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Archive for April, 2021

PACKING THE COURT

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 22, 2021

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– It’s time for a history lesson.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

During the 2020 campaign, then-presidential candidate Joe Biden proposed developing a bipartisan dialog regarding the number of justices to sit on the Supreme Court. This occurred following the confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett as Associate Justice, thereby putting conservatives firmly in control of the Court. Biden’s proposal was all part of his “unity” themed campaign he promised to America which, of course, was a bald faced lie. Instead of such a dialog, the Democrat controlled Congress has jumped the gun and is now proposing four more seats being added to the court which would enable the Democrats to take political control of the Court.

This legislation is being introduced by Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA), Reps. Jerry Nadler (D-NY10), Mondaire Jones (D-NY17), and Hank Johnson (D-GA4), all Democrats. Republicans, of course, were never consulted. So much for “unity.” If enacted, this would allow the court to grow from nine seats to thirteen. In reality, this is a thinly veiled attempt to politicize the supreme court in favor of leftist doctrine and a genuine threat to our Republic.

This is certainly not the first time politicians have tried to change the makeup of the Supreme Court. Let’s begin with this fact; the Court’s size had been set at nine since the passage of the Judiciary Act of 1869, over 150 years ago.

As a point of history, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (D) also tried to change the makeup of the court during his administration. Prior to this, his government work programs during the Great Depression were regularly rejected by the Court, thereby infuriating the President. To overcome this problem, FDR introduced the Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937. This would have allowed him to appoint a justice for every current justice over the age of 70 which, at the time, was six, thereby expanding the court to fifteen and presumably giving the president the votes needed to pass his legislation.

Fortunately, the Bill was defeated as it was considered by Congress as nothing more than an attempt by FDR to pack the court. Both Republicans and Democrats voted against it, including FDR’s Vice President at the time, John Nance Garner.

Just as in 1937, the 2021 Bill is based on political bias and is rightfully considered a court packing scheme by the Democrats. It will be interesting to see how Democrats vote on this legislation this go around. I suspect they will vote along party lines.

My question is simple; if the Democrats insist on doing this, why stop at a thirteen seat Court? Why not 99? Suppose the legislation is passed and thirteen becomes the magic number. What would the Democrats do if the Court is taken over by conservative justices? Increase the number of seats again? Frankly, any number other than nine would be considered a farce.

In other words, let’s uphold the Judiciary Act of 1869 and Keep It Simple Stupid.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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THE JIM CROW SHTICK

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 20, 2021

BRYCE ON POLITICS

– It’s a tired old game.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

When it comes to voting reform, Democrats gleefully point at their pending H.R.1 “For the People” Act which they claim will make voting accessible to more people, most of whom are illegal aliens. When the Republicans push for voter reform, such as what was recently implemented in Georgia, the Democrats accuse them of implementing racially designed “Jim Crow” laws. Even President Biden called the Georgia law, “Jim Crow in the 21st Century,” as well as many other Democrats and left-leaning media personnel.

Some of us are old enough to remember Jim Crow laws, but most of the voters today haven’t a clue regarding its background and it’s applicability today. Let’s try to clear this up.

Following the American Civil War, the country entered a period of “Reconstruction” of the South. This consisted of laws devised by northern Republicans to get the South back on its feet economically while securing the civil rights of the former slaves. Over time, federal troops withdrew from the South and Democrats took control of the State Assemblies and governor mansions. To combat Republican policies, these “Dixiecrats” implemented sweeping rules and regulations depriving blacks of their civil rights, particularly in the areas of segregation, land ownership and voting, thereby catering to white control. In effect, they were able to turn the clock backwards to before the Civil War without having to enslave anyone.

Over time, “Dixiecrats” power grew in parallel with the rise of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). In particular, both groups grew to prominence during the Wilson administration and beyond. It finally ended in 1964 with the passage of the Civil Rights Act under President Lyndon Johnson.

The rules devised by the southern Democrats came to be referred to as “Jim Crow,” which was named after a theater character stereotyping blacks from the early part of the 19th century. Such laws defined where a black could go to school, where to eat and drink, shop, reside, ride a bus, vote, and many other oppressive stipulations.

Interestingly, now the Republicans are being accused of enacting similar laws. It is rather ironic the party of Lincoln, who fought for the freedom of slaves, is being falsely accused of such nonsense. Let us not forget, not one Republican president owned a slave. The Democrats cannot claim otherwise.

Today’s Republicans are simply angling to stop illegal voting, such as fraudulent and duplicate voting. This is why they are in favor of such things as Voter Identification, verifying signatures, review of voter rolls, etc., none of which is in the Democrats’ H.R.1 Bill. In fact, H.R.1 would simplify voter cheating if enacted. Instead, Democrats claim Republican voter initiatives would prohibit people from voting, hence they claim it is “Racist” and akin to “Jim Crow.” Of course, this is an old tactic used by the radical left to try and bully people and has nothing to do with reality. It is a familiar shtick to falsely cast dispersions on others while they, themselves, are the true culprits trying to undermine the system for political gain.

What we have to realize is those who falsely claim others are racists, are truly the racists themselves. You can call the Republicans whatever you want, but you cannot distort the truth, especially when it comes to “Jim Crow.” Frankly, this tactic has been used so many times, I doubt if it is effective any longer. However, as long as the populace remains ignorant of our history, such as who the true designers of “Jim Crow” laws were, we will continue to produce a sucker every minute. Then again, some people like to be deceived.

For more info, see; “Voter Fraud is Dirty Business” – July 09, 2020

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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PASSING THE BUCK

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 15, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– Parenting: Don’t make your problems mine.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Last month, I suffered through a miserable lunch at a local restaurant, a place where I usually dine and know the owner well. The food and service was fine, but I happened to sit near a young mother and her one year old with a healthy set of lungs. The mother was accompanied by a friend to chat with and catch-up. While they talked, they paid little attention to the one year old in the high stool who was entertaining himself. Every now and then, the toddler would let loose with an ear-piercing shriek, something I think would drive dolphins away for twenty miles near the restaurant. As my back was to them, I was unprepared for the first shriek which caused me to drop my cutlery. When I turned to look, the mother apologized for the sound, but continued talking with her friend.

The second blast caused me to bolt from the restaurant. Realizing I was irritated, the mother made a snide remark to me, “I suppose you never had kids.” I replied I did, the big difference though was I knew how to parent, she obviously did not. The debate went downhill from there. I promised myself I would not eat there again if they’re present.

The real loser in this situation was the owner of the restaurant as the rest of the patrons were doubtlessly offended by the noise, but that wasn’t her concern.

I posted my displeasure on my Facebook page and was surprised how many people came out in my support. I had evidently touched a nerve.

One person said, “kids will be kids.” Maybe, but “parents have to be parents” as well. Back in the day when my kids were toddlers and fussed in a restaurant, I took them outside and sat in the car with them. The hum of the engine would put them to sleep. So I missed a few meals; so what. I would rather do that then upset the other patrons.

Another person pointed out it was the restaurant’s responsibility to handle the problem; telling the parents to either tend to the child or leave. I have talked with the restaurant owner about this on several occasions over the years. Most of the time, it is an awkward situation for him to handle diplomatically. Then again, there are instances where it has become necessary for him to boot out the offending parents and kid, but this is rare.

The point is, the parent was perfectly content to pass her problem along to the other patrons. Her problem became ours, which is obviously inconsiderate of her. I recognize her need to relax and talk to friends, but her first responsibility was to the child, second to the people around her, and third to herself. Her priorities were just the reverse though. She claimed since the child was only a year old, there was nothing she could do. Frankly, she didn’t even try. I contended she simply didn’t want to address the problem, or failed to see it as a problem at all. In other words, she was totally oblivious to the situation. Sadly, such people may know how to reproduce, but they certainly do not know how to parent. They will inevitably raise another generation of narcissistic people.

Babies can also be annoying on airplane trips, particularly if parents do not tend to them. Passengers will be patient up to a point, but if the parents drop the ball, they will likely let the parents know of their displeasure.

There are, of course, parents who are sensitive to the needs of both their child and fellow passengers. A friend told me of a recent flight where he had to sit next to a crying baby. The mother was smart though, and placed the following card on the seats around them prior to the trip:

“Hello! My name is Charlotte and I am 8 months old. This is my first flight and I’ll try to be on my best behavior. I think my Mom is more nervous than I am, so she made a goodie bag for you. Have a great flight!”

The passengers were delighted by the card and goodie bag. In return, they gladly helped the mother tend to the baby. Smart, very smart.

Being a parent means you have to assume certain responsibilities. However, we now live in a time where people are more concerned with entitlements than with responsibility. I contend we shouldn’t pass our problems on to others. Most people have enough trouble of their own. Perhaps the biggest thing I learned from this experience, and the comments made by my Facebook friends, is to take the parents to task and voice your displeasure. It’s not the child’s fault, but somebody has to give the parents a wake-up call.

Related article – “Making Your Problems Mine” – Aug 30, 2013

First published: November 30, 2015

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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FOR THE LOVE OF LAWYERS

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 13, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– What’s the difference between a lawyer and a catfish?

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

Of all of the professions out there, I think being an attorney has to be one of the most awkward. People tend to either love them or hate them, but most seem to regard them as a necessary evil. Lawyers are well aware of this which often causes awkward social situations for them. Consequently, they are somewhat cliquish and socialize amongst themselves. Whenever lawyers and judges get together, they have to be careful what they say as it might be used against them or they might need a political favor sometime down the road. Being “on-guard” 24/7 can cause anyone to become uptight.

Some people hold attorneys in high regard as some sort of lofty intellectuals. As for me, I see them more as the original Systems Analysts who are knowledgeable about the legal system and know how to traverse it. Nothing more, nothing less.

If an attorney is proficient in his or her profession, the next logical progression is to either become a judge or politician (as they are the ones who typically write legislation). I tend to believe such politicians spend an inordinate amount of time worrying about verbiage and chalking up political brownie points than getting anything done, but I digress. The point is, lawyers are naturally inclined to become political. They can’t help it, it’s in their DNA.

Actually, most attorneys aren’t bad people and, believe it or not, possess a good sense of humor. So why do so many people hate them? Actually, I think there are certain types of lawyers that malign the profession, namely “ambulance chasers” (personal injury) and divorce lawyers. I think this is where the adjectives “frivolous” and “ruthless” were derived from, but it is this small group of attorneys that give the profession a black eye and probably caused Shakespeare to call for all of them to be killed.

Whenever I tell a lawyer joke to my attorney friends, they politely chuckle but I can tell it gnaws on them. Nonetheless, they say nothing. As tasteless as the joke may be, they never utter a word in defense of their profession as it might offend someone. Again, they have to be on guard 24/7, but it kind of makes me wonder what kind of jokes lawyers tell when they are amongst themselves, probably Doctor related.

As a note, for a comprehensive listing of attorney jokes, see Lawyer-Jokes.us on the Internet which seems to have all of the classics, such as:

Q: What’s the difference between a lawyer and a catfish?

A: One is a slimy, bottom dwelling, scum sucker. The other is a fish.

First published: September 15, 2008

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

BEING A CAREGIVER

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 8, 2021

BRYCE ON LIFE

– How it affected my life.

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To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

For the last six years I have been a caregiver for my wife and mother, both of whom suffered from COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) which ultimately claimed both their lives. It was a rough road we traveled as I watched the disease slowly beat them down and break their spirits.

When I was about ten years old, my great grandfather passed away, leaving his wife a widow and alone. Fortunately, my grandmother stepped in and brought her in to live with her and my grandfather. The loss of her spouse was unbearable to my great grandmother as they had been together well over fifty years. Heartbroken, she died less than a year later. As a young man though, I learned the lesson of how the family took care of its own. This is what ultimately drove me to take care of both my wife and mother.

For years, I would wake up early to get some work done on my computer before they woke up. I would then run between homes to take care of them. Fortunately, my mother lived nearby in my neighborhood.

I quickly assumed new responsibilities, such as:

* Preparing their medications and vitamins for the day.

* Preparing and cleaning their nebulizer machines for breathing treatments.

* Maintained their oxygen machines which would from time to time require new lines and filters.

* Helping them get to and from the kitchen, either in a walker or wheelchair.

* Preparing meals for them, including snacks.

* Took them to doctor appointments.

* Entertained them, either through games, newspaper puzzles, rides around town, or just talking with them.

* And a long list of home maintenance chores, such as watering plants, making beds, grocery shopping, washing clothes, car maintenance, paying bills, etc.

In between all of this, I would work out of an office at both houses.

For six years I did this faithfully. Once in a blue moon I would get a chance to escape for a couple of days of fishing, but I would have to rely on relatives to substitute for me which was helpful but difficult for their schedules. Even when I was away, I couldn’t really relax as I kept worrying about them.

I am certainly not looking for accolades as I did this out of devotion to them. Day-in and day-out for six years, I felt like I was on a never-ending treadmill. It finally came to an end recently; my wife passed away just over a year ago, and my mother about a month ago.

Now I can reflect on their passing and what I went through. There really wasn’t much we could do medically for them. All I could do was to try and make them comfortable. Throughout all of this, I got the uneasy feeling they were actually training me to be alone, which is what I am now.

It seems somewhat eerie now as I no longer have a timetable to maintain and can catch up on my sleep. I suspect I can finally slip away for a longer vacation, but it seems odd for me to think this way. I still have this nagging feeling I should be doing something for them, but I now have to challenge myself to find a new direction. It all seems strange to me.

All of the oxygen machines have been turned off and returned to the vendor. I no longer hear their constant hum. I have disposed of all of the medications and processed considerable paperwork. It’s quiet now, deafeningly so.

Being a caregiver can be very demanding. I would often go to bed early as I was mentally exhaused. Occasionally, I would have to get up in the middle of the night to take care of an emergency for them, so I learned to sleep lightly. So, Yes, it is easy to burn yourself out if you are not careful. I found having a good friend to listen to you was incredibly important to maintain your faculties.

In spite of all this, I would give up everything just to talk with my wife or mother again. It was a hell of a lot of work, but I would do it all over again in a heartbeat.

Yes, families should take care of their own. If we didn’t, how can we say we honestly loved them?

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

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THE THREE PRINCIPLES OF THE PRESS

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 6, 2021

BRYCE ON THE NEWS MEDIA

– What the press knows about Americans.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

I recently gave a speech at the North Suncoast Republican Club in Homosassa (Citrus County) regarding the press, a favorite subject of mine as I have first-hand experience in how they operate, up close and personal. As you may remember, in 2016 I traveled with the press in Florida to cover the Trump rallies. Following this, I wrote a column regarding my experiences (click HERE).

In speaking to the Homosassa group, I articulated how the press tries to manipulate the American public. There are three principles the press relies on:

1. PEOPLE DO NOT WANT TO KNOW THE TRUTH

Actually, this is something I learned in business many years ago. Back then, we would be contracted by companies to audit how their system analysts and programmers built information systems. We discovered project teams who took a disciplined and methodical approach quietly and professionally went about their business. Even though their projects came in on time and withing budget, they were eclipsed by project teams who ran by the seat of their pants in a helter-skelter mode of operation. Remarkably, this latter group received accolades from management, not the former. This was a case of the “squeaky wheel getting the most oil,” which was unfair. Executives didn’t like it when we pointed this out. They saw their helter-skelter bunch as firefighters who would come in and rescue software snafus at all hours. When we pointed out their “firefighters” were actually the chief “arsonists,” this did not sit well with the executives.

What this points out is our beliefs are based on our perceptions, not necessarily what is reality. As an old systems man, I can assure you, if the input is wrong, the output will be wrong. It is, therefore, essential to control the input, which the news media has mastered for some time now. If you watch or read the news today, it is less about the truth, and more about political dogma (spin) which people prefer as they do not want to waste their time investigating the news and will trust those networks who most closely reflect their perspective of the world.

So, it is not so much the news media is not telling the truth as it is the people do not honestly want to know it, and the press capitalizes on this fact.

2. PEOPLE HAVE A SHORT ATTENTION SPAN

As you know, I have been critical of Americans’ sense of history. Our young people know little regarding American history, world history, or even trade history, meaning they know little about the past regarding their company and the industry they serve. Consequently, we tend to re-invent things over and over again, not to mention allowing history to repeat itself.

Think about it, when it comes to current events, there are a lot of people who cannot remember what happened yesterday or last week, or on September 11, 2001, or December 7, 1941, or July 4, 1776. Such a mindset makes it easy for the news media to distort the facts.

3. PEOPLE ARE APATHETIC

The press is cognizant of the fact most Americans are apathetic towards politics and tend to roll with the punches rather than fight city hall. I have personally met many people over the years who honestly believe our voting system is corrupt and not worth their time to participate. This is sad.

Further, between their family and business obligations, people consider their time to be precious, so they prefer having people interpret the news for them. This results in a large class of “sheople,” people who are unable to think for themselves and follow the crowd. This type of people prefer to be told what to do as opposed to thinking for themselves.

These three principles are in the back of the mind of today’s news reporters and explains why they do not express any remorse for pulling the wool over the eyes of the American public. To them, it is not about journalistic integrity, it’s about taking an elitist position over the “brain-dead” public. To paraphrase Abraham Lincoln, the press honestly believes, “You can fool all the people all of the time.”

So, what can be done to combat this problem? I provided 10 Tips for doing so last year. Among them, I encourage people to report flagrant errors in news reporting to the FCC. This applies to news as presented on television, radio, the Internet, and by telephone. The more complaints, the more effective you will be.

Better yet, learn to seek the truth, pay attention, get active, and don’t accept their BS. You’ll drive the press crazy!

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

Like the article? TELL A FRIEND.

Copyright © 2021 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

Listen to Tim on Spotify, WZIG-FM (104.1) in Palm Harbor,FL; SVA RADIO – “Senior Voice America”, the leading newspaper for active mature adults; or tune-in to Tim’s channel on YouTube. Click for TIM’S LIBRARY OF AUDIO CLIPS.

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

50 YEARS OF “PRIDE”

Posted by Tim Bryce on April 1, 2021

BRYCE ON BUSINESS

– Not bad for a small company that started in Cincinnati.

Click for AUDIO VERSION.
To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request.

My father, Milt Bryce, founded our company on April 1, 1971, in Cincinnati, Ohio, making today our 50th anniversary. He was always fond of saying that April 1st would be remembered as our joke on the computer industry. In reality, we had a great impact on the way people designed information systems and managed projects. Our main product was “PRIDE,” an acronym for “PRofitable Information by DEsign – through phased planning and control.” It was the first commercial methodology of its kind on the market, and helped foster a whole segment within the computer industry. Although it was a manual methodology at first, we added software which did some rather amazing things. By the way, in 1985 we moved the company to Tampa Bay, Florida.

Our first customer was the Marion Power Shovel Company in Marion, Ohio, closely followed by some rather large corporate accounts such as Tenneco, Babcock & Wilcox, and General Electric. From there, we spread oversees to places like Canada, Japan, Australia, Brazil, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, and throughout Europe. This afforded us the ability to travel and see quite a bit of the world. It has been quite a ride.

As for myself, I served the company in a variety of capacities, including marketing, customer service, product development, training, and consulting. This required considerable writing, including manuals, sales brochures, articles, technical papers, training scripts, and much more. From there I started to branch out to other subjects, such as politics, morality, and our changing world.

I learned several things about people through all of this; for example:

1. In the Information Technology (I.T.) world, the problems are all fundamentally the same regardless what country you visit. People still do not know how to define information requirements, design systems, or manage projects. Documentation is considered a waste of time, as they believe the real work resides in programming. Users are unhappy as they rightly believe nobody considers their point-of-view and developers claim the users don’t know what they want. The list can actually go on and on. Interestingly, everyone thinks their problems are unique. They aren’t.

2. People do not want to know the truth, and base their behavior on perceptions, not facts. I also found this to be so throughout the country when it comes to interpreting the news.

3. There is no sense of history in the I.T. industry, probably because schools teach nothing more than coding. Consequently, there is a tendency to reinvent the wheel year after year. This too, I see in other walks in life throughout the country, which explains why Americans do not understand our past. What a pitty.

4. Common sense is not common. People seem to prefer facade over substance. In the I.T. field, if you want to make money, just change the jargon and use cryptic concepts. People like to be mesmerized in this manner. I simply cannot believe the amount of snake oil sold in the I.T. industry, then again, this is probably true elsewhere.

5. People in I.T. are content doing small things, such as an “app.” The idea of designing and installing a massive system is beyond their comprehension, probably because they don’t know how to. This is why systems projects consistently come in late and over budget. As my father was fond of saying, “If we built bridges the same way we build systems in this country, this would be a nation run by ferryboats.”

6. Americans accept shoddy workmanship. I am always amazed when software companies ask their customers to “beta test” their products. To me, this is an admission they do not know how to test their products. Remarkably, people have been conned into believing this is an acceptable form of behavior and accept buggy programs.

7. In most I.T. departments I’ve been in, I have found either the management wants to do things right, and the troops rebel, or; the troops want to do things right, but management refuses to support them. I chuckle when I hear people say, “We do not have time to do things right.” Translation: “We have plenty of time to do things wrong.”

As I said, I have found these axioms to be universal.

Now, 50 years later, “PRIDE” is as relevant today as it was in 1971. Why? Three reasons:

1. We treated systems development as a science as opposed to an art form. We carefully defined our terminology, our concepts, and our techniques in plain English, without the usual gobbledygook of jargon.

2. It is derived from common-sense engineering/manufacturing concepts. It is based on the simple premise, “A system is a product that can be engineered and manufactured like any other product.” This is why we use such concepts as Blueprinting, Bill-of-Materials, Assembly Lines, Production Control, Inventory Control, and more.

3. It works! It has been used in just about every industry imaginable.

Fifty years is a long time, and I want to thank everyone who believed in us.

If you would like to know about the “PRIDE” Methodologies for Information Resource Management (IRM), you can find our book on Amazon (click HERE).

Or visit our web site at:
http://www.phmainstreet.com/mba/

Happy golden anniversary everyone! Who-da-thunk-it!

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – For a listing of my books, click HERE.

Note: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb1557@gmail.com

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

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