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Posts Tagged ‘IT’S BACK TO WORK WE GO’

HEIGH HO, HEIGH HO, IT’S BACK TO WORK WE GO

Posted by Tim Bryce on January 3, 2019

BRYCE ON THE NEW YEAR

– Now is the time for management to stimulate the work force.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Okay, the holidays are over, our friends and relatives should have returned home, the retailers had their way with us, we’re back in debt, the holiday decorations should have been stored away for another year, and a sense of normalcy should be returning. The holidays strangely reminds me of the Bataan Death March where we are forced to go through a perilous ordeal against our will. We’re worn out by the celebrations, large or small, gained weight, and live in a constant state of fear over our January credit card statements. Whereas the Death March was a one time event, the holidays come every year and we voluntarily subject ourselves to this torture over and over again.

Nonetheless, it’s a new year, and time to go back to work. January is when we reset the statistics, brace for a new year, and try to prove ourselves once again.

Some people have trouble getting back into the swing of work after the holidays; they’ve probably slept too much, partied too much, and ate way too much, which explains the five-to-eight pounds they’ve put on. This is why dieting and temperance are among the top New Year’s resolutions. Regardless, they are having trouble focusing on their work.

People tend to believe December is the worst month for productivity. Hardly. In addition to general retail, December is when companies try to finish spending the money in their corporate budgets thereby initiating a flurry of activity. Companies would much rather spend money on technology, office furniture, construction, or their employees as opposed to giving it to the government. Instead, January is more difficult as managers have to encourage lethargic employees back to work. The cold weather doesn’t help either.

Now is the time for some imaginative management techniques to motivate the work force. Basically, I’m suggesting some changes to the corporate culture. Physically, you might want to consider a new coat of paint, changes in lighting, some aromatic plants or flowers, new uniforms, new screen savers, a cleanup of office files and furniture, some changes in music, or perhaps something different to eat in the corporate cafeteria. In other words, consider changes affecting the five senses of the workers. It doesn’t have to be lavish either, just something subtle the employees will notice and appreciate.

You may also want to rethink meetings, including when they are conducted, location, and format. For example, instead of a boardroom setup, how about a u-shaped set of tables allowing the manager to easily move about? A change of dress code may also be wise; if you’ve been too lax and sloppy, perhaps it is time to become a little more formal. If you’ve been too formal, perhaps it is time to loosen things up. Believe me, employees notice and respond.

It shouldn’t be the manager’s objective to make radical changes in work habits. Such changes will be resisted regardless of the time of year. Instead, small changes will be noticed by employees who will see them in a positive light, that management appreciates them and is willing to invest in them. “Hmm…, a New Year, some new changes… I like it.”

Your objective is to demonstrate you are investing in your people, and not taking them for granted. Whatever the twist may be, January is the time for management to try it. In all likelihood, it will capture the attention of the work force and help reinvigorate them for the new year.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2019 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

 

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Posted in Business, Management | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

HI-HO, HI-HO, IT’S BACK TO WORK WE GO – PART II

Posted by Tim Bryce on January 4, 2016

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

– Some New Year resolutions for the office.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

A couple of years ago I wrote a column titled, “Hi Ho, Hi Ho, It’s Back to Work We Go” (Jan 06, 2014), whereby I gave some advice to managers regarding the implementation of changes in the office to make employees more productive. Basically, I discussed how some simple modifications in the office’s physical appearance can have a positive effect on the corporate culture. Here, I would like to continue by describing some attitudinal changes by office workers, including both management and the work force.

First, middle management should learn to manage more and supervise less (e.g., micromanagement). This means they should treat workers like professionals, empower them to perform projects and tasks on their own, and try to stay out of their way. The only time the manager should become involved is when a problem arises that cannot be solved by the workers, assigning new projects or tasks to be performed, and holding workers accountable for their actions. To make this effective, a routine reporting system must be devised to keep management appraised of the status of projects and activities (e.g., a project management system). This, of course means a Theory Y form of management where employees are managed from the “bottom-up” as opposed to autocratic rule (“top-down”). Such an approach will cause workers to become more resourceful, innovative, and develop a sense of “ownership” over their work products, thereby promoting corporate loyalty.

Management should also endeavor to manage the workplace and corporate culture in such a way as to promote a professional atmosphere, high ethics, promote teamwork and courteous behavior, thereby causing workers to become more disciplined and develop a sense of pride in workmanship.

Two other ideas come to mind; first, making sure the staff understands the history of the business and their chosen craft, and; second, teach employees to “think big” by having them become cognizant of the big picture of the business. For example, if they are charged with a small part of a system, have them learn about the entire system so they come to understand how their role affects others. This will encourage them to think beyond their scope of work and create synergism among the workers. Both middle management and workers should also be aware of the amount of money required to operate their section of the business. This means they should participate in the process of developing a budget. By doing so, it makes them conscious of profit and loss, which helps to focus their priorities and incentives.

Workers also need to adjust their attitude. Instead, of watching the clock, they should dedicate themselves to learning more about the work products they are charged with producing. In other words, they need to be equally cognizant of quality as well as speed in delivery. They should also strive to project a professional image by being courteous, neat in appearance, a team player, and strive to excel the ethical standards of the business. Their motto should be, “What I do not know, I will not fabricate an excuse but endeavor to learn the answer; what I do know, I will share with others.”

Senior workers should mentor young workers in the proper procedures for developing and delivering work products, and be smart enough to listen to the younger workers who may have learned a new trick or two particularly in the area of technology.

Conversely, younger workers should listen to their elders and challenge the status quo to constantly seek new and improved ways for performing tasks. Even if they finished school with honors, they should constantly strive to improve their work related skills, this includes learning the corporate history and their craft. After all, there is no need to reinvent the wheel or commit the mistakes of their predecessors.

A little attitude adjustment and some resolutions for the new year can work wonders. As I mentioned in my other column, January is the time for management to implement such innovations. Such changes should capture the attention of the work force and help reinvigorate them for the year.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2016 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT MR. TRUMP? – Not as much as you think.

LAST TIME:  2015 YEAR-END WRAP-UP  – My most popular columns this year.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern); WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Business, Management | Tagged: , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

HI HO, HI HO, IT’S BACK TO WORK WE GO

Posted by Tim Bryce on January 6, 2014

BRYCE ON MANAGEMENT

– Now is the time for management to stimulate the work force.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Okay, the holidays are over, our friends and relatives should have returned home, the retailers had their way with us, we’re back in debt, the holiday decorations should have been stored away for another year, and a sense of normalcy should be returning. It’s a new year, and time to go back to work. January is when we reset the statistics, brace for a new year, and try to prove ourselves once again.

Some people have trouble getting back into the swing of work after the holidays; they’ve probably slept too much, partied too much, and ate way too much, which explains the five-to-eight pounds they’ve put on. This is why dieting and temperance are among the top New Year’s resolutions. Regardless, they are having trouble focusing on their work.

People tend to believe December is the worst month for productivity. Hardly. In addition to general retail, December is when companies try to finish spending the money in their corporate budgets thereby initiating a flurry of activity. Companies would much rather spend money on technology, office furniture, construction, or their employees as opposed to giving it to the government. Instead, January is more difficult as managers have to encourage lethargic employees back to work. The cold weather doesn’t help either.

Now is the time for some imaginative management techniques to motivate the work force. Basically, I’m suggesting some changes to the corporate culture. Physically, you might want to consider a new coat of paint, changes in lighting, some aromatic plants or flowers, new uniforms, new screen savers, a cleanup of office files and furniture, some changes in music, or perhaps something different to eat in the corporate cafeteria. In other words, consider changes affecting the five senses of the workers. It doesn’t have to be lavish either, just something subtle the employees will notice and appreciate.

You may also want to rethink meetings, including when they are conducted, location, and format. For example, instead of a boardroom setup, how about a u-shaped set of tables allowing the manager to easily move about? A change of dress code may also be wise; if you’ve been too lax and sloppy, perhaps it is time to become a little more formal. If you’ve been too formal, perhaps it is time to loosen things up. Believe me, employees notice and respond.

It shouldn’t be the manager’s objective to make radical changes in work habits. Such changes will be resisted regardless of the time of year. Instead, small changes will be noticed by employees who will see them in a positive light, that management appreciates them and is willing to invest in them. “Hmm…, a New Year, some new changes… I like it.”

Your objective is to demonstrate you are investing in your people, and not taking them for granted. Whatever the twist may be, January is the time for management to try it. In all likelihood, it will capture the attention of the work force and help reinvigorate them for the new year.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2014 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  WHAT’S IN A JOB TITLE? – Evidently a lot.

LAST TIME:  2013 YEAR-END WRAP-UP – My most popular columns this year.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News” with hosts Dave Ettl & Lance Tormey (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Posted in Business, Management | Tagged: , , , , , , | 6 Comments »