was well overdue. My satisfaction was short lived though; about two weeks after cleaning out the drawer I happened to notice a new single sock sitting alone without its mate. My guess is that I had upset the sock Gods who demanded another sacrifice, either that or my wife is deliberately trying to drive me insane. Either way, I give up. It will be more than 25 years before I try to clean out a sock drawer again. Maybe some things are best left undone.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  IN PRAISE OF MENTORING PROGRAMS – Once almost extinct, mentoring programs are making a comeback.

LAST TIME:  WHAT THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON WAS ALL ABOUT  – It is much more than just female rights.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in humor, Life | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

TOO MANY TALKING HEADS

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 6, 2017

BRYCE ON THE MEDIA

– We should thank Howard Cosell for this.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Just prior to Mr. Trump’s inauguration, he placed a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers in Arlington, Virginia with VP-elect Mike Pence. As I happened to be in the office at the time, I watched it on-line through a Fox News feed less the usual background chatter from a reporter describing every detail. Frankly, I enjoyed it immensely and saw it as a dignified ceremony. There were no pesky commercials and no talking heads which I normally find irritating.

Throughout the rest of the inauguration, I watched other related events on-line or on C-SPAN, including the parades and balls. Whenever I turned on the television to a commercial channel, I was bombarded by nonsensical trivialities by the news anchors, forcing me to change channels as I had enough of their blather and wanted to watch events on my own.

I understand the need for sports anchors to report play-by-play activities over the radio, but I think we’ve gone too far on television where every scratch and itch is scrutinized. Frankly, I don’t need it, nor want it.

I blame newscaster Howard Cosell for this phenomenon. Back in the early days of ABC Monday Night Football, Howard loved to hear himself talk when others tried to let the camera tell the story. Cosell’s dialog was so irritating, tavern owners across the country began to run pools; if you won, you had the honor of throwing a brick through the TV set when Cosell’s face first appeared on the screen. This was unsettling to Howard, but he did nothing to change his style as an obnoxious broadcaster.

Today, there is a whole new generation of Cosells, not just in sports but in politics as well. Instead of allowing someone to speak, such as a Congressman or the President, there is a tendency to either interrupt the person or talk over what they are saying. The fact I tuned in to see a political figure talk doesn’t mean I want to know the spin of the news reporter. Let me watch the presentation and you can analyze it afterwards, although there is no guarantee I won’t change the channel.

Enough is enough. The anchors should learn to shut-up before people tune them out in favor of uninterrupted on-line coverage. If people want to listen to the anchors, fine, let them access it through the SAP button on their remote control.

As an aside, in the movie “Sleeper,” featuring Woody Allen who wakes up 200 years in the future after undergoing a minor medical procedure, his character is asked to identify various artifacts from the 20th century. Included was a video of Howard Cosell reporting on sports. The scientist asks Allen, “We didn’t know exactly what this was; we’ve developed a theory, we feel that when citizens in your society were guilty of a crime against the state, they were forced to watch this.”

To which Allen’s character replied, “Yes, that’s exactly what that was.”

That’s how I feel about today’s talking heads. Thanks Howard.

Also published with The Huffington Post.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  WHAT THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON WAS ALL ABOUT – It is much more than just female rights.

LAST TIME:  BASEBALL CARDS  – Are they a commodity or a memento of our youth?

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life, Media | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

BASEBALL CARDS

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 3, 2017

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Are they a commodity or a memento of our youth?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Something near and dear to a young man’s heart is his collection of baseball cards. Although cards today are bought and sold as a commodity, years ago we collected them simply because of the love of the game. My friends and I would trade them, discuss the stats of each player, and chew the lousy gum accompanying each pack of five cards. We would also attach them to our bicycles using clothespins so they would flicker between the spokes of the wheel thereby making a rather impressive sound as you were riding, something like a motorcycle, at least so we thought. In my day, you weren’t cool unless you had a Stan “The Man” Musial baseball card powering your bicycle. In hindsight I wish I had kept that card as opposed to ruining it on my bicycle, but such is life.

The nirvana of baseball cards in my day was to get Mickey Mantle’s (see accompanying photo). As a kid growing up in the New York area in the early 1960’s, Mantle was a god to us. Sure, we watched other teams and other players, but there was something special about the Mick. So much so, obtaining his baseball card meant a step up in your social stature. Fortunately, I got mine in a regular pack of cards and I was the envy of my friends. I was offered stacks of cards for the Mantle card but I stubbornly held on to it, and I’m glad I did. I was even offered a Willie Mays, Roger Marris, and Whitey Ford. If he had thrown in a Yogi Berra I would have been tempted, but such was not to be. Besides, I had a couple of Willie Mays cards already.

Most of my card collection ended up in a shoe box where I kept them neatly organized. For my really good cards I’ve got a special binder with plastic sleeves which keeps them neat and clean. As the cards were important to me, I kept them hidden in my bedroom. As I grew up and moved away to college, the card collection remained hidden in my room. It’s a good thing I hid them too as my room was purged and cleaned by my mother after I moved out. As is common for moms to do, she disposed of my old comic book collection and “Mad” magazine collection, both of which dated back to the early 1960’s. I’m not sure why mothers do this, perhaps as a form of revenge for leaving the nest, but I know a lot of guys who lost such collections, not to mention coin and stamp collections. Moms view such things as nothing more than dust-catchers, guys cherish them as mementos of their past.

Today, baseball cards are bought and sold at hefty prices, a lot more than the nickel we used to pay for a pack and probably without the bubble gum. In my day, “Topps” was the only manufacturer of baseball cards. Today, there are many others, but I can’t say the quality is any better. Some now have special stamps emblazoned on them, some come packaged in air tight plastic containers, and some are real works of art. Whereas baseball originally had a monopoly on such cards, today there are cards for football, hockey, basketball, soccer, even wrestling, entertainment and politics. I still don’t think I would trade my Mickey Mantle for a Barack Obama, no way, no how. I would be much more interested in a Jackie Robinson or Satchel Page, but I think I would still hold on to the Mick.

I still appreciate the simplicity of the cards from years ago. In preparing for this article, I brought out my baseball card binder so I could scan the Mickey Mantle card. Afterwards I stopped by a friend’s house and showed him the binder. He enjoyed it immensely and as he flipped through it we would discuss the various players, what teams they played on over the years, their statistics, memorable moments in their playing careers, and argue over who were the better players. A lot of baseball ears should have been burning that day. Then again, that’s what we did as kids, we talked baseball, and this is what I think baseball cards were originally designed to do.

I just wish I still had that Stan “The Man” Musial card instead of ruining it on my bicycle.

Also published with The Huffington Post.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  TOO MANY TALKING HEADS – We should thank Howard Cosell for this.

LAST TIME:  WHAT HAPPENED TO THE TRAVEL EXPENSE REPORT?  – Are your employees abusing travel expenses?

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life, Sports | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

TECHNOLOGY CLAIMS ANOTHER VICTIM

Posted by Tim Bryce on January 30, 2017

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Farewell to the “Greatest Show on Earth.”

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

It was recently announced the legendary Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus, “The Greatest Show
on Earth,” would be closing in May 2017. To fans of the circus, the news was devastating as it had become an institution after 145 years of operation. Like so many families, I took my children to see the circus at a young age. They were fascinated by the trained elephants, tigers, horses, and various other animal acts. The trapeze performers and high-wire acts were also a favorite.

My daughter particularly enjoyed “King Tusk,” a massive elephant, and the animal trainer Gunther Gebel-Williams. My son was more interested in the clowns and their shenanigans. The acts and names of the performers changed over the years, but the excitement of the circus seemed to go on unabated, until recently.

In a letter recently posted to the Ringling web site, Kenneth Feld, the Chairman and CEO of Feld Entertainment, the producer of the circus, broke the news to the public. Last year, the circus removed the elephant acts due, in large part, to animal rights activists who thought the animals were being mistreated. With the elephants gone, the circus started to diminish. To make matters worse, the attitudes of youth today are changing in terms of entertainment. They are now more imbued with the Internet and computer games than watching live performances, thus causing the death knell of the circus and other forms of live entertainment.

The average price for a ticket was affordable for families, but couldn’t sustain a traveling circus. Ticket prices were much less than Cirque du Soleil which are staged in fixed indoor venues, such as in Las Vegas, Orlando, and New York.

The passing of the circus into memory is another indicator of how technology affects the human spirit. It is sad to think that in the not too distant future, the only way we will be able to experience a circus will be through virtual reality glasses.

Another symptom of technology’s influence is in the area of shopping. Year after year, on-line shopping is said to be making great strides against shopping malls, particularly at holiday time. Unlike retailers in a mall, who have the overhead of renting space and paying for utilities and on-site personnel, on-line shopping has none of these concerns and, as such, can offer products more cheaply. The only time mall retailers have the advantage is when it is necessary to “touch and feel” a product, such as when selecting furniture, a major appliance, and automobiles. Even here though, on-line shopping is being strongly embraced by young people trained in the use of the Internet. If they do not like the product, they simply return it for a refund. Here again, we are losing the personal touch, our sense of customer service and basic salesmanship.

There are trade-offs for the extended use of technology; it may be useful to expedite a sales order or transaction, but at what price? The care of the customer? Or how about the decimation of an old institution such as the circus, where children of all ages sat and marveled at the abilities of man and beast? I, for one, will miss it greatly.

By the way, the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus will conclude its tour at the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Uniondale, NY, on May 21, 2017. Be sure to see it before it fades away into memory.

Also published with The Huffington Post.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  WHAT HAPPENED TO THE TRAVEL EXPENSE REPORT? – Are your employees abusing travel expenses?

LAST TIME:  FACING REALITY  – People plain and simply don’t want to know it.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life, Technology | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

2016 YEAR-END WRAP-UP

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 23, 2016

BRYCE ON JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING

– My most popular columns this year.

This is my last column for the year as I prepare to enjoy the holidays and rest up for 2017. As has become customary, I’m going to use this opportunity to review my top essays from the past year.

It was a busy year in 2016. In addition to my blog, I have been writing for News Talk Florida and the Huffington Post which is rather amazing when you consider the liberal slant of the Post.

As you know, I write on a variety of subjects, such as management, systems, technology, social issues, politics, and observations of our changing world. Sometimes my work is instructional and informative, other times it is controversial or humorous. I certainly hope it isn’t boring. By the number of subscribers I have, their comments, and the hits I have on my web site, I do not believe this is the case.

For my year-end column, I researched my statistics to see which were my most popular. As 2016 was a major election year, I have considerable political columns which did well, as you will see. Therefore, here are my “greatest hits” for 2016.

NOTE: You can find the audio versions for many of these columns on My Web Page.

GENERAL POLITICAL

“Florida Vote-by-Mail Request & Early Voting Statistics “ – this was my #1 column of the year as I updated it on a daily basis for two weeks. Those concerned about the election outcome in Florida paid particular attention to this piece.

“Why The Electoral College Matters” – following the election, Democrats had a problem understanding the difference between the popular vote and the electoral college, hence I wrote this column which enjoyed wide circulation.

“So you’re thinking of voting independent are you?”

“Shocking the Press” (aka, “The Media Is Reeling From This Election Result”)

“Election Post Mortem” – a good review following the election.

“The Attack of the Wusses” – another follow-up piece after the election.

“The Problems with Political Polling” – explaining the flaws in polling.

“Au Revoir Democratic Party” – written after Nancy Pelosi won again the House Minority leader.

HILLARY CLINTON

“A Look Back at Hillary Clinton’s Record” – this column was heavily referenced prior to election day.

“Book Review: Crisis of Character” – also frequently referenced.

“Clinton still favored by Vegas and British bookmakers” (aka, “Odds Are Donald Trump Remains A Good Bet For President”) – a fun piece on gambling and the election.

“What it means to vote for Hillary Clinton” (aka, “Hillary Clinton: Why You Shouldn’t Vote For Her”)

DONALD TRUMP

“Why I’m Voting for Donald Trump” – my most frequently read article from my Trump series.

“What I learned attending a Trump Rally” – the lessons regarding the press was interesting.

“Understanding the Trump Personality” (aka, “Understanding the Type A Personality”) – this is still a worthwhile read for anyone who wants to understand our President-Elect.

“Candidate Trump Visits Tampa Bay One Last Time” – over 20,000 people were there.

“What Do We Know about Mr. Trump?” – this column too was frequently referenced.

“The Democrats are Scared” – and they had good reason to be.

“Donald Trump’s Plan: Jump Start The Economy” – at the start of his Victory Tour.

LIFE

“Leave it to the Cops” – very popular piece on the responsibilities of law enforcement personnel.

“It’s Wednesday and I’m already sick of the Olympics”

BUSINESS

“How Can Allegiant Airlines Survive?” – based on personal experience.

“What Ever Happened to UNIVAC?” – a bit of history regarding the first commercial computer.

“Microsoft Dusts Off Speech Recognition” – I was surprised by the popularity of this piece.

“Proof of Technology Addiction” – includes an important message on the use of technology.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year everyone!

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

LAST TIME:  ENJOY EVERY MOMENT  – And take nothing for granted.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Business, Life, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

ENJOY EVERY MOMENT

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 21, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– And take nothing for granted.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Christmas is rapidly approaching and if 2016 taught me anything, it is to enjoy every moment.

I had a doctor friend pass away a couple of months ago. At 65 years old, he appeared to be in the pink of health, but was suddenly struck down by Leukemia and a stroke. Despite all of the attempts to save him, which were considerable, he lasted 103 short days before passing away. At the end, his body was emaciated, so much so, his coffin was closed for his funeral.

He was a good man, good father, trusted and dependable doctor, and was dedicated to his church. We would often see him at lunch at a nearby restaurant where we would discuss at length the world’s current events and share a few laughs. His wife is a peach with a great sense of humor. They were blessed to have raised a fine son and daughter, and were now beginning to enjoy their grandchildren.

His medical practice was successful which afforded him an opulent house on the Gulf of Mexico, sports cars, and season tickets to the Tampa Bay Rays. His passion for baseball included coaching his son and friends in Little League. He also possessed a civic duty and readily volunteered his time and donated money to several charities and his church.

Hundreds of people attended his funeral and during the ceremony several people stood up to say a few words in remembrance of him. His son struggled with the eulogy, but somehow got through it. Several tears were shed; it was quite touching.

Despite all of his success and generosity, watching him struck down so suddenly caused several of us to consider how precious life is and why we shouldn’t take it for granted. When you are young, there is a tendency to feel invincible, causing you to overlook life’s little intimacies which we should relish, but commonly overlook.

This was reinforced over the Thanksgiving holidays when we had a member of the family suffer through respiratory failure, but fortunately is now on the mend. It was scary for all of us. I had another friend whose mother tripped and fell just before Thanksgiving, thereby causing her to break her hip requiring surgery to replace it. Another friend had a foot operation, and several others experienced severe colds.

I mention this because we normally host a party at noon on Thanksgiving with friends and neighbors. We call it the “half time” party as it allows people to escape the kitchen for awhile and share a glass of cheer. Unfortunately, due to all of the medical problems, we couldn’t hold this little get-together this year, and we all missed the camaraderie.

From all of this, I’ve learned to appreciate every moment; to sit and talk, to laugh, to listen, to help and support, to take pride in our work and pastimes, to become a benefit as opposed to a burden on others, to be grateful for our health and the simple joys of life, to take nothing for granted, and to simply enjoy every moment.

Merry Christmas!

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  2016 YEAR-END WRAP-UP – My most popular columns this year.

LAST TIME:  WHERE HAVE ALL THE WRISTWATCHES GONE?  – They are slowly disappearing.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

GETTING BURNED

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 19, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Some people have to learn the hard way.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I had a situation where I was working with a young Systems Analyst who was ambitious but a bit naive as to the field of information systems. Nonetheless he wanted to boldly tackle a major systems project for his company and asked me for advice. I encouraged him to first study the parts of the business the system would serve, specify the end-user information requirements, and produce an overall system blueprint. “No, no, no, I’ve already got it worked out in my head,” he told me and started programming. Although he was very proficient in how to write program code, his software didn’t adequately serve the needs of his users and his project failed miserably.

Regardless of how you try to coach someone, I find it disheartening that a lot of people have to burn their fingers before they learn something. Maybe this has something to do with the cockiness of youth whereby there is a great temptation to leap before you look. It seems impetuousness has a lot to do with this, particularly for those who yearn to make a name for themselves. It’s one thing to have an academic knowledge of a subject, quite another to have practical experience.

When you try to use logic to persuade people, they want to argue with you. 2 + 2 is no longer 4, but 5 instead, or it’s no longer black and white but some shade of gray. When you use examples and case histories to illustrate your point, they believe it is an obsolete analogy to the subject at hand. Frankly, the people who tend to get burned are those who know just enough about a subject to be dangerous, and they will argue you to the ground simply because they are combative and want to wear you out. This leads me to believe there is a fine line between intelligence and stupidity.

I guess what I finally learned is there are certain people who need to get burned and learn the hard way. Consequently, I find I no longer argue as vehemently as before and let people make their own mistakes as long as it doesn’t affect me personally. I’ll still be willing to offer my advice, but I’m just not going to try to shove it down anyone’s throat.

In closing, I am reminded of the old story of two bulls, one old and one young, who were standing on a hill overlooking a herd of cattle. Being a bit impetuous, the young bull said to his elder, “How about we charge down the hill, snort loudly, and make love to a couple of cows?” The old bull replied, “I have a better idea; let’s quietly sneak down the back of this hill, slip around from behind, and get the whole herd.”

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  ENJOY EVERY MOMENT – And take nothing for granted.

LAST TIME:  WHERE HAVE ALL THE WRISTWATCHES GONE?  – They are slowly disappearing.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

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WHERE HAVE ALL THE WRISTWATCHES GONE?

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 16, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– They are slowly disappearing.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

My wristwatch recently broke and I had it taken in for repair. At first I kind of felt like a dog who had lost his collar, like an important part of me was missing. After awhile though, I got used to it and felt somewhat unshackled. I think the last time I was without a watch was back when I was in high school. Surprisingly, I discovered I didn’t miss the watch that much and may go on without wearing one. I have no problem knowing the time as I can find it just about everywhere, including my PC, in my automobiles, on television and radio, and general wall clocks. Cell phones and other personal electronic devices also maintain the time. So much so that young people imbued with the new technologies are less likely to wear a watch than their elders.

One of the reasons we wear wristwatches is as a status symbol, a sort of “coming of age” thing and is an expression of our personality. Gaudy and gold watches are worn by wannabe power brokers. Sleek watches are worn by people who want to appear hip and contemporary. The super-gadget watches are worn by the techno-geeks, and the basic sports watches are worn by the jocks and naturalists.

As watch wearing declines, watch makers are scrambling to make new models that will appeal to the younger generation and include such things as temperature readings, GPS, Internet access, multimedia or whatever. In a way, it will be reminiscent of Dick Tracy’s 2-Way Wrist Radio/TV.

However, I think the days of wristwatches as a status symbol are winding down. Young people do not seem to look upon the prestige of watches like my generation did or my predecessors. Basically, the watch has been replaced by the smart phone with its many different features, everything from simple phones to sophisticated devices that can be used for just about anything, e.g., camera, recording device, radio/television, dictation machine, etc. As for me, I’m waiting for a model that comes with either an electric razor or a phaser.

I see many friends and business contacts constantly trying to do one-upmanship over their smart phones. This doesn’t impress me, but then again neither did an expensive watch. Nonetheless, the transfer of status from watches to cell phones is a phenomenon that should not go unnoticed, as it is marking the end of an era, the start of another, and a change in our culture.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  GETTING BURNED – Some people have to learn the hard way.

LAST TIME:  POLITICS AT THE DINNER TABLE  – Do we use this as an opportunity to reason and discuss?

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Life, Society | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

POLITICS AT THE DINNER TABLE

Posted by Tim Bryce on December 14, 2016

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Do we use this as an opportunity to reason and discuss?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

During this past Thanksgiving holiday, we were admonished by several talking heads on television not to discuss politics at the dinner table in order to maintain peace and harmony. I vehemently disagree as I see this as more political correctness running amok.

As we all know, our young people are no longer learning the important lessons of civics and history at the high school level, and college professors are twisting American history in order to make us feel guilty about our past. Concepts such as “American exceptionalism” and “Manifest Destiny” are very much frowned upon by liberal professors who are busily rewriting history and reshaping the perspective of our past.

So, if youth is truly not learning the lessons of government, what better place to do so than at the dinner table? For starters we should use this opportunity to determine what our youth are learning in school, how it affects their perception of our country, and clear up any misconceptions. For example, ask about their patriotism. Do they stand for the flag and recite the pledge of allegiance? Do they regularly vote? Do they understand their responsibilities for serving on a jury? What is their understanding of current events?

Discussion should allow for the open exchange of ideas, not unilateral. I don’t mind an opposing view, but I want to know why they have it, and certainly do not want to ostracize the person. In my day, everything was on the table for review, including drugs, religion, politics, war, law and order, sex, etc. The discussion should be more in the form of a debate as opposed to hotheaded slander or sarcasm. Interestingly, I find this is more easily done with conservatives as opposed to liberals who are trained to passionately attack rather than reason.

As to history, discuss the necessity of the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. What were the events leading up to the Civil War, World Wars I & II, as well as Korea and Viet Nam? Do they understand the “Domino Theory” of communism? What are the differences between capitalism and socialism, or Democrats vs. Republicans, liberals vs. conservatives? What is gerrymandering and the electoral college?

There is a lot to discuss at the dinner table. Failing to discuss such subjects does nothing but promote ignorance and encourages misunderstandings that may lead to emotional meltdowns as we saw recently following the 2016 elections, but even worse, withdrawals from our obligations as citizens.

Christmas is rapidly approaching, and we’ll once again gather around the dinner table. If you want to stick your head in the sand as the pundits suggest, be my guest. As for me, I’ll have an extra helping of discussion with that turkey and dressing.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  WHERE HAVE ALL THE WRISTWATCHES GONE? – They are slowly disappearing.

LAST TIME:  OUR FIXATION WITH NAME SUFFIXES  – Do we make too much out of them?

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Life, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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