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Posts Tagged ‘THINGS WE NEVER THROW AWAY’

THE MILLENNIALS

Posted by Tim Bryce on July 1, 2013

BRYCE ON GENERATION Y

– Can they really save America?

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

As you grow older you begin to notice small changes in your life, such as how advertisers no longer market to your age group, or how the entertainment field no longer caters to you. Consequently, you begin to find it difficult to find anything of interest on television or at the movies. Instead, you begin to read more, watch the news and perhaps some reruns before calling it a night. Your sense of fashion and style changes, as does your purchasing decisions. It finally becomes crystal clear that everything is being geared to a younger generation, not yours. In other words, you feel the world passing you by, which I can only presume to be a natural phenomenon.

If you haven’t already noticed, corporate marketing efforts are taking aim at the Millennials, those between the ages of early 20’s to 30. This group, which is also known as “Generation Y”, has surpassed the Baby Boomers and “Generation X” (early 30’s to 40’s), for marketing attention. The over 40 crowd is considered “has beens” and businesses, the media and politicians are gearing up for the Millennials instead. The big question though is, how will they respond?

Like every generation, the Millennials exhibit unbridled enthusiasm in the work place. There are lots of genuinely creative and hard working people in this group. My concern for them is threefold though: First, they are notoriously low informed in terms of current events. Thanks to technology, they may know the latest fads, fashions, music, and sports, but most do not stay abreast of current events. Second, there appears to be no sense of history, be it world, national, local, or professional. Third, parenting and management skills have deteriorated over the years. “Helicopter parents” either kept their offspring on a short leash or abdicated their parental responsibilities altogether thereby offering no direction. In business, the trend is towards micromanagement which frustrates employee motivation, and arrests growth.

These three elements are reflected in the Millenials decision making capabilities. If you are poorly informed and have no sense of history, you are likely to waste considerable time reinventing the wheel. Further, if you do not understand the world around you, in all likelihood you will waste considerable time working on the wrong things. There is also an inclination to concentrate on quick and dirty solutions as opposed to producing quality work products. Energy and zeal is one thing, making smart decisions is something else.

Consequently, I am becoming very much concerned with the Millennials assuming their role in society. Instead, we are grooming a generation of robots who will be afraid to accept responsibility, and do as they are instructed, be it from their managers or the media. I fear their ambition and entrepreneurial spirit has been broken and they will work harder, but not necessarily smarter.

Consider this about the Millennials:

*  Their sense of history only goes as far back as President George W. Bush (with a twinkling of Clinton thrown in). This means they have no real grasp of the Cold War, Viet Nam, or the first Iraq war. Some do not even have a recollection of 9-11.

* Education is now more about testing and lockdowns as opposed to teaching. They have been programmed to test, not to learn.

* They cannot imagine life without their smart phones and have developed a serious addiction to technology. Without it, they are disconnected from society.

* Most have huge college debts, and many still live at home with their parents.

This sounds more like we are breeding a generation of sheep as opposed to shepherds. Then again, maybe this is precisely what business, the media and politicians are hoping for, a generation of people who can be easily manipulated; people who will purchase goods on demand, or vote for someone or something without question. Sounds kind of scary to me. I guess I’ll just stick to my reading and reruns.

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  AMERICAN HISTORY 101 – “We are raising a generation that is historically illiterate”

LAST TIME:  THINGS WE NEVER THROW AWAY – Not the important stuff, the inconsequential items.

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Lance Tormey & Mike Bastinelli (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

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Posted in Life, Social Issues | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »

THINGS WE NEVER THROW AWAY

Posted by Tim Bryce on June 28, 2013

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Not the important stuff, the inconsequential items.

(Click for AUDIO VERSION)
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

It’s interesting the types of objects we collect and never seem to throw away. I’m not talking about sentimental things like photographs, just the general brik a brak we are more inclined to keep instead of discarding. With me, its cigar boxes and coffee cans. I’ve used them to store everything from nails and other hardware, to tickets, baseball cards, and other trinkets. I think of them as handy storage units and, as such, hate to throw them away, even if I have an ample supply of them. Most of the time I’ll ask friends and colleagues if they want them, but most decline. Inevitably, it is with deep regret that I finally decide to throw them in the garbage. What a waste.

There are other miscellaneous items we do not like to dispose of:

Shipping boxes are typically collected with the thought they can be used to mail something to a family member or friend. They are particularly handy for birthdays and the Christmas holidays, but we tend to collect too many of them. I’ve also seen boxes that have been reused many times over the years. I think some were made back in the 60’s.

Towels and cloths have a long life expectancy. Even after we have stopped using them in the bathroom they end up in a rag bag for outdoor use, such as washing cars. Have you noticed the rag bag only gets bigger, never smaller?

Just about every household has some sort of container to collect spare change. We used an old wine jug for years to collect spare change. When we finally “cashed out,” I was amazed how much we had collected. It was easily over $100. I have seen several households though where they are never emptied and sent to the bank. I don’t think a lot of people want to waste their time with pennies, nickels, and dimes.

A lot of homes seem to collect an inordinate amount of refrigerator magnets, some with such an extensive array of pictures it is difficult to see the refrigerator behind them. Every now and then you should clean those out.

Records, CD’s, DVD’s, and VHS tapes abound in a lot of homes. I still have quite an impressive collection of 33 LP’s from my youth, as well as 45’s. Fortunately, I still have a decent turntable and will occasionally play an “oldie.” However, I know a lot of people who have maintained their record collections but have nothing to play them on. I also do not use CD’s much anymore. My kids collected a mountain of them which were quickly abandoned when the iPod was introduced. I am reluctant to dispose of them as I realize it was a substantial investment.

There are people who have collected magazines over the years, even though this is something that has essentially evaporated over time. I have some copies of “LIFE” from the 60’s featuring the space race and other newsworthy events from that decade. I also have some “TV Guides” from back then as well. People also like to keep their old “Playboys,” which I’m told are now worth a lot of money. The one magazine though that most people are hesitant to dispose of is “National Geographic.” I know of dozens of homes with extensive “NATGEO” collections, some weighing so much they bend the shelves they sit upon. My parents kept their copies for years until I finally helped clean them out. Your first inclination is to give them to the local library. If you want to see horror in the eyes of someone, bring your copies of “NATGEO” to your librarian. They will only throw them away.

People also like to keep the cheap plastic pots that plants come in. I’m not sure why. They are cleaned out, dutifully stacked, and tucked away in a garage or shed where they do nothing more than take up space and collect dust. I guess this is one of those “You never know…” type of items.

Parents like to keep old board games their offspring played with during their youth. I think it’s a law that every household must have a copy of “Monopoly” tucked away in a closet somewhere. My mom also has an old “Parcheesi” set, as well as checkers and chess which nobody has used in several decades, and an old Erector Set. By the way, does anybody remember Chinese Checkers?

There are lots of other items people collect, such as old cameras, spices in the kitchen, even paper sales receipts for insignificant items.

I’m sure there are many more items I’m overlooking but these are the things that come to mind. Some we collect due to sentimental value or we perceive them as investments, others we believe will have some practical use sometime in the future. The reality though is that most of it just belongs in the garbage.

With that said, does anyone need a coffee can or cigar box?

Keep the Faith!

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

NEXT UP:  THE MILLENNIALS – Can they really save America?

LAST TIME:  SNAPPED – That’s it; enough is enough; leave me alone!

Listen to Tim on WJTN-AM (News Talk 1240) “The Town Square” with host John Siggins (Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30-3:00pm Eastern), KGAB-AM 650 “The Morning Zone” with host Dave Chaffin (weekdays, 6:00-10:00am Mountain), and KIT-AM 1280 in Yakima, Washington “The Morning News with Dave and Lance” with hosts Lance Tormey & Mike Bastinelli (weekdays. 6:00-9:00am Pacific). Or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube.

Also look for Tim’s postings in the Palm Harbor Patch, The Gentlemen’s Association, and throughout the Internet.

Posted in Life | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »

 
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