THE BRYCE IS RIGHT!

Software for the finest computer – The Mind

Archive for the ‘Terrorism’ Category

9-11 REMEMBERED

Posted by Tim Bryce on September 11, 2015

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Today’s high school seniors were just four at the time.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

There have been a handful of epochal events over the years where someone might ask, “Where were you when this or that happened?” For example, Pearl Harbor, the JFK assassination, the Beatles on Ed Sullivan, Neal Armstrong setting foot on the moon, and the Challenger disaster. Of course, the most recent event to Americans was the 9-11 terrorist attack in 2001. As for me, I was in my office early on that Tuesday morning and my cleaning crew was in taking care of the office. In the reception area, I had a television turned on and tuned to the local news. As I was typing on my computer, one of the cleaning crew came into my office very excited and said, “Tim, come out here and look at this; they’ve attacked the Twin Towers in New York.” I rushed out and watched the north tower burning and listened to newscasters hustling to get on top of the story. Then, after a few minutes, a second plane crashed into the south tower. We couldn’t believe our eyes. This was compounded later by air attacks on the Pentagon in Washington, DC, and another plane crashing in western Pennsylvania.

President Bush was visiting an elementary school just south of us in Sarasota where a news crew captured the president’s reaction to news of the disaster. The visit was cut short and he left with a brief statement informing the people present what had occurred and, if memory serves me right, he asked for a moment of silent prayer. This disaster would ultimately define the president’s tenure of office.

Conspiracy theorists would later claim the disaster was an “inside job” caused by the administration. I have listened to these stories time and again, and cannot find any validity in them. Nonetheless, on that day, 9-11, 2,996 people perished including the 19 terrorists involved, the greatest single day loss in our history, easily outdistancing Pearl Harbor where 2,403 Americans were killed and 1,178 others wounded. In the New York disaster, the city lost 343 firefighters and paramedics, and 60 law enforcement personnel. Companies in the North Tower lost hundreds of employees each. It was truly a sad day.

It has now been 14 years since the attack, and the disaster is already fading from the memories of our young people. Consider this, today’s high school seniors were but four years old at the time and, as such, have no real recollection of the disaster. I may understand them not remembering Pearl Harbor, an event which occurred over 70 years ago, but they should be reminded of the significance of 9-11 and its effect on the 21st century.

Although America was mildly aware of Middle East terrorists before, this disaster brought it home to the nation and defined our foreign policy for years to come. Today, just about everyone is familiar with the names of al-Qaeda, Muslim Brotherhood, and ISIS. New words have entered our vocabulary, such as burka, Jihad (Holy war), Fatwas (binding religious edicts), Mosque (Islamic place of worship), suicide bombers, IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devices), caliphate (Islamic government) and are familiar with the sects in the area, Sunnis, Shites, and Kurds. Most Americans now know where Iraq, Iran, Yemen, UAE, Afghanistan, and Pakistan are, and we’ve noticed Muslims immigrating to countries, including the United States, and insisting on Sharia Law. Prior to 9-11, this was all relatively unknown. Now it is a part of our daily lives.

The threat of a terrorist attack is still a viable concern. We should ever be vigilant for the next attack. As Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke Jr. observed, “And that’s why it’s just going to get worse. You’re going to see more attacks, where they target two different sites and expand across the nation in different states. I think we have to find a role for U.S. citizens in this as well but until we get a strategy, that’s not going to happen.”

9-11 is an important symbol, not just for remembering the victims of 2001, but a warning for our future. This is why the lessons of 9-11 should be repeated to school children. The very least schools could do is ask the students to stand and have a moment of silence for the victims. 9-11 may be in our past, but what is in store for us in the future?

For a synopsis of 9-11, see:
http://www.history.com/topics/9-11-attacks

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  THE THREE TENETS OF MANAGEMENT – Is there any real management going on anymore?

LAST TIME:  MAD AS HELL  – “And I’m not going to take it anymore.”

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Life, Terrorism | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

A PLEDGE TO DENOUNCE TERRORISM

Posted by Tim Bryce on February 4, 2015

BRYCE ON TERRORISM

– Who is ready to sign the pledge? I know I am.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest recently announced the Obama administration will host a Summit on Countering Violent Extremism on February 18th. The summit will highlight domestic and international efforts to prevent violent extremist activities and terrorism. This will likely be used to discuss cooperation between countries regarding sharing intelligence and responsive action. However, it will probably not deal with the matter of detecting terrorist sympathies or creating a movement to quell such activity.

On January 11th, the French held their Solidarity Rally in Paris to protest the bloody attack of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo by Islamic extremists. The rally was a symbolic gesture which highlighted the growing disgust and anger by the people of the world regarding terrorism. Smaller rallies were held elsewhere, including Germany where Muslims rallied to show solidarity with Paris. To capitalize on this sentiment, perhaps we can do more.

Up to now, the Muslim community has been reluctant to criticize Islamic terrorism, partly due to fear and partly due to sharing the sentiments of the extremists. I have always believed the Muslim problem is a Muslim problem, meaning it is ultimately up to the Islamic faithful to get their extremists under control. This can begin by publicly denouncing terrorism as in the German rally. Following Paris, Ahmed Aboutaleb, the Muslim mayor of Rotterdam, the Netherlands, recently raised eyebrows in an interview where he was quoted as saying to Dutch Muslims, “If you can’t find your place in the Netherlands, in the way we want to build a society together, leave.”

Actually we need more calls to refute terrorism, be it from Muslims, Christians, Jews, or whatever your faith happens to be, or even if you do not believe. As a Christian, I readily denounce any terrorist activity related to my faith, as should Muslims, Jews, etc. Frankly, I have had enough and it’s time to soundly denounce such behavior. To this end, imagine if Americans were all asked to sign a pledge publicly denouncing terrorism. Such public condemnation can only have positive effects. However, if people refused to sign it, they would be admitting their sympathies to terrorists and, as the Rotterdam Mayor said, they should just “leave.” Either way, this would be a powerful way to condemn terrorism and detect those with sympathies for extremists.

The pledge would be something like this:
“As a U.S. citizen or undocumented alien residing in the United States, I hereby freely and publicly denounce and condemn all violence and terrorism resulting from extremist activity, particularly from my own Religious Faith (duly noted). I further pledge to protect and defend the United States by reporting to the proper authorities, such as local law enforcement officials, or the Department of Homeland Security:

* Any suspicious behavior related to violence or terrorism.
* Any activities pertaining to recruiting, radicalizing, or inspiring others to commit acts of violence. This includes meetings, literature, broadcasting, and information on the Internet.”

I see this as something administered by the Department of Homeland Security. For those who believe the government already knows too much about us, there would essentially be nothing new here other than a new form of pledge of allegiance.

This is not so much a legal referendum, but a social movement to raise the consciousness of the public to help eradicate terrorism. Certainly some people will make this pledge under false pretenses, just as terrorist sympathizers undoubtedly marched in the Paris rally to study the feelings of the people, but we would have their name for the record.

Such a public declaration would put people on the spot and force them to chose their allegiance. A refutation of terrorism can only have beneficial effects. It shapes public opinion, improves intelligence through tips, keeps control in the hands of trained counter terrorist experts, and identifies those who do not want to properly adapt to American culture and rule of law. This all ultimately depends on the American public and if they are sincerely tired of extremist behavior.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:  timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2015 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  BRYCETITIZED – When you want to divert from logic for some inexplicable reason.

LAST TIME:  FEBRUARY: BUSY HOLIDAY MONTH  – For a short month, we stay rather busy.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Politics, Terrorism | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

THE WAR ON TERROR

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 19, 2010

In the wake of the 9-11 disaster, I remember driving around with my son who was, at the time, still in middle school. I wanted to engage him in conversation to get him to think about what had just happened and what it meant to the United States. It was clear to me a new era of warfare had been born as a result of the tragedy, a type of warfare Americans still have trouble comprehending. As a nation, our perception of warfare is still of land, sea and air engagements a la the 20th century; e.g., the two world wars, Korea and Viet Nam. We have become rather proficient in traditional military maneuvers as demonstrated by how we brushed aside the Iraqi army, not just once, but twice.

The War on Terror though is unlike any other war we have fought. It has little to do with soldier versus soldier in the traditional sense. Our enemies know they would easily be annihilated in such a confrontation and, instead, have chosen to form a shadow army to fight behind the scenes by not only sniping at Americans but also trying to undermine their very existence. Some would say their actions are those of a coward. Maybe so, then again what alternative do they have as they are without the means to achieve a military victory.

More than anything, the War on Terror is an intelligence war. Whereas our enemies can easily find out what they need to know through the general media and Internet, our intelligence people need to dig deeper and harder to learn what our opposition is doing. This means the CIA is really our front-line, an often maligned agency of our government who a lot of people would like to see dismantled. Nothing could be more foolish. Prior to World War II, the United States had no organized intelligence body. It wasn’t until after we were bombed at Pearl Harbor and found ourselves embroiled in a world war that we finally determined the need for such an agency, hence the birth of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) in 1942, the forerunner of the CIA. Perhaps if we had an effective intelligence agency before then we could have averted the catastrophe that befell us on December 7th, 1941, but such is hindsight.

Our enemies in the War on Terror are funded by such things as drugs, oil, and religious zealots. Simple economics can be just as powerful a weapon as anything we have in our military arsenal. By curbing drug traffic, you are fighting the War on Terror. By curbing our dependence on foreign oil and developing our internal energy resources, you are fighting the War on Terror. By disseminating positive information about the United States overseas, be it factual or propaganda, you are fighting the War on Terror. And the development of intelligence resources is, of course, a prerequisite for fighting the War on Terror.

Such a war doesn’t necessarily produce battle victories or body counts, which is how we have traditionally measured military success. These are tangible elements. Instead, the War on Terror deals primarily in intangibles. As such, it cannot be fought based on public opinion polls as the American public is not aware of how the war is being waged. This also means the public shouldn’t expect any formal surrender ceremonies on battleships. The War on Terror is an ongoing conflict we will be embroiled in throughout our lifetimes. It’s not that it is a no-win contest, it is simply a recognition that terrorism is the only form of warfare our enemies can engage in.

The next question should be rather obvious; how can each citizen help? Actually, we are already a part of it, whether we like it or not, as we are pawns in developing the mindshare of America. We need to fight drugs, thereby eliminating the cash flow to our enemies; we need to make our communities safe from crime, thereby causing funds to be channeled where they are really needed; we need to develop our moral character, thereby setting an example for the world to emulate, and; we need to make sure our government is working properly and operating under the right set of priorities. In other words, we need to practice basic citizenship again. We should not be so foolish as to believe our actions have no consequence, they do; we are all foot soldiers in the War on Terror whether we realize it or not. During World War II, Americans were all expected to pitch in and do their part. Now it is our turn, our time.

Remember this, one of the main reasons why the British lost in our Revolutionary War is not because they didn’t have a superior army (they did), but because they couldn’t adapt to a different form of warfare. Since we are all in this War of Terror together, we must all adapt or perish.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is the Managing Director of M. Bryce & Associates (MBA) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
http://www.phmainstreet.com/timbryce.htm

Copyright © 2010 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Posted in Politics, Terrorism | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: