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Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

EMBRACING COMPLEXITY

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 14, 2017

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– It’s a matter of how many things we can juggle at one time.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

For years in my youth, I was the “go to” guy for operating the family’s technical equipment, be it tape recorders, record players, or even our Super 8 movie projector. As I grew older, I eventually relinquished my title to my son who is adept at setting up our High Def TV, cable box, DVD/VHS player, cell/smart phones, and other such devices. It was only when I realized we were as dependent on my son, as my family was on me years ago, that I began to ask why.

It is a long accepted theory that younger people tend to embrace and adapt to technology faster than seniors. I am reminded of the story told by comedian Jay Leno where he purchased a remote control for his parents’ television set. On a return visit to their home in Boston, Jay couldn’t locate the device and asked his father of its whereabouts. The father informed Jay they kept it locked up in a nearby drawer as he considered it a complicated piece of equipment and wanted to be sure it “wouldn’t go off accidentally.” Despite Jay’s attempts to assure him it wasn’t a phaser that could burn the house down, the father was unmoved and kept the device safely locked up. Whereas we tend to accept complexity in our youth, we grow abrasive to it as we grow older under the mantra, “simplify, simplify, simplify.”

In our youth we are more inclined to accept complexity as we assume it is a natural part of the learning process. As we mature, we learn to handle more responsibilities and assignments much like a juggler takes on additional objects to be thrown into the air. We keep juggling more and more objects until we reach our capacity and discover our limitations. Our arms deftly spin for years and years juggling everything until we grow weary and can no longer embrace any more items. In fact, we start to slow down, prioritize what we are doing, and drop those tasks we no longer consider important thereby simplifying our lives. In the Jay Leno example, the father had grown to accept changing the television channel manually and felt the remote control was simply one more thing to complicate his life. Consequently, he avoided using it, even going to the extent of fabricating an excuse.

In youth we are eager to accept new challenges as we want to prove ourselves ready to assume our place in society. As we master the subjects that interest us, we begin to exercise our skills and express ourselves creatively. Typically, our window of peak creativity is no more than ten years. To illustrate, both the Beatles and the Beach Boys, two of the most successful Rock and Roll bands of all time, were at their zenith of their careers for no more than ten years, as is true for most bands. The members of the bands ranged in age from their late teens to late twenties. In their thirties, they slowed down and were never able to duplicate the creative output of their earlier years. This phenomenon is not only true in the arts, but in the sciences as well. Our tempo slows, we prioritize our efforts, and we begin to focus on fewer things. Whereas we were eager beavers in our youth, we become more cognizant of our limitations and more selective in our challenges.

One reason young people are gravitating towards the Information Technology field is because of their ability to embrace complexity. For example, the average computer program consists of approximately 100 components (such as data elements, records, files, modules, etc.), each requires a series of design decisions based on type (e.g., a data element’s length, precision, scale, label, validation rules, etc.). In total, there are approximately 2,000 such decisions to be made and controlled, which is quite a challenge for anyone to track. Whereas younger programmers are more inclined to simply write and compile the software iteratively until it is clean, their older counterparts are more likely to carefully plan and document the software to avoid forgetting or overlooking the components used and the design decisions associated with them.

Whereas youth is quick to tackle complex issues, often to the point of recklessness, this inevitably leads to mistakes and causes us to slow down and become more cautious. As we grow older, we don’t mind tackling complex issues, but we are leery of making mistakes and, consequently, become wiser in how we tackle such undertakings. As we approach retirement and beyond, we are less likely to tackle bold new ventures and, instead, are more inclined to “simplify, simplify, simplify.”

Actually, if programmers weren’t so bad at designing devices to be easy-to-use, we wouldn’t be so dependent on our youth to operate them for us, but that is another subject. As a teenager, there were only two buttons on my family’s television set, one for on/off and volume, and a tuning dial. Today, God only knows how many buttons I have on my High Def TV; I know there is one for power, three for color, two to adjust screen positioning, and one to automatically call 911 when I’ve finally lost my mind.

Also published in The Huffington Post.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  TALKING TO YOURSELF – What it says about you.

LAST TIME:  THE STATE OF I.T. IN BUSINESS  – Have we really made progress?

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Technology | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

THE STATE OF I.T. IN BUSINESS

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 12, 2017

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Have we really made progress?

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Watching the speed by which Information Technology (I.T.) has changed over the last forty years has been amazing. Hardly a day goes by without some new twist or invention. In particular, my interest is in how I.T. can be applied to support the systems needed to operate a business, such as for manufacturing, inventory, order processing, customer service, accounting, human resources, and much more. I have seen a lot during the last four decades, perhaps too much.

On the physical side, I have watched computing go from mainframes to minis, to PC’s and Smart Phones. Instead of mere Local Area Networks (LAN), we now network through the Internet and share resources via “The Cloud.” By doing so, we have placed data entry and information retrieval into the hands of more people than ever before, be it internal users, or externally with customers and vendors. In the process though, security has become a serious problem.

There have also been drawbacks to computing’s diminishing size. By thinking smaller, we tend to focus on only a small part of the puzzle and have lost sight on the total picture of our systems. The physical aspects of computing may be seductive, but it has compounded problems within companies. To illustrate, data redundancy remains the Achilles heel of most businesses, be they large or small. It may seem odd, but it is certainly not unusual for companies to have multiple interpretations of such simple, yet important, data elements as “Customer Number,” “Part Number,” “Order Number,” and “Product Number.” Whereas there should be a single interpretation of each, there are multiple interpretations instead. Consequently, the opportunity to share and re-use such data is lost, and systems invariably lack integration.

The formulas for generated elements, such as “Net Pay,” “Order Total,” and “Earnings Saved” may also be redefined for each program written. This results in erroneous information throughout the business. For example, one user’s calculation of “Total Sales” may be entirely different than the values produced for other users. With such inconsistencies, the business will ultimately make poor decisions. It also means systems lack integration, thereby dividing the business units simply because of the lack of consistency, and leading to user complaints.

Despite the sophistication of today’s data base management technology, the idea of a managed data base environment in companies today is still the exception as opposed to the rule.

The programming staff tends to pride itself in terms of speed of development and technical elegance for their piece of the puzzle only, not the entire system. Requirements are roughly prepared and evolve as the program is developed. In the end, it looks nothing like what the user had hoped for.

Because writing program source code is typically a 1:1 endeavor, it tends to foster an individualistic attitude among programmers, and institutes a heterogeneous development environment. This leads to inconsistencies in workmanship and deliverables, thereby hindering quality. If you were to ask programmers if systems development is a science or an art form, without question they would respond as to the latter. This grants us insight into how programmers see themselves and their work.

Interestingly, programmers are not concerned with producing any documentation to maintain or modify their program should future occasion require it. It is generally believed it is cheaper and faster to simply rewrite the code as opposed to modifying the existing program, regardless of its level of complexity. Naturally, as the programmer moves on to another job in a different company, he walks away with the program logic safely lodged in his brain.

In terms of managing the development effort, companies covet Project Management certification, which is useful for such things as estimating and scheduling, but provides no insight into using effective methodologies for developing systems. Despite their best intentions, development projects still come in late and over budget. Consequently, companies shy away from massive development efforts, and are content building smaller things, thereby discouraging systems integration.

Come to think of it, the state of the I.T. industry is essentially no different than what it was when I began in this business back in the 1970’s. The technology may have changed, the problems in terms of development certainly haven’t. This includes how to specify information requirements, standardizing on systems theory, the role of documentation, managing information resources, etc. These problems are no different today than what they were back in the early 1970’s. Common sense is still uncommon.

Also published in The Huffington Post.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  EMBRACING COMPLEXITY – It’s a matter of how many things we can juggle at one time.

LAST TIME:  THE AMERICAN HEALTH CARE ACT; HERE WE GO AGAIN  – It looks like history is going to repeat itself.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Technology | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

THE FAST-FOOD KIOSKS ARE COMING, THE FAST-FOOD KIOSKS ARE COMING!

Posted by Tim Bryce on March 29, 2017

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Get ready for major changes at the fast-food franchises.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Back in the 1960’s, teens gravitated to drive-in restaurants with “carhops,” who delivered food to your car, sometimes on roller-skates. This all changed with the burger chains, yet young people still showed up for shakes, burgers and fries. When I lived in Chicago, there was a local McDonalds where you went to hang-out and be seen with your friends. It was one of the original McDonalds, complete with the big golden arches out front and the “number served” sign updated regularly. More than anything, it was a social venue which propelled the restaurant.

Such fast-food franchises have changed over the years and I’m not sure young people look upon it as the Baby Boomers did. Whereas such restaurants back then required a crew of people to operate it effectively, it is finally giving way to a hi-tech approach.

Robotic-like kiosks have been in the experimental stage since about 2006, but with the recent push to raise the minimum wage to $15/hour, the fast-food industry has accelerated its plans. Although many people embrace the idea of raising the minimum wage, industry executives realize there is limit to what the public will pay for service, hence the need to automate.

Today, virtually every major fast-food chain is either in the experimental stage or in the process of rolling out automation to speed up the processing of orders while minimizing the need for manual labor. This includes McDonalds, Burger King, Wendy’s, KFC, Taco Bell, Arby’s, Panera Bread, Starbucks, Pizza Hut and many more. Even my beloved white Castle, home of the original “sliders,” is embarking on such automation.

McDonalds recently reported they have implemented automation in nearly 2,600 of their restaurants around the world with hundreds more planned for 2017 in urban areas such as San Francisco, Boston, Chicago, D.C. and Seattle. Approximately 500 have already been implemented in Florida, New York, and Southern California.

Wendy’s has announced they will place kiosks in about 1,000 locations by the end of the year at a cost of about $15,000 for three kiosks, according to the Columbus Dispatch. This is cheap when compared to McDonalds where a single kiosk is said to cost between $50K-$60K. Even at this rate, a franchise can realize their return on investment in as little as two years based on the labor savings.

In China, a KFC restaurant is experimenting with a kiosk featuring facial recognition to predict a customer’s order. The company plans to roll out this technology to 5,000 stores throughout China. If successful, look for it to migrate to America.

Fast-food automation comes primarily in three forms:

1. Self-ordering – using touch screens, the customer can quickly make their selections, and tailor the product to their tastes. After watching a demonstration of this, it appears to be user friendly, but I still believe you can place an order faster with a human-being.

2. Order by App – using smart phones, you can quickly find a local franchise, and place an order ready for pickup.

3. Mobile payments – again, using a smart phone, you can pay by credit or debit card. McDonald’s claims “you can pay with your card at the kiosk or use mobile pay options like Apple or Android Pay. We’re even testing Google Hands Free payment options in the San Francisco Bay area.” I suspect PayPal is another option. The companies will still accept cash, which requires a human to process and make change, but the lion’s share of business will inevitably be conducted by smart phone.

There are two benefits related to fast-food automation, a reduction in labor costs and stimulating sales, particularly by young customers imbued with such technology. Older people may shy away from it.

The point is, through their protests, the “Fight for $15” activists are cutting off their noses to spite their faces. Even if they are successful, the pace of fast-food automation will accelerate, thereby reducing the number of employees. They may get their raise, but at a price of replacing workers with automation.

Like it or not, fast-food automation is here to stay and we will have to adapt to it. One thing is for sure, there won’t be any attractive “carhops.”

Also published in The Huffington Post.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  FUN AND GAMES AT THE AIRPORT – “Please report any suspicious behavior.” Are you kidding me?

LAST TIME:  UNDERSTANDING MILLENNIALS  – What we read in the news cannot all be true; can it?

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Food, Technology | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

TECHNOLOGY CLAIMS ANOTHER VICTIM

Posted by Tim Bryce on January 30, 2017

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Farewell to the “Greatest Show on Earth.”

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

It was recently announced the legendary Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus, “The Greatest Show
on Earth,” would be closing in May 2017. To fans of the circus, the news was devastating as it had become an institution after 145 years of operation. Like so many families, I took my children to see the circus at a young age. They were fascinated by the trained elephants, tigers, horses, and various other animal acts. The trapeze performers and high-wire acts were also a favorite.

My daughter particularly enjoyed “King Tusk,” a massive elephant, and the animal trainer Gunther Gebel-Williams. My son was more interested in the clowns and their shenanigans. The acts and names of the performers changed over the years, but the excitement of the circus seemed to go on unabated, until recently.

In a letter recently posted to the Ringling web site, Kenneth Feld, the Chairman and CEO of Feld Entertainment, the producer of the circus, broke the news to the public. Last year, the circus removed the elephant acts due, in large part, to animal rights activists who thought the animals were being mistreated. With the elephants gone, the circus started to diminish. To make matters worse, the attitudes of youth today are changing in terms of entertainment. They are now more imbued with the Internet and computer games than watching live performances, thus causing the death knell of the circus and other forms of live entertainment.

The average price for a ticket was affordable for families, but couldn’t sustain a traveling circus. Ticket prices were much less than Cirque du Soleil which are staged in fixed indoor venues, such as in Las Vegas, Orlando, and New York.

The passing of the circus into memory is another indicator of how technology affects the human spirit. It is sad to think that in the not too distant future, the only way we will be able to experience a circus will be through virtual reality glasses.

Another symptom of technology’s influence is in the area of shopping. Year after year, on-line shopping is said to be making great strides against shopping malls, particularly at holiday time. Unlike retailers in a mall, who have the overhead of renting space and paying for utilities and on-site personnel, on-line shopping has none of these concerns and, as such, can offer products more cheaply. The only time mall retailers have the advantage is when it is necessary to “touch and feel” a product, such as when selecting furniture, a major appliance, and automobiles. Even here though, on-line shopping is being strongly embraced by young people trained in the use of the Internet. If they do not like the product, they simply return it for a refund. Here again, we are losing the personal touch, our sense of customer service and basic salesmanship.

There are trade-offs for the extended use of technology; it may be useful to expedite a sales order or transaction, but at what price? The care of the customer? Or how about the decimation of an old institution such as the circus, where children of all ages sat and marveled at the abilities of man and beast? I, for one, will miss it greatly.

By the way, the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus will conclude its tour at the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Uniondale, NY, on May 21, 2017. Be sure to see it before it fades away into memory.

Also published with The Huffington Post.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2017 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  WHAT HAPPENED TO THE TRAVEL EXPENSE REPORT? – Are your employees abusing travel expenses?

LAST TIME:  FACING REALITY  – People plain and simply don’t want to know it.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

Posted in Life, Technology | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

MICROSOFT DUSTS OFF SPEECH RECOGNITION

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 21, 2016

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Company introduces new voice technology.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

On October 19th, 2016, Microsoft announced a new speech recognition technology that reportedly transcribes conversational speech as well as a human does, with an error rate of just 5.9%. As such, they claim this is an “Historic Achievement.” In theory, people will be able to issue commands to the computer and write text using voice commands to either your PC or smart phone.

Don’t get too excited just yet. This is actually an old technology. Back in 1996, with the advent of OS/2 Warp 4, speech navigation and VoiceType dictation was embedded in the operating system. As you may remember, OS/2 was IBM’s alternative to Windows on the PC. It was an excellent operating system, and I still have two computers running it flawlessly, but there was just one problem with it, IBM didn’t know how to market it and abdicated the desktop to Microsoft. OS/2 users, including yours truly, still recognize it as head and shoulders above anything Microsoft has produced, but that is another story.

Under OS/2, the user wore a voice activated microphone headset. From it, the user could navigate the computer using the commands found on action bars and pull down choices; for example: File, New, Open, Print, Save, Exit, Close, Find, Undo, Ok, Cancel, Maximize, Minimize, Help, etc. Frankly, it was quite efficient in operation and freed the user from simple tasks used with the keyboard and mouse. The second part was VoiceType dictation which allowed the user to dictate text for word processors, e-mails, and just about anything requiring text entries. Before you could use it though, they provided a routine which allowed you to train the computer. This was done by reading sections of literature from Mark Twain and took approximately one hour. The VoiceType dictation was effective but many people didn’t believe the computer could keep up with them and lost interest. As an aside, I suspect people no longer possess the skills needed to dictate a letter, something that has been lost in time as well as the “shorthand” language.

Another software product that acted in a similar manner was Dragon NaturallySpeaking by Nuance Communications in 1997 for use on the Windows platform. It is still actively marketed to this day. Other packages are also available.

Microsoft’s announcement is welcome news if it can process text faster and more accurately. Unfortunately, their announcement didn’t include a video or sample application to demonstrate their technology. The company even admits in their announcement, “the technology still has a long way to go before it can claim to master meaning (semantics) and contextual awareness.”

For more information on Microsoft’s speech recognition project, click HERE.

It’s interesting, OS/2 users always knew the operating system was way ahead of its time. Now we know precisely how many years ahead it was: 20.

Also published with News Talk Florida.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  HOW NOT TO COOK A THANKSGIVING DINNER – No, this is not about cooking recipes.

LAST TIME:  FOR THE LOVE OF COFFEE  – How much do you consume?

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Technology | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

FACEBOOK’S WORKPLACE

Posted by Tim Bryce on November 14, 2016

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– The latest twist on collaboration software.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Project collaboration has always been a concern to managers. It is essential to keep everyone rowing in the same direction. In the past, this was accomplished by conducting meetings, preferably before the work day begins. However, due to our fast paced world, it can be difficult to get the project team together. To overcome this problem, we have turned to technology.

Bulletin Board Systems (BBS) offered one of the first ways to allow birds of a feather to discuss topics of mutual interest and share files. These were eventually phased out as the Internet grew in stature. By itself, the Internet became the de facto standard for people in the workplace to communicate and exchange files.

Then along comes Lotus Notes in 1989 (now IBM Notes). Originally a mainframe based system that has migrated down to smart phones, it represents a collaboration tool offering e-mail, calendars, and business applications. Actually, it was quite a good product for its time. Although it is not entirely dead, it’s market share has diminished.

However, with the advent of smart phones, instant messaging, social media, and VoIP, something was needed that is more in tune with how people today use technology.

One such product is Microsoft’s SharePoint which was commercially released in 2003. The product is typically bundled with Microsoft Office and is primarily used for document management and storage. Between Office and SharePoint, thousands of companies use it for collaboration purposes. As such, it dominates the marketplace.

Launched in 2013, “Slack,” a collaboration tool used by communities, groups and teams offers chat rooms, direct messaging, and group telephone calls. It also integrates with a large number of third-party services.

Now along comes “Workplace” from Facebook which is based on the popular social media which millennials are more familiar. Introduced in a press release on October 10th, the product has been described as a “buffed-up chat room and team management software.” Unlike products like IBM Notes, “Workplace” is primarily a communications tool, not a project management package or office suite, at least not yet. It currently includes Instant Messaging, e-mail, VoIP, and file sharing. In a way, it’s not too dissimilar than what the BBS packages originally offered except for a slicker appearance, portability, and greater ease of use.

Facebook claims “Workplace” was originally developed internally within the company, and has been testing it with other businesses. According to their press release:

“We’ve brought the best of Facebook to the workplace — whether it’s basic infrastructure such as News Feed, or the ability to create and share in Groups or via chat, or useful features such as Live, Reactions, Search and Trending posts. This means you can chat with a colleague across the world in real time, host a virtual brainstorm in a Group, or follow along with your CEO’s presentation on Facebook Live.”

As for me, I question the necessity of keeping workers plugged into smart phones 24/7. I cannot help but believe this will become an interference which will hinder productivity.

Pricing is based on volume of users within a company, for example:

Free 3 month trial, followed by:
$3/person – Up to 1k monthly active users
$2/person – 1,001 – 10k monthly active users
$1/person – 10,001+ monthly active users

“Workplace” is also available free of charge for Non-Profits and Educational Institutions. Both High Schools and Colleges should investigate this further, as should businesses with people who are smart phone savvy.

Look for Facebook’s “Workplace” on the Internet at:
https://www.facebook.com/workplace
or
https://workplace.fb.com/

As for Microsoft’s SharePoint and Slack, they should be hearing footsteps.

Also published with News Talk Florida.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  FACEBOOK’S WORKPLACE – The latest twist on collaboration software.

LAST TIME:  A FONDNESS FOR GARAGES  – A glimpse inside the men’s clubhouse.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Technology | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

PROOF OF TECHNOLOGY ADDICTION

Posted by Tim Bryce on October 14, 2016

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Yes, it is a drug.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

When I learned of a new study warning of the addictive power of technology, I was pleased. I have been describing the adverse effects of technology since 2007, arriving at the conclusion in 2011 that Personal Technology is a drug with addictive powers.

Now it appears there is finally some scientific data to confirm my theory. The first is a report in the August 27th issue of the NY Post by Dr. Nicholas Kardaras, who contends technology raises dopamine, the neurotransmitter associated with rewards, as much as sex. He goes on to say, “Recent brain imaging research is showing that they affect the brain’s frontal cortex – which controls executive functioning, including impulse control – in exactly the same way that cocaine does.”

Kardaras is also the author of “Glow Kids: How Screen Addiction Is Hijacking Our Kids-and How to Break the Trance Hardcover,” released August 9, 2016 by St. Martin’s Press.

He goes on to cite Dr. Peter Whybrow, a director of neuroscience at the University of California, and Chinese researchers, claiming screens are like “electronic cocaine” or “digital heroin” to young children, and once they have reached the addictive levels their personalities change, such as becoming increasingly depressed, anxious and aggressive.

I have mentioned numerous studies over the years which support this thesis, but three in particular are worth noting:

* In 2005, a King’s College London University study by Dr. Glenn Wilson found workers distracted by technology suffer a greater loss of IQ than if they had smoked marijuana.

* In 2010, “The World Unplugged,” was a global media study led by the International Center for Media and the Public Agenda (ICMPA), University of Maryland. As part of their conclusions, the report commented on how students in the study handled the lack of media (meaning electronic devices):

“Going without media during ‘The World Unplugged’ study made students more cognizant of the presence of media – both media’s benefits and their limitations. And perhaps what students became most cognizant of was their absolute inability to direct their lives without media.

The depths of the ‘addiction’ that students reported prompted some to confess that they had learned that they needed to curb their media habits. Most students doubted they would have much success, but they acknowledged that their reliance on media was to some degree self-imposed AND actually inhibited their ability to manage their lives as fully as they hoped – to make proactive rather than reactive choices about work and play.”

Like anything, if used in moderation, technology holds no ill-effects. However, we have turned it into a 24/7 extension of our lives and can no longer imagine living without these devices. Because it offers instant gratification, it has become a new form of pacifier which we scream for when it is taken away from us.

* Also in 2010, the “Digital Pandemic” was authored by Mack R. Hicks, Ph.D. which provided a fascinating thesis on the effect of technology on our youth.

In all of these studies, the authors concluded technology exhibits the same type of addictive powers as chemical dependency or, at the very least, gambling which also does not require drugs in the usual sense. Actually, the parallel between technology and gambling addiction is quite remarkable, and can be just as devastating. However, it appears Dr. Kardaras’ paper and book finally provides the hard data needed to prove the legitimacy of technology addiction.

In terms of technology, perhaps the biggest difference between the 20th century and the 21st is how technology has changed the pace of our lives. We now expect to communicate with anyone on the planet in seconds, not days. We expect information at our fingertips. We expect to be up and walking shortly after a hip or knee replacement. Basically, we take a lot for granted.

Let me leave you with one last thought; Life doesn’t emulate art, it emulates technology. Think about it, are we becoming more robotic in our thinking? Do we rely on technology to accommodate the thinking processes of the brain? If so, then researchers like Dr. Kardaras are absolutely correct.

“As the use of technology increases, social skills decrease.” – Bryce’s Law

Also published with News Talk Florida.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Also read Tim’s columns in the THE HUFFINGTON POST

NEXT UP:  TRYING TO DO WHAT IS RIGHT – Doing “right” requires perseverance and an intolerance for what is “wrong.”

LAST TIME:  PROACTIVE VERSUS REACTIVE MANAGEMENT  – We have plenty of time to do things wrong.

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

 

Posted in Technology | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

MICROSOFT: WHERE DO I SEND THE BILL?

Posted by Tim Bryce on August 8, 2016

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Losing time as a result of Microsoft updates.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Microsoft never fails to surprise me in terms of how it can waste my time. Recently I was working on my office machine, which includes Windows 7 Home Premium. I realize it is not their latest offering, but I have learned over the years to never rush into a Microsoft upgrade. Nonetheless, all was going well until Google Chrome for some reason became unresponsive. Having experienced such lockups in the past, I decided to reboot the computer and let it clear the anomalies. I figured it would be just a couple of minutes out of my day, but boy was I wrong.

Before I could power off, Microsoft took charge of my machine, displaying a message:

“Please do not power off or unplug your machine.
Installing X of 17..”

I had no idea what the updates were, but I suspect it was to download Windows 10 on to my machine. Of the 17 updates, #14 seemed to take the longest for some reason. After much waiting, I finally received the message:

“Shutting down…” RESTART

I thought, “Finally, I can get back to work,” but such was not to be. As the machine started I received the following message:

“Configuring Windows update
X% complete.
Do not turn off your computer.”

This too took a long time to complete. Following this, it said:

“Cleaning up…”

And at long last I was taken to my desktop where I could continue working. Elapsed time for this update: approximately one hour.

Now I don’t know about you, but I am not paid to be a Microsoft technician. Although I’m not too bad when it comes to computer problems, I prefer to tend to my own work. This caused me to become irritated with the boys and girls from Redmond as I was under a deadline to complete an article. Actually, I was ready to blow my stack, and, No, I do not mean the type used in programming.

For some reason, Microsoft thinks nothing of wasting the time of their customers. In a way, they remind me of dentists and doctors who lack regard for patients in their waiting rooms.

It would have been nice if Windows told me what the update was about and if now was a good time to apply it or schedule it for a later time, such as late at night, but this did not occur.

I am therefore preparing a bill for Microsoft for my time lost during the business day. I’m not asking for a lot, but a reasonable amount for time lost. Most likely, they will not pay it, at which time I’ll see them in Small Claims Court.

If enough people did this, perhaps we wouldn’t get such sloppy products from them.

Also published with News Talk Florida.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  BOOK REVIEW: “CRISIS OF CHARACTER” – How Hillary Clinton is perceived by the Secret Service.

LAST TIME:  CAN YOU SPEAK “DOG”?  – Who is better trained, the pet or the master?

Listen to Tim on News Talk Florida (WWBA 820 AM), WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Technology | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

OFFICE DEPOT REWARDS

Posted by Tim Bryce on June 24, 2016

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Another technology innovation gone awry.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

For years, I have been going to the nearby Office Depot store to purchase basic office supplies, mostly paper and computer printer cartridges. As many of you know, they have a recycle program for the cartridges which earns the customer cash rewards. For several years, I received reward coupons through the mail for use at the store. Recently though, this all came to an unexpected halt.

Last week I received a new coupon from the company. Frankly, I didn’t read it carefully, but I did observe that “You’ve earned $20.00,” so I figured everything was okay and I took it with me for my next purchase. This is where I made my mistake.

When I presented the coupon to the cashier, I was told I couldn’t use the document. She then showed me that it wasn’t a coupon at all, and to get my coupon, I was instructed to login to officedepot.com/rewards and register myself. After that, I could either print a coupon or have it sent to my smart phone, which I do not have (as an aside, people laugh at my tiny cell phone, but it suits my needs).

Basically, the company decided to save money by not mailing any more coupons and let the customer bear the expense. This has become rather commonplace these days, such as airline tickets, bank statements, newsletters, and now coupon generation. However, I suspect there is more to it than this. For example, people such as myself who do not want the hassle of logging in to obtain a coupon and, by not doing so, the company will save considerable money, not just from not printing and mailing coupons, but by people forfeiting their rewards. When I pointed this out to the cashier, she admitted I was probably right.

It is these little, seemingly innocent, technology foibles that get under my skin. No, I will not be returning to my local Office Depot store anytime soon. If they want me to go on-line, I will do so but will visit other web sites where I can find the same products at less expense. The only reason I stayed with Office Depot was because it was nearby and I could easily drop in to buy supplies. However, whenever I go in, it is like a cavernous barn with few customers inside. Perhaps their new approach to their rewards program will finally force them to shut their doors.

When it comes to shopping, I get the uneasy feeling companies want to only process on-line orders and close their stores. This might be good news for companies like UPS and FedEx, but what about the people who want to “touch and feel” a product before deciding to purchase it?

Oh, how I miss the twentieth century.

Also published with News Talk Florida.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  PROMOTING MORALITY – Some suggestions.

LAST TIME:  THE MAIN EVENT: THE TRUMP/CLINTON DEBATES  – Hold on to your seats, you won’t want to miss them.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific); and WWBA-AM (News Talk Florida 820). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Technology | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

NO, I DO NOT WANT WINDOWS 10

Posted by Tim Bryce on June 20, 2016

BRYCE ON TECHNOLOGY

– Why do some look better than others?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

For the last few months I have been bombarded with messages from Microsoft asking, no begging me, to upgrade to Windows 10, the latest version of their operating system. Frankly, I am not interested. I am staying with Windows 7, both at home and at the office, primarily because we still have a couple of DOS based programs we regularly use and there is no effective support for them on Windows 10 (or Windows 8 for that matter).

Day after day, we see little pop-up boxes asking us to upgrade which we regularly ignore. I learned a long time ago to never use anything new from Microsoft as it is way too buggy and not properly tested. Microsoft is one of those techie companies who relies on its customers to test their products. This is like asking the customers of an automotive company to test their products. Er, ah, no thanks. Frankly, I do not believe Microsoft knows how to competently test their products themselves. This is why I have never thought of MS as “state of the art.”

The company was so persistent for me to upgrade to Windows 10 (or is it downgrade?), that they even installed it on my home computer over night. In the morning, I awoke to a new screen welcoming me to Windows 10. I began to panic as I knew I didn’t want it, yet they had the audacity to install it without my permission. Fortunately, as I started to go through the first few steps of using it, they asked me if I accepted the terms and conditions for using the product, for which I pressed the DECLINE button. I then heard my computer groan, or perhaps it was Bill Gates himself, as it removed Windows 10 and returned me to Windows 7. Wow, that was a close one.

I have some friends who, not knowing any better, accidentally accepted the terms and conditions, and now appear to be stuck with Windows 10 which they simply abhor.

Fortunately, after sniffing around on the Internet, I happened to find a way to return your computer back to Windows 7 and 8, and, No, it wasn’t authored by Microsoft. Evidently you have one month to reverse the process. After that, you are stuck with Windows 10. Click HERE. There is also a video on YouTube to walk you through the process.

Frankly, it is very disconcerting Microsoft pushes this upgrade down the throat of customers who do not want it. It’s intrusive and I wonder how legal it is to do so. You can nudge all you want, just do not push.

Also published with News Talk Florida.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  THE MAIN EVENT: THE TRUMP/CLINTON DEBATES – Hold on to your seats, you won’t want to miss them.

LAST TIME:  SIGNATURES  – Why do some look better than others?

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; KIT-AM (1280) in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific); and WWBA-AM (News Talk Florida 820). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Computers, Technology | Tagged: , , , , , | 6 Comments »

 
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